In order to participate in the GunBroker Member forums, you must be logged in with your GunBroker.com account. Click the sign-in button at the top right of the forums page to get connected.

Colt DA 38

Bigtime66Bigtime66 Member Posts: 11 ✭✭
edited October 2010 in Ask the Experts
Hey Guys, I have a problem that I hope that someone can help me with. I just picked up a colt revolver and need to know what ammo to feed it. I would also love to know the model of the gun if anyone knows it. I intend on using it as just a little protection in my boat.

Nickle plated
Double Action
Serial # 230 843

I hope that these pictures will help.

IMG_0032.jpg

IMG_0026.jpg

IMG_0028.jpg

IMG_0029.jpg

Any help would be greatly appreciated[:)]

Comments

  • Bigtime66Bigtime66 Member Posts: 11 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    4 1/2 in. barrel. Engraved. Pearl grips with carved Eagle on right side grip. Serial # 249XXX. Pat on barrel Aug 5 84. Nov 6 88. Mar 5 95. Frame # matches cylinder #.

    Phoned Colt. Was told serial # could be same on different models.

    Looks very similar to the revolver at this addy. Diff engrave design and no gold cylinder.

    http://www.ocyoung.com/Colts.htm

    Book on Colt Revolvers out of print. Only copy in one library in state. 200 miles away.

    Would appreciate any info or thoughts.
  • Bigtime66Bigtime66 Member Posts: 11 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a 1877 Colt Lightning DA 38. The triger does not return to origional position after firing. I think it might be a spring, but I have taken it apart and can not tell if spring is broken or not. I printed a part explosion from coltparts.com, but it's not a very good detailed picture. Does anyone know where I can get a better detailed photo of the assembly on this gun ? Thanks.
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,649 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    From your serial number, it appears to be a "New Army and Navy Model", made in the early years of the 20th Century. These were chambered for a cartridge called the .38 Long Colt, which was originally a low pressure Black Powder loading. Nowadays the only source of safe loads for this revolver would be those made for the so called Cowboy Action Shooters who use these light loads in their competitions. Given the age of the revolver and that it's obviously been reworked. I would take it to a competent gunsmith, for inspection and test firing, with special attention to it's timing and lock up functions.
  • ruger41ruger41 Member Posts: 14,585 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    You can in a pinch also use .38 Short Colt(NOT .38 S&W)if you happen to find any. Black Hills & Ten-X make .38 Long Colt and Black Dawge makes .38 Long Colt and .38 Short Colt but be aware they get backordered on it a lot so you may have a bit of a wait time. If you don't reload-I'd start to learn because you generally cannot find this cartridge on most dealer shelves. You can order directly from Black Dawge-just be aware they use black powder/black powder substitute which is fine for you gun just make sure you clean it after useage.
    http://www.blackdawgecartridge.com/cgi-bin/bdstore/perlshop.cgi?ACTION=thispage&thispage=bd_ammo.html&ORDER_ID=989599250
  • Bigtime66Bigtime66 Member Posts: 11 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    So, in other words, It ain't worth keeping? I don't reload and don't intend to start[:(].
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,649 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Bigtime66
    So, in other words, It ain't worth keeping? I don't reload and don't intend to start[:(].


    It's not factory original because it has been nickel plated, and the wooden grips have been replaced by Pachmayr's. Because of this it's not going to be a big buck item, no mater what you decide to do with it. If the gunsmith sayes it safe you might as well pick up some of the cowboy loads for it, it will do just fine as a beater boat gun.
  • p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    Most every one that I've ever seen has been honed out to shoot 38 Special. I don't use plus P's but just standard velocity wadcutters or round nose.
    Never had a problem.

    If a piece of crap like a Davis derringer can handle 38 special, I know any Colt I have can too.
  • ruger41ruger41 Member Posts: 14,585 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Bigtime66
    So, in other words, It ain't worth keeping? I don't reload and don't intend to start[:(].

    You can keep it-just buy enough ammo for it to keep you in business. Midway has some in stock right now so don't wait(they have 18 boxes as of 8:30am pacific time-verified by a phone call) For some odd reason when you scroll through their .38 Long Colt ammo section it shows it on back order but when you click on Black Hills it says available and will ship today--so I called them and they said the front page was wrong and that they had 18 boxes in stock. http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=589514
  • Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,320 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Most every one that I've ever seen has been honed out to shoot 38 Special.

    They are not "honed out," they were made that way.
    Original .38 Long Colt had an outside lubricated heel type bullet the full diameter of the cartridge case. Chambers were bored straight through. A standard .38 Special is an overload but "good old days" quality has let you get away with it.
    Don't try it with a .357 Magnum which will also "fit."
  • Wolf.Wolf. Member Posts: 2,223 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Be smart. Shoot the caliber that teh gun was made for. Give Colt a call; they can tell you when it was made and MAY be nice enough to tell you whether it was made for black or smokeless.

    Shooting black is fun, but immediate cleaning is an absolute necessity, because the residue is corrosive and collects heavily in every nook and cranny! If you shoot black, do not lubricate or clean with any hydrocarbon (aka crude oil)-based lubricants or solvents. The best thing to clean with is Simple Green or its equivalent and warm water. Personally, I lube black powder guns only with 100% pure lanolin.

    REASON: even with black powder metallic cartridges (rather than cap and ball percussion), black powder and hydorcarbons are a bad mix. The oil/solvent residue combines with the BP residue and turns into a sticky, asphaltine mess. It will clog up the gun so badly, the gun will stop revolving and the cylinder chambers may be hard to load or unload. It's a mess. Just my experience.
  • KnifecollectorKnifecollector Member Posts: 3,267 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I'd say it was made in 1904.
  • CS8161CS8161 Member Posts: 13,590 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Get rid of it and buy yourself a cheap S&W model 65 to keep on your boat, you can fire 38 Specials or 357 Mags if you encounter some Mexican pirates attempting to board your vessel![;)]
Sign In or Register to comment.