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1885 Win. 22 short musket?

litetriggerlitetrigger Member Posts: 320 ✭✭
edited May 2016 in Ask the Experts
I have an 1885 Win full stock Hi-Wall in 22 short. It has a military look, but no military proof marks. Ser. #121923 any info. on this? Thanks

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    tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yes, and absolutely yes. The Winder Musket, was an ammo saving training device.

    There are several listed on the auction side.

    http://www.GunBroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=553655127

    Bert will be along soon to give exact details, I am sure.
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    Bert H.Bert H. Member Posts: 11,279 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Your Model 1885 is a very late production 2nd variation Winder Musket. It was manufactured very near the end of the year 1917, or in very early 1918. It will have a Krag Model 1901 windgauge rear sight, mounted tight to the frame ring.
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    fordsixfordsix Member Posts: 8,554 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    i have one the 22 short kicks like a mule[:D]
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    litetriggerlitetrigger Member Posts: 320 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    It seems that my 1885 Winder 22 short will also accept 22 LR. Would the chamber have to be modified for this?
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    tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Absolutely, and that is a very common, non-factory modification. There were/are a lot of folks out there who were utilitarian's, and not collectors. they made something work to fit their needs. When the production of 22 short(and long for that matter) ammo dropped off in favor of the LR, the price went up. 20-30 years ago, those Winders were viewed by many as inexpensive left over's, as they could be had for well under $100.00. Folks were selling them because ammo was getting more expensive, and hard to find. So the utilitarian's, knowing a good deal when they saw it, purchased it, and stuck a chamber reamer in it, and in some cases the proper sized drill(read as BUBBA the wannabe gunsmith). The non-factory chamber is something to ALWAYS look for on a Winder.
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    tapwatertapwater Member Posts: 10,335 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by litetrigger
    It seems that my 1885 Winder 22 short will also accept 22 LR. Would the chamber have to be modified for this?


    ..This is a question for Bert, however my neighbor had one that
    also chambered .22 LR despite being marked .22 Short. We always
    assumed the chamber had been lengthened.
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    Bert H.Bert H. Member Posts: 11,279 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by tapwater
    quote:Originally posted by litetrigger
    It seems that my 1885 Winder 22 short will also accept 22 LR. Would the chamber have to be modified for this?


    ..This is a question for Bert, however my neighbor had one that
    also chambered .22 LR despite being marked .22 Short. We always
    assumed the chamber had been lengthened.


    The 2nd variation Winder Muskets marked "22 SHORT" should not chamber a 22 Long Rifle cartridge. If they do, somebody reamed the chamber after the fact. The accuracy will also be poor, as Winchester cut the rifling for a 1:20 twist rate for the 22 Short, whereas the 22 LR chambered rifles & Winder Muskets were made with a 1:16 twist rate (for the heavier 40-gr bullet). If you shoot the Hi-Vel 22 LR ammo, you will get better accuracy.
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