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Mauser Rifle

evilpuppethead1evilpuppethead1 Member Posts: 11 ✭✭
edited October 2006 in Ask the Experts
TRADED FOR a mauser rifle rebarreled to .308 caliber short barrel synthetic stock nice job my question is was it commercial or a military in its former life markings are as follows a star emblem followed by SerieC.CH NO5351 MAUSER- WERKE A.B. OBENDORF A/N. also has mauserlogo on top rear of reciever I would like to mount a long eye relief scope on it for a scout rifle any comments or suggestions would be appreciated thanks Rick

Comments

  • evilpuppethead1evilpuppethead1 Member Posts: 11 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Gentlemen
    I just registered on this forun to see if I could get some advise on a Mauser rifle that I have. First of all it is an 8MM, with a 98 large ring receiver. On the side of the receiver it has GEW 98, a crest on the top of the front ring with the word DANZIG under the crest, and 1918 under that. The barrell is approximately 22" long with several german stamps on the barrell as well as the number s/42G on the right side of the rifle. The stock has a top piece that goes in front of the rear sight to the first barrell ring. The bottom of the stock goes to the end of the barrell covered with a metal cover that fastens to the stock.

    Any information I can get would be appreciate. By the way, this rifle still shoots and is pretty accurate out to about 200 yards. I have shot it several times with old military as well as factory and reloaded amunition.
  • evilpuppethead1evilpuppethead1 Member Posts: 11 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    My grandfather left me a mauser rifle, 8mm. I have shot it a lot and it is extrememly accurate . It has the most beautiful stock, monte carlo great walnut figure, original mauser buttplate and plate at pistol grip. I have always assumed he had a custom stock built for it, however the stock is stamped germany in block letters near the wrist and my brother thinks mauser may have sold these rifles stocked in this style. Does anyone know about this?

    2n7qo9j.jpg

    2qupw5t.jpg

    xgcr42.jpg
  • evilpuppethead1evilpuppethead1 Member Posts: 11 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hey All,
    I have a mauser rifle that I got from my grandpa after his death. I don't know much about it so I'm posting here to see if anyone has any info or value of the gun.
    The caliber is 9.3 x 62. It is a bolt action with a double trigger to set the pull of the trigger. It has open sites and the rear site has three different sites. Two flip up to adjust for range. It is stamped with Waffenfabrik Mauser-Oberndorf on the side of the chamber. I have pictures but I didn't see anywhere to post them.
    Any help would be appreciated.
    scott
  • evilpuppethead1evilpuppethead1 Member Posts: 11 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I am probably going to buy a Yugo M48, M48A or M48B. There are several on the web at decent cost. This will be used as a "shooter" only, no wall hanging.
    Any comment as to which of the models has an advatage over the other?
    There is a nice looking M24/47 also listed. Any avatage with this model?
    As always, I appreciate the responses from members.
  • evilpuppethead1evilpuppethead1 Member Posts: 11 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have an older mauser sporterized .243 and I am trying to find info on the exact make and model. Also, I need a new barrel is there an aftermarket barrel that I could purchase?
  • evilpuppethead1evilpuppethead1 Member Posts: 11 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I recently purchased a rifle and need some information. What it reads on the rifle itself is : ( Fa'brica de itajuba brasil ) - ( 15 de novembro 1889 ) - estados unidos de brasil ) - (mod 08/34.30 ) and some serial numbers. Can anyone tell me what kind of gun this is and where and when it was made? Also of the value of the gun? Any information would be greatly appreciated, thank you, Chas
  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    Sound like a nice MAUSER sporting rifle and may be worth a bit I would be able to tell you more if you send pictures to [email protected]
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,649 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Here are instructions for posting photos.


    First thing you need is a site to host your picture. What I mean by that is that you will need to upload your pictures to a web site that will host(display) them for you. You should not use your hard drive to host pictures for safety sake. Use www.photobucket.com to host your pictures.

    After you have uploaded your pictures to the site that will host them for you(per their directions), the next thing you will want to do is go to the picture hosting site and view the picture. While you are viewing the picture, right click on it and you'll see another window that should pop up, now click on "properties" and copy the picture URL. If you know how to "copy & paste" this will be a piece of cake.

    Now that you have the picture URL and your ready to post your picture. Do the following, use the following code except take out the "*" asterisk. The "*" asterisk is used here only so you can see the code. In other words if I posted the code without the "*" asterisk you will see a picture instead of the code. Anyways use this code to post your picture..
    [*img]the picture URL goes here[*/img]




    If your granddad's Mauser is a commercial version rather then a reworked military rifle, and in factory original condition. It could possibly, be worth good money? With quality photos, we could give you a better idea.
  • evilpuppethead1evilpuppethead1 Member Posts: 11 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Here are some pictures. Not too high quality. Hopefully good enough to get a general idea.

