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Thumbhole stocks

pwilliepwillie Member Posts: 20,253 ✭✭✭
edited February 2016 in Ask the Experts
Whats your take on a thumbhole stock...thinking about one for my model 70 classic...??

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    pwilliepwillie Member Posts: 20,253 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Do thumbhole stocks reduce recoil? It seems what little general knowledge I have about physics lead me to believe it would reduce recoil because it gives a dispersion point for the recoil. Maybe it's the opposite and I'm just dumb.
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    pwilliepwillie Member Posts: 20,253 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    i have a rem.700 bdl and was considering a thumbhole stock(synthetic,camo).what are the benifits to a thumbhole stock?what are the downsides ?and who makes a good one?where can i find it?
    does Bell and Carlson make a quaility stock?
    thank you
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    tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I love the ones from Boyds. They fit me well, and feel awesome. I do some extra inletting, and install pillars, then bed the action and bottom metal, to mate to the pillars. I have had exceptional results.
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    11b6r11b6r Member Posts: 16,588 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Never had one until I got a Savage 93 a few years back. Rather like it. Looks weird, feels and shoots good.
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    He DogHe Dog Member Posts: 51,080 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I like them fine off the bench, they are an awkward pain in the butt to carry in the field, and in my view worthless as hunting rifles, thus I no longer own any.
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    nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,928 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    pwillie,

    Thumbhole stocks are truly one of those 'love/hate' topics. I don't recall ever reading anything but those too emotions when the topic came up for discussion.

    I personally use quite a number of thumbhole stocks from various manufacturers simply because they fit me and feel comfortable no matter what I am using them for. Yes, I do hunt with them, I shoot tactical competitions with them and I shoot from the bench with them. I will usually look at a thumbhole first and standard stocks second when available.

    This should not be misconstrued as being anti- standard stocks at all since I use them as well, many of which are exceptionally comfortable to handle, carry and shoot.

    Best.
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    jptatumjptatum Member Posts: 1,911 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have to agree with 11b6r. They give me better control of the rifle.
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    62fuelie62fuelie Member Posts: 1,069 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have them on two rifles, a pre-64 M-70 243 varmint and a Marlin/Sako .222 Rem. I shoot them from rests or offhand and like them both very much. One is a Richards Microfit and the other is a Boyd.
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    pwilliepwillie Member Posts: 20,253 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by 62fuelie
    I have them on two rifles, a pre-64 M-70 243 varmint and a Marlin/Sako .222 Rem. I shoot them from rests or offhand and like them both very much. One is a Richards Microfit and the other is a Boyd.
    ell me about the Richards Micro Fit!
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    beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 12,776 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I've got a Boyd's one on a 10-22 and really like it. I'd definitely buy another one.

    IMO thumbhole stocks are really most useful for target and benchrest type shooting, but when it comes down to it, its a matter of personal preference. Lots of people do use these for hunting and love them.

    If you find one you like, go for it.


    A few caveats here:

    -Depending on gun and stock you may not be able to reach the safety or other controls with your hand in firing position. This may or may not matter to you.

    -Some of the thumbholes stocks are "handed". . .some aren't. This won't matter probably 99% of the time, but if yours is, and this is a gun you're going to share with someone of the opposite handedness, then they won't be able to shoot it. Learned this on the range, loaning above gun to a lefty!.

    -This one is personal. . .I don't like the idea of having my thumb stuck IN the stock of a really high-recoil gun. (At least not with one of those guns where your thumb goes through a narrow hole).

    Yes, I know if you shoulder the gun correctly, your shooting hand shouldn't absorb any recoil, but I'm just afraid one time I'll screw something up and take a bunch of extra recoil right onto my thumb.

    That said, plenty of people shoot high recoil guns with thumbhole stocks with zero issues, and swear by them. In fact, I'm sure someone is going to come along right after this post and attest that for them recoil is REDUCED with one.

    No argument from me. . .(I'm just a "chicken". . .see above about "personal preference!" [;)]
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    Okie743Okie743 Member Posts: 2,617 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I was about to test one from Boyds for a hunting rifle and noticed what Hedog said about the thumbhole looked like might be kinda a pain if carrying the gun very much thru brush or long hikes not being as user friendly as a regular stocked bolt action gun..

    Looks like would be great on benchrest for good trigger control.

    They are priced very reasonable from Boyds and probably would hold their resale value good you did like your choice. I decided I was happy enough with what I had that is already shooting good groups and fits me good.
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    CapnMidnightCapnMidnight Member Posts: 8,520
    edited November -1
    pwillie,
    I just got in a thumbhole stock for a pre 64 model 70. I'm taking the stock off and putting to old girl into it's original factory stock. If your interested, I'll post pictures and put it up on the auction side. Chris (dad's 30-40) has seen the stock, it's very fancy with lots of inletting and a gloss finish. The stock was built by a custom gunsmith in Southern California, name Lawson in the late 60s.
    W.D.
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