In order to participate in the GunBroker Member forums, you must be logged in with your GunBroker.com account. Click the sign-in button at the top right of the forums page to get connected.

Steyr Hahn in 9x19

tazzman55tazzman55 Member Posts: 6 ✭✭
edited March 2011 in Ask the Experts
Does anyone know if the recoil springs were changed out when the Steyr Hahn pistols were rebarreled to 9x19? Were some of the original barrels modified to accept the 9x19, instead of rebarreling them? If so, how do you tell if you have a modified barrel? Any help with this would be much appreciated.[}:)]

Comments

  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,649 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The 9mm Luger cartridge has very similar rim and base dimensions to the 9mm Steyr. The only substantial difference is that the SH has a longer overall length. The only thing that needed to be done if the original barrels were altered, IMHO is that the chamber was sleeved for the shorter cartridge. I am not that familiar with the ones that were reworked to 9mm to say if that what was done to them?
  • tazzman55tazzman55 Member Posts: 6 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks for the info. My concern is with the higher working pressure of the 9x19 (vs the 9x23). If they did not install a heavier spring, could it cause the slide to hammer against the frame. I heard that the converted Steyr Hahns can send the firing pin back into the shooters face. What would cause that?[:0]
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,649 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by tazzman55
    Thanks for the info. My concern is with the higher working pressure of the 9x19 (vs the 9x23). If they did not install a heavier spring, could it cause the slide to hammer against the frame. I heard that the converted Steyr Hahns can send the firing pin back into the shooters face. What would cause that?[:0]



    In a older copy of the NRA American Rifleman magazine. There was a short article regarding an accident that occurred when a SH firing pin hit a guy in the face. The only thing that retains the FP in the slide is a small rounded protrusion on the bottom surface of the extractor. If the extractor were to break off just behind behind this surface the firing pin would be able to fly backward out of the slide. A hot load that caused a blown primer that also broke the extractor could cause a very serious accident.
Sign In or Register to comment.