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Samaurai? katana? junk? copy? souvenir?

82trooper82trooper Member Posts: 251 ✭✭✭
edited September 2017 in Ask the Experts
I am looking for any assistance identifying this sword. It belonged to my father-in-law, and family story is it was a WWII bring back. He has now passed, and sadly I cannot ask him directly.
My concern is the grip/handle. It appears to be cast metal, replicating a cloth wrap. The handle itself does not attract a magnet (the blade does). My other concern is that all the reference sites I looked at show the handle held to the tang of the blade with tapered pins. This seems to have a screw holding it together. Clearly not correct...but perhaps a "fix"?
Any thoughts as to the originality (the handle fasteners aside)? Is it worth trying to get the screws out to see if the tang is marked? Does the metal handle indicate is not "real"?
Also, the numerals are "english", not japanese characters.
Here are some pix.
Any insight would be appreciated.
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Comments

  • p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    It's 100% legit. It's called an Japnaese NCO sword and is the later style aluminum tsuka. The iron guard is one variation, the other being brass.
    Current going rate for one in that condition is $300-$700.

    It's machine made, not forged. Junior officers would carry them too.
  • p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    Don't bother taking the tsuka off. See the staked screw ends? There is nothing under there to see.
    Don't repaint, sand, grind, or otherwise molest the sword. It was made between 1937 and 1944.

    If you want to clean it up, use a little Murphy's oil soap and a nylon brush. Follow up with a light coat of oil on the blade and scabbard.

    You should have some stamp of the black fuchi ring just aft of the guard. Look for a harp, stacked cannonballs or any little stamps about 5mm high. These will tell whether it was made at Kokura or Torrimatsu.

    It's supposed to have screws, not mekugi.
    Any specific questions just ask.
  • 82trooper82trooper Member Posts: 251 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks Skyking....I appreciate the quick reply. Now I am intrigued and want to know more. Where specifically would I find the makers mark? Nothing jumps out at me.
    Also, after looking closely, there is the same serial # on the scabbard, as well.
  • p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    Militaria collectors go for the NCO's. Actually sword collectors don't. Lots of info on the net and in books. Just Google Japanese NCO Sword and you'll get a bunch.

    Ben Stein had the best sites under Japanese Swords on the Internet.

    Start with this:
    https://nihontoclub.com/discussions/2013/12/24/aluminum-handle-sword
  • BarzilliaBarzillia Member Posts: 21,911 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by 82trooper
    I am looking for any assistance identifying this sword. It belonged to my father-in-law, and family story is it was a WWII bring back. He has now passed, and sadly I cannot ask him directly.
    My concern is the grip/handle. It appears to be cast metal, replicating a cloth wrap. The handle itself does not attract a magnet (the blade does). My other concern is that all the reference sites I looked at show the handle held to the tang of the blade with tapered pins. This seems to have a screw holding it together. Clearly not correct...but perhaps a "fix"?
    Any thoughts as to the originality (the handle fasteners aside)? Is it worth trying to get the screws out to see if the tang is marked? Does the metal handle indicate is not "real"?
    Also, the numerals are "english", not japanese characters.
    Here are some pix.
    Any insight would be appreciated.
    enhance
    enhance
    enhance
    enhance
    enhance
    enhance
    enhance
    enhance
    enhance
    enhance
    enhance
    enhance
    enhance


    Google "shin gunto"

    Don't do anything to it, get the provenance down on a 3x5 card.
    "Anger has two children -.hope, and courage." Augustine, Bishop of Hippo

    "Und es wird nicht hineingehen irgend ein Gemeines und das da Greuel tut und Luge,
    sondern die geschrieben sind in dem Lebensbuch des Lammes."
  • 82trooper82trooper Member Posts: 251 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
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