.

reloads

leadlead Member Posts: 2,513 ✭✭
edited April 2002 in Ask the Experts
What kind of powder do you find in reloads? I plink mostly and look for bargains in ammo. I used to buy Enforcer reloads in 38spl but it was always dirty. I bought Ultramax 357's yesterday and shot some in my model 19, it was like sending up smoke signals! I hate to see that nice blue finish covered in a layer of soot. Any good suggestions out there? I might add, I also bought some Cavim 38spl. and was very impressed with them. I don't think you can get 357 in those though. Thanks.

Comments

  • leadlead Member Posts: 2,513 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I need a good load for a Bushmaster .223 using Varget powder.
  • modocmodoc Member Posts: 474 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    It is time for you to load your own ammo.That way you can learn about the different powders and how much "SOOT" is generated by each.
    I think you will find, however,that to keep from cleaning your pistol it is best left unshot.Hope this helps.

    BILL
  • badboybobbadboybob Member Posts: 1,658 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    What Modoc said. I have found the cleanest burning powders for my loads are: Clay's for anything up to .38 spcl and Titegroup for 9mm and up. The loads are fine tuned for accuracy, not max energy.

    PC=BS
  • binderbinder Member Posts: 242 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Just a little note on the side for those of you who shoot a lot of lead. A Lewis Lead remover is a good item to have for lead removal around the forcing cone. Available from Brownell's.
    Also most 2.7 -3.0 grain loads of bullseye and other fast burning powders will smoke somewhat in 38's,/357's. Also kind of depends on the lube on the bullet(greases will smoke more than dry lube like Hornady bullets have.
    A light handed person with 0000 steel wool and a little gun oil will remove the soot, BE CAREFUL!!!!!!!!!!!!! and the bluing won't come off. This process is also used by some smiths for removing light rust from barrels... Care and a extra light hand, and a good magnifying lamp will help alot, too heavy a hand will remove the bluing.
  • leeblackmanleeblackman Member Posts: 5,683
    edited November -1
    Yea you will probably find that reloads with lead bullets instead of jacketed bullets will make your gun alot more dirty.

    Visit me http://www.geocities.com/gunsmithlee
  • rogerreloaderrogerreloader Member Posts: 107 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Reloades with lead wiii smoke. Its the lead not the powder.
  • aby80aby80 Member Posts: 245 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have 2 .38 spec. S & W revolvers. One I bought new in 1953 and the other new in 1969. I have shot thousands of rounds of ammo loaded with lead bullets out of both. The bullets I cast and lubed with a soft lube sooted the guns more than the bullets I bought that were lubed with a hard lube. When I am through shooting the lead loaded ammo I finish off my sessions with a dozen jacketed loaded bullets. I spray the outside of the gun with WD-40 and the soot wipes right off. I then clean the barrel and wipe the gun down with a rag lubed with a good gun oil.
  • binderbinder Member Posts: 242 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Yea, I agree that shooting about 12-18 jacketed bullets will help clean the lead out, of the barrel, but not the forcing cone, it just builds up.
    The wd-40 idea is good but in the winter wd-40 will gum up at lower temps. A product from ZEP co. is better, either ZEP 45 or Super penetrant works all year long, A good moly disulfide works great but gets dirty.
  • mballaimballai Member Posts: 1,280 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I like to use the copper coated lead bullets from National Bullet--cleaner, less smoky and the barrel doesn't get fouled up so quick. If you shoot indoors, you really should avoid plain lead bullets in your reloads.

    Three Precious Metals: Gold, silver and lead
  • leeblackmanleeblackman Member Posts: 5,683
    edited November -1
    I know that after a match or a day at the range with my 1911 and abunch of my handloads with lead 200gr swc's, that baby is really dirty.

    Visit me http://www.geocities.com/gunsmithlee
  • jogn2jogn2 Member Posts: 26 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Lead bullets are lubricated and a lot of the smoke you see is from the lubricant. There are some powders out there that are known as "dirty" but they can still be very accurate.
    As far as the soot you can use a "Lead Away" gun cleaning cloth by Kleen Bore. Its not near as abrasive as steel wool, but if you get real agressive it will take the blue off.
Sign In or Register to comment.