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anybody know what a 8.57 mauser is zeroed at

CHEVELLE427CHEVELLE427 Member Posts: 6,750
edited February 2008 in Ask the Experts
I have a 1938 Turk mauser 8.57, and a Swiss 7.5 K11.

Went to the range today and both were about 3 feet high at 100yd, this is with iron sites set all the way down.

moved over to the 200 yd target and it was about a foot high, surprised me I hit the target 7 out of 10 with open sites at 200.[^]

The bullet was a 180gr running around 2240 on the mauser and 180gr on the Swiss fps unknown. I was thinking maybe the older bullets in the two guns hay days may have been heavier?

any ideas[?]

Comments

  • ww2buff9067ww2buff9067 Member Posts: 472 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I've loaded several rounds of 8x57 with IMR 3031 and a 150 grain bullet, and my "new" M48 shoots a foot and a half high at 100 yds, but when I shoot 175 gr bullets, I'm about 4" high ?!?!?! So I'm planning to make up a bunch of rounds with different bullet weights but the same powder and see what happens. The original round for the 8x57JS (standard high powered round used during ww2) shoots a 198 grain boat tail bullet, maybe that has more to do with the accuracy than we think?

    Hope this helps, I'll let you know what I find out after my trip to the range...

    Mike
  • CHEVELLE427CHEVELLE427 Member Posts: 6,750
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by ww2buff9067
    I've loaded several rounds of 8x57 with IMR 3031 and a 150 grain bullet, and my "new" M48 shoots a foot and a half high at 100 yds, but when I shoot 175 gr bullets, I'm about 4" high ?!?!?! So I'm planning to make up a bunch of rounds with different bullet weights but the same powder and see what happens. The original round for the 8x57JS (standard high powered round used during ww2) shoots a 198 grain boat tail bullet, maybe that has more to do with the accuracy than we think?

    Hope this helps, I'll let you know what I find out after my trip to the range...

    Mike



    thanks mike any info will help

    i know the swiss was 35.4 of 3031(i pulled them and checked ),
    the mauser was 45gr of win 760, both were 180 gr bullets
  • swearengineswearengine Member Posts: 1,329 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The majority of these battle rifles have a "zero" at the lowest sight setting of 300 meters. There are some that are marked as 200 meters, but the vast majority are 300.
  • richbugrichbug Member Posts: 3,650
    edited November -1
    The turk would have been sighted for a 154 grain, flat base spitzer bullet somewhere near 3000 fps.
  • muttermutter Member Posts: 122 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    +1 swearengine

    Standard sighting was 300 meters. If the rifle was sighted correctly, and you used original ammo, they would print 8 inches high at 100 yards.
  • 11b6r11b6r Member Posts: 16,725
    edited November -1
    As the guys have said- basic combat zero was 300 meters- had to do with "grazing fire". Some info for you on your rifles:http://www.surplusrifle.com/swissk31/index.asp Basic concept- zeroed at 300, hold on center body mass, get a hit SOMEWHERE on the body at any reasonable range.
  • sandwarriorsandwarrior Member Posts: 5,599
    edited November -1
    CHEVELLE427,

    The Turkish Mauser or T-38 shot a 154 gr. bullet @ about 3000 fps. They are silver in color. I can't remember if they are soft steel or tin. The K-31 shot a 174 gr. bullet @ about 2600. That bullet was a silver color as well. Again not sure what the construction of the bullet is.

    In shooting both of mine I noted the Turk shoots about 6" high @ 100. Which is good for a 300 yd. battle zero. The K-31 shot about 2-3" high. Which would be normal for a 6 o'clock hold. I noted my K-31 was right on all the way out to 500 when I shot it that far with GP11 ammo. A 6 o'clock hold is sort of like a battle zero. If you were to shoot at a typical circular target the bullet would be in the bullseye if you held the front and rear sight even with the bottom of the circle. It would seem to me to be a somewhat small circle as I didn't notice the height difference that the Mauser gave me.
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