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Bob the hammer safe?

mrdropclothmrdropcloth Member Posts: 614 ✭✭✭
edited March 2016 in Ask the Experts
I have a Taurus model 85 Lite weight 5 shot revolver with standard hammer.
My question is , would it be safe and dependable to have a gunsmith "bob" the hammer so it wouldn't snag in trouser pocket(s)?

Comments

  • nmyersnmyers Member Posts: 16,165 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    We don't use the words "dependable" & "Taurus" in the same sentence.

    We know that Taurus has had problems with parts breaking, particularly with their MIM parts (of which the hammer is one). You could probably "safely" bob a hammer yourself with a Dremel tool, but it just doesn't seem to be a good idea to alter such a critical part.

    If you decide to do it, at least order a spare hammer for you to keep in the box, just in case you decide to sell it some day.

    Neal
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,351 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    +1 for score a used/replacement hammer first. Also look for a more powerful hammer spring to ensure reliable ignition. A friend had his S&W 36 done and the lighter hammer had problems with some ammo loaded with tougher primers.
  • Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,293 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    A friend bobbed the hammer of his Taurus 85. Misfires ensued. He had to cram in a Smith J mainspring to get it to shoot.
  • beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 13,137
    edited November -1
    My Smith 60 has a semi-bobbed hammer and never had an issue with it. It looks professionally done, and the one who did it took off just enough metal to make the thing snag-resistant, but there is still enough spur left that that you can still manually cock it.

    I think you probably could do this with a Taurus too, and get it to be "safe and dependable", but the only way to really know is to try it and see. If you're willing to take the risk, and your gunsmith is willing to replace the hammer if it doesn't work, you could try this.

    Most "dependable" way to get a hammerless revolver is just to buy one!

    I might add, that having owned/tried both, I actually prefer the revolver WITH hammer. Of course being able to cock the revolver if you want a single action shot is an advantage. I personally also see snagging on the pocket as an ADVANTAGE. . .it keeps the revolver from falling out your pocket by accident, or anyone ELSE from pulling it out.

    Way to get the revolver NOT to snag is simply to place your thumb over the hammer when you draw.
  • tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682
    edited November -1
    I have done both S&W J frames, and Taurus 85's for customers. I do a complete spur removal, and then checker the top of the hammer for a single action shot. The only difference between the two jobs, is the S&W uses the standard mainspring, and the Taurus, I install a heavier mainspring. Consequently the heavy spring I install in the Taurus is the same weight as the factory spring in the S&W...go figure.

    As has been pointed out, Taurus would not be my first choice to stake my life on.

    EDIT 1
    quote:quote:Originally posted by gunnut505
    OP about Taurus 85 hammer bobbing shouldn't get clogged up with spurious claims about other makes.
    I bobbed the hammer on my Taurus 85 ultralight in 17HMR with no problems whatsoever. It left the base of the hammer 1/4" proud of the rear sight (which got dehorned). All 8 shots go off with no difficulties in ignition.
    If your 85 is centerfire, you may need a Wolfe spring, then again; you may not.


    Again from professional experience(not just bobbing one or two, but over 2 dozen), the Taurus is better served with a little stiffer mainspring. The centerfire primer cups are workhardened steel, not brass, like the rimfires. My customers need their gun to go bang when they pull the trigger, not after a return trip to the shop.
  • TxsTxs Member Posts: 18,801
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by beantownshootah
    Way to get the revolver NOT to snag is simply to place your thumb over the hammer when you draw.Yep. Hideout Gun 101.

    And sliding your thumb up underneath the hammer spur as you cram it IN a pocket or holster is a good move.
  • papernickerpapernicker Member Posts: 1,070 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    A very good move
  • v35v35 Member Posts: 13,200
    edited November -1
    Single action has a better chance of good primer strike than double action which has a shorter stroke.
    I've had issues with Charter Arms and a model 37 Chief.
    If it doesn't bother you to go to a heavier trigger pull then go ahead
    and cut the hammer spur.
  • gunnut505gunnut505 Member Posts: 10,290
    edited November -1
    OP about Taurus 85 hammer bobbing shouldn't get clogged up with spurious claims about other makes.
    I bobbed the hammer on my Taurus 85 ultralight in 17HMR with no problems whatsoever. It left the base of the hammer 1/4" proud of the rear sight (which got dehorned). All 8 shots go off with no difficulties in ignition.
    If your 85 is centerfire, you may need a Wolfe spring, then again; you may not.
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