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Colt 45 Revolver

Christine GibsonChristine Gibson Member Posts: 135 ✭✭✭
edited May 2008 in Ask the Experts
Hello,
My name is Christine Gibson. I am not a gun collector. I found this site when I
Googled the words "Colt 45 Revolver." I do not know what information would be needed to
give an approximate estimate,I need a Value....I will give all the numbers and
patent information. The patent information reads as follows:
Pat.Sept. 19, 1871. July 2, 72. Jan. 19.75. The serial (?)
number that I have found is in 4 different places on the gun
and it is 148223. It is a Colt 45, but on the barrel of the
gun it says 41 Colt. It still has some of the blueing on the
barrel. It has only been shot once. I still have a box of
bullets that I purchased 10 or 15 years ago, I have no idea
whatsoever if these are safe to use. Do bullets deteriorate??
Well,thats all the information I have, whoops just found a
different number which is on the ?? thing that you flip open
to load bullets in the chamber and the number is 214. Thank
you for any input you can give me. My email is blessthebeasts
2003@yahoo.com.
Sincerely, Christine Gibson

Comments

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    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    From the patent date and serial number range, your Colt revolver is the Model known as the "Single Action Army". It could be worth a very substantial amount of money, if it's in factory original condition. If you could post some quality photos, it would help our members appraise it's value.
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    rhmc24rhmc24 Member Posts: 1,984 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If you will type Colt SAA in the Gunbroker "search" box you will get some idea of the range of values for you kind of gun. Without getting into a lot detail, you may see that model described in "generations". Yours will be the first generation and the most cherished by collectors. Values run from about $1500 for one in less than average condition to several thousand based on age, condition, originality, construction detail, caliber, provenance, etc. Yours with some original (?) finish intact would place it over the $2000 price range. As "rufe" says, some good pictures will enable the gurus to give you a better fix on all this.

    I have several describeable much the same as your that I value up to about $2500.

    The Gun Broker auction is probably the best exposure you can find to market it. Be aware there are legal requirements, federal and
    perhaps local that have to be considered.

    Hope this helps.
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    Old-ColtsOld-Colts Member Posts: 22,697 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Christine, welcome to the forums. It sounds like you have a Colt Single Action Army based on the patent dates which would be appropriate for the serial number you listed. If so it was manufactured in 1892 and would be considered an antique firearm. If the barrel is marked 41 Colt, what makes you think it is a 45 Colt? Are you basing the "45 Colt" on the looks of the gun? Colt manufactured Single Actions for many different cartridges of which 41 Colt was one.

    It would really help to positively identify your Colt and get some idea of its graded condition and originality, so it you could post some clear and detailed pictures of the Colt it would help us to help you. You have a potentially very valuable gun that can have dramatic value swings based on original vs. refinish and originality of its configuration. It really requires detailed photos posted in this forum to be able to give you any reasonable estimate of value. You can find instructions on posting photos if you look at the top of this forum or follow this link:

    http://forums.gunbroker.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=259294

    You can also get factory information regarding where your Colt was originally shipped, when it shipped, and its original configuration. Here is a link to Colt's Archive Services. From there you can get to the list of available services and the price list, which is from 2005, but as of late last year these prices were still good. Prices are high, $100 for a Single Action Army, but nice to have even if you do not plan to sell the Colt.

    http://www.coltsmfg.com/cmci/historical.asp

    EDIT:

    By the way, assuming this is an 1892 vintage Colt Single Action it is not advisable to fire the gun with Smokeless Powder (modern) cartridges!

    Again, assuming you have a Colt Single Action, there are other marks that would appear on the gun, most notably and visible would be the Address on the top of the barrel. If the barrel length is greater than 4 _ inches it is normally a one line address and if the barrel length is 4 _ inches it will normally be a two line address.

    The number you found on the loading gate (214) is an assembly number, not part of the serial number.

    If you can't feel the music; it's only pink noise!

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    clearmabclearmab Member Posts: 1 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    hi, I found this question/answer string by searching. Have the same model as described in original question; however, serial number is 68396. Any estimate on manufacturing date? It was a gift from a friend about 25 years ago. thanks.
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    Spider7115Spider7115 Member, Moderator Posts: 29,713 ******
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by clearmab
    hi, I found this question/answer string by searching. Have the same model as described in original question; however, serial number is 68396. Any estimate on manufacturing date? It was a gift from a friend about 25 years ago. thanks.
    Your Single Action Army was manufactured in 1881.
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    Christine GibsonChristine Gibson Member Posts: 135 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    To RHME24, RUFE-SNOW, and OLD-COLTS,
    THank you, thank you, thank you for your time and advice. I reall do
    appreciate it.
    Sincerely,
    Christine G
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    XracerXracer Member Posts: 1,990
    edited November -1
    Hi Christine.....just to clarify a bit more.

    What you call your "Colt 45" is actually the "Colt Single Action Army". It first came out in caliber .45 Colt, but was later offered in many, many, different calibers. Your caliber is .41 Colt, a now obsolete cartridge.

    However, even though your Colt is made for blackpowder only, and in an obsolete caliber, it still is very collectable, and, depending on condition and originality, quite valueable.
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    CS8161CS8161 Member Posts: 13,595 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Xracer
    Hi Christine.....just to clarify a bit more.

    What you call your "Colt 45" is actually the "Colt Single Action Army". It first came out in caliber .45 Colt, but was later offered in many, many, different calibers. Your caliber is .41 Colt, a now obsolete cartridge.

    However, even though your Colt is made for blackpowder only, and in an obsolete caliber, it still is very collectable, and, depending on condition and originality, quite valueable.

    I thought the first caliber produced was 44-40?
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    givettegivette Member Posts: 10,886
    edited November -1
    No. .45c chambering. The "Peacemaker" (.44-40) was introduced for sale somewhat later. Best, Joe
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    ruger41ruger41 Member Posts: 14,663 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The .44/40 was introduced in 1878-the .38/40 & .32/20 in 1884 and the .41 Colt in 1885. Ammo IS available to shoot assuming your gun is in good shape(have a competent gunsmith check it) Ten-X makes ammo for it but it is not cheap--$82.99 a box of 20 rounds from Midway and it is loaded with Triple 7 which is a safe blackpowder substitute--absolutely do not fire smokeless powder in that old Colt. You can also buy it directly from Ten-X for $79.99 plus shipping-their website is http://www.tenxammo.com/index.html When you say you have a box of bullets-do you know what caliber they are for--if you look on the end of them they should say a caliber-assuming the box does not say--it is very important that you have the right ammunition to shoot--bad things can happen when you put the wrong ammo in a gun-like it blowing up in your hand and causing injury! You also need to be sure the ammo you bought was BLACK POWDER or a substitute-if you are not sure I would suggest you post pics of it here for us to try to help you with or take it to a gunshop.
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