    DCP00548.jpg
    DCP00544.jpg
    DCP00562.jpg
    DCP00561.jpg
  • nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,934 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    evilpuppethead1,

    You have an excellent example of a Commercial Mauser Type 'B' sporter. Type 'B' stands for Buchsen which translates to mean rifle. According to my references, it was made sometime between 1926 and 1927 based on an example with a serial number of 95493 and yours being 95496. This was part of a small run of Type 'B's chambered for the 9.3 x 62 cartridge.

    The barrel is an odd one, being a sort of Type 'E' barrel but with the modified steps similar to the military barrels but more highly refined.

    Most were made for use in Europe and came equipped with double set trigger and lever release floorplates as yours is. The sling swivel was mounted a few inches in front of the forend on the barrel instead of in the stock. This allowed the rifle to sit lower when carried on your shoulder. The most common sights were the one standing and two folding regulated for 100, 200 and 300 metres.

    Early, pre-WWI stocks has the round knob pistol grip and reinforcing panels on the side of the receiver section. The later models had the flat bottomed pistol grip capped by horn, metal or plastic. The forearm tapered up to the barrel on early models and ended with a slight schnabel on the later models. All had checkering on the grip while the forearm was checkered at an extra cost. There were several Mauser buttplates used with the most common being marked with the "WFM" or the Mauser Banner. Again, they could be horn, metal or plastic.

    The Crown over 'B' proof meant that the rifle was proofed in assembled form.

    The Crown over 'U' is the final inspection proof.

    The Crown over 'G' indicated that the barrel was rifled.

    If you take the barreled action out of the stock you should see several markings for bore and groove diameters, makers marks and maybe even some load information.

    Some Type 'B's were imported to the U.S. but most were made for Europeans.

    This is an excellent rifle for a collector or shooter depending on the actual condition. The cartridge is suitable for anything on the North American continent and is still gaining in popularity here. It is an '06 type case necked up to hold 0.366" bullets.

    Best.

    edited for spelling...
  • dfletcherdfletcher Member Posts: 8,154 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Sorry I can't give any info on the rifle, I'm sure someone else will be along now that photos are posted. Looks very nice.

    I have a CZ 550 in 9.3 X 62 Mauser and it's a nice round. More powerful than a 35 Whelen, not quite as strong as a 375 H & H, but pretty close. Suitable for all large North American game, easy to reload but uses a .366 diameter bullet which can be hard to find. Grafs is best source for those items including brass. All in all it is avery good round.

    Might want to slip a recoil pad on it (removable type) before you let fly with 270 grain bullets at 2,600 fps. It's got a bit of kick to it.
  • evilpuppethead1evilpuppethead1 Member Posts: 11 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Wow nononsense. That's some good information. I really appreciate it. I have some of the original ammunition in the original boxes. I even tried to shoot some. But they were to old and didn't fire. So I have some brass I could reload. Your guys are great. Again, I appreciate it.
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,649 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Don't mean to rain on your parade. It might be the pictures? The stock don't look right to me. Way to rough for a original commercial Mauser. Looks like refinished at least, can't definitely tell about metal though.
  • nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,934 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    evilpuppethead1,

    I never have a problem with folks that doubt because we're working from pictures here, not handling the rifle in real life.

    There is usually one quick check for an original stock. Take the barreled action out of the stock and the stock should have the same serial number as the barreled action. Now, that doesn't guarantee that your stock hasn't been refinished, just that it is a factory original stock. It will take a hands-on look to determine if the finish is original but even then if the re-finisher was expert at his craft, it may be hard to tell even when handling the rifle. If it has been re-finished it will lose some collector value but in my opinion, the fact that it was your Grandfather's and is in as good of condition as it is makes it worth much more, I think. Other than that, the rifle is 80 years old and looks darn good to me from the pictures.

    The barreled action and most of the small parts were rust blued up until about 1930, as opposed to caustic or hot blue. A few small parts were occasionally color cased.

    Best.
  • Dak To 68Dak To 68 Member Posts: 1,404 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I think it's an original stock. May have been refinished, may need blo. That look's like some fine checkering. In any case it's a fine peice.
  • evilpuppethead1evilpuppethead1 Member Posts: 11 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I removed the stock to check if there was a serial number. It did have a matching number. Here's a picture.
    DCP00565.jpg
  • jptatumjptatum Member Posts: 1,911 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The ammunition may not be bad because it didn't fire. Have a gunsmith check it.
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