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ppk-s ?

uncle milouncle milo Member Posts: 419 ✭✭✭
edited October 2003 in Ask the Experts
am planing to buy a walther ppk . but all the german made models of this gun in my area are used, over-priced and worn out. i have been told the american model made by Interarms is to be avoided because of quality problems. have any of you folks had any experience with the new Smith & Wession copy of this model? Please advise.[?]

Comments

  • gap1916gap1916 Member Posts: 4,977
    edited November -1
    Why the Walther? The USA made Walther in my humble opinion is a very well made hand gun. If you are looking for something small that packs a punch look at the Kahr P9. My 2 cents [8D]

    Greg
  • p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    The Interarms Walther is fine. I've carried (and used) my PPk for over 10 years, nary a misfire.

    You are your own best teacher. My advice is to question all things. Seek for answers, and when you find what seems to be an answer, question that too. L'Amour
  • jsergovicjsergovic Member Posts: 5,526
    edited November -1
    I believe the Kahr is slimmer, a little taller, and takes a heavier ammo.
    Regarding new Made-In-America by S&W Walthers:

    My PPK/S is wonderfully machined; I love the way it field-strips.
    Had a few jambs in the first 100 rounds, a few more in the next 500,
    getting near 1000+ total, and the last few boxes it was giving me 98-99%.

    I DID have a chipped firing pin (titanium), got a new one with spring for free; easier than sending it back but tricky to install.

    AND DIG THIS - The ejector arm (or maybe it has to do with feeding a round after a casing is ejected (the one on the left side, a lever-like apparatus), broke at it's pivot, although the firearm still operated. WatherAmerica couldn't believe it, but sh*t happens. I had a new one in two - three days.

    So I like my Walther, but it is not as accurate as I would like. My Makarov fired more accurately first time out, but not as comfortable.
    My next piece is a Para CCW745S - nice slim grip.
  • The artist formerly known as DanoThe artist formerly known as Dano Member Posts: 29,215
    edited November -1
    A friend of mine has a Walther PPK-S.

    I've shot it, and it's terrible. It has one of the worst triggers I've ever experienced. The frame / grip on the gun, will rub your shooting hand raw.

    He paid some good money for it, and he is very disappointed with it. I think he is going to use it for trading material in the near future.

    Almost forgot. It jams like there's no tomorrow.

    The "ONLY" bad thing about owning "A GUN" is...not owning two or more!
  • SirVetteSirVette Member Posts: 50 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    You might want to do a search. Comments like dano made are normal.
    Many get it only because a writer a long time ago used it for Bond's pistol- a very good choice at the time he wrote the novels.

    Looked into the best 380s awhile back.

    Pair of BERSA 85 380s.
    [8D]
  • The artist formerly known as DanoThe artist formerly known as Dano Member Posts: 29,215
    edited November -1
    I have two Beretta mdl. 84's.

    Both are premium shooters!

    Smooth as the rear end on a Victoria's Secret model.......[:D]

    The "ONLY" bad thing about owning "A GUN" is...not owning two or more!
  • SirVetteSirVette Member Posts: 50 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Dano

    Sounds good. Liked the Browning DBA 380 & considered it.
    Are you aware that the 84 was strengthened w/ the 84B & again w/ the 84BB?

    For those unfamiliar w/ the Browning BDA 380:
    has a Walther safety & is similiar to the Beretta 84, 84B & 84BB.
  • The artist formerly known as DanoThe artist formerly known as Dano Member Posts: 29,215
    edited November -1
    One of my 84's is a BB model. A beautiful gun, and I don't say that very often about a gun....just women! It's an early to mid 70's issue I believe.

    The "ONLY" bad thing about owning "A GUN" is...not owning two or more!
  • rsnyder55rsnyder55 Member Posts: 2,626
    edited November -1
    I have several PP's, PPK's, PPK/S's, and TPH's made in Germany, France, and the US and have never had a problem with any of them. I have bought several very inexpensively from others who claimed they always jammed but did not have a problem with them after I got them. The only thing I could attribute their problems to is limp wristing.
  • nmyersnmyers Member Posts: 16,121 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    In .380, the PPK's are painful to shoot; they seem to "bite" your hand, no matter how you hold it. A tape of my last shooting session with one would sound like: "Bang. Ow!. Bang. Ow! Bang. Ow!...." You get the picture.

    The American-made models are generally well made, although fit & finish is not as good as the German ones. The biggest problem is that Interarms can't fix any problem you might have; you just have to find an independent gunsmith & pay the going rate for repairs.

    A few months ago I sold a German PPK/S in 99+% condition on the GB auction for $350. Maybe you just need to keep looking if that is what you really want.

    Neal
  • JgreenJgreen Member Posts: 2,579 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have had the misfortune of having one of the last interarms .32s. AWFUL pistol.

    It was replaced with one of the first Smith and Wesson .380s. WONDERFUL pistol.

    The older walthers can give you hammer bite, but I have never had that problem, and the new ones have a longer beavertail, so that is no longer a concern.

    The important thing for function of a Walther is a firm grip. Limp-wristing the pistol will result in a failure to eject/feed.

    I feel very comfortable with a .380 walther; you can find for $250.00 a Manurhin walther PP, in .32. It has a 1/2 inch longer barrel than the PPK, but the same grip as a PPK/s. Manurhin built the PPs under license for years, and even the classic post-war walthers were made by Manurhin, but finished and assembled by walther.
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