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Long range scopes

BillOrrBillOrr Member Posts: 99 ✭✭
edited June 2008 in Ask the Experts
So as some of you might know I bought a AR-30 in .300 Win Mag as a "long range" gun. I am wanting to lean to shoot (as it is way more then just the parts) out to ~1000 yard range. Right now I am trying to figure out what power of glass to put on it. I have decided to go with IOR unless someone can give me a good reason not to. I have 2 of the 4-14x50's with MP8 Dot reticule that I really like. I had an older 6-24x50 with the standard MP8 that I liked too but a buddy ended up with it.

I am looking at 2 different ones now and not sure what is the best choice as the price is about $200 different.

First is another updated 6-24x50 with the MP8 Dot
Second is 9-36x56 with the MP8 Dot

I find with the ones I have now I usually run at 10x since that is what the reticule is set for. When I had the 6-24 I found I usually ran at 10x or 20x to make the math easy for hold overs. If I went 9x36 I am thinking I would be at 10x, 20x, and 30x.

I have been half tempted to buy one of the Sportsmans Guide $100 9-36x scopes just to see if it is too much power.

What do you guys think. I know there are a couple of you with lots of experience here and this is new to me.

Comments

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    BillOrrBillOrr Member Posts: 99 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I am new to the long distance shooting world and don't know much about optics and long range scopes. What do the numbers mean i.e.: 8-25x50mm? What do I look for in an optic for shooting over 100 meters? Greater zoom or larger field of view? Large tube (30mm vs. 1 inch)? What kind of reticle should I look for?

    Most importantly: can I find a good one for less than $300 so I can keep my wife happy?

    I found one on cheaperthandirt for about $200:
    8.5-25x50mm
    Yukon Sightmark Tactical Riflescope
    Mil-Dot Reticle
    30mm tube

    does anyone know if this is a good product for a good buy?

    Thanks much for your time and tips, Bill
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    Tailgunner1954Tailgunner1954 Member Posts: 7,734 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    The first 2 numbers are the magnafacation range (3X to 9x, 8x to 25x, etc).
    The 3rd number is the diameter of the objective lense, in mm
    30mm tubes have a larger adjustment range than 1" tubes, due simply to the larger amount of space available.
    Field of view is a function of the power, all scopes (at the same power) will have roughly the same FOV

    How far over 100 meters are you planning to go?
    With optics, you realy do get what you pay for, esp when it comes to quality of glass and coatings.
    With your budget, I'd start with a Leupold 3-9x40 Duplex, and while learning to shoot at distance with that (it'll take you out past 400 meters), save up your pennies for a top quality scope. Don't worry about the reticle, develop a drop chart and learn to count clicks.
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    sandwarriorsandwarrior Member Posts: 5,453 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    BillOrr,

    I will say that if you went with either the bottom of the line Leupold Rifleman, Burris(Fullfield II), or Nikon Prostaff you would have a good scope to start with while you figure out how slice down your groups to competitive sizes. They will run between $150.00 and $250.00 depending on power and obj. You don't need the bigger objective for target work. Or, necessarily the bigger tube. The thing you need to concentrate on now is saving money for the good scope.

    EDIT:

    Guys,

    I feel I need to point something out here. There is a difference between 'cheap' and 'inexpensive'. I would never advocate buying a 'cheap' scope. Cheap as in cheaply made. Poor quality internals that will fail when you need the scope the most. Glass that can't be looked through because of fog in high humidity conditions. Or a distortion that you don't see in the store shows right up when trying to zero in on the buck on the far side of the canyon. Inexpensive on the other hand is a well built scope of adequate quality. The three I mentioned are good. But they don't have the fineness of grind in the lenses. You won't be able to see quite as much as a higher priced scope of known quality. Nor to the have the two or three extra coatings that will allow you to see an animal in the shadows at dusk. You will be able to see the differences when you have looked through both.

    My point in this is you can start with a good solid scope that doesn't cost a small fortune. Once you have decided you can shoot as good as you need to to be competant, then get the high dollar/high quality scope. It's as much a waste of money to go out and buy a Nightforce, USO or S&B only to find out you will never have the drive it takes to get where you want to be in the shooting world. Then have to sell it for half what you paid. They are worth what they cost. But at that cost there needs to be a little justification.
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    NwcidNwcid Member Posts: 10,674
    edited November -1
    Well in the world of scopes, or any glass, cheep and good do not go together. What do you consider long range and what size targets are you planning to shoot? Shooting P-dogs at 100 yards is not hard with 5-10x scopes. Now if you are talking about doing the same thing at 500 + yards you will want as much power as you can get. If you are shooting 2' square steel plates at 500 yards 10x will do you just fine.

    The number or numbers is the zoom or "power" of the scope. Some have a fixed power as in 4x, 6x, 10x ext. Some are adjustable like the one you are looking at, it adjusts from 8.5x to 25x. The second number is the size of the objective lens (the one toward the target) in mm.

    For good glass you will be looking to spend as much if not more on the scope then you will on the gun. On my "Target" AR and my Target M1A I have 4-14x50 mm scopes that cost about $1000 each. The one on my AR was an upgrade from the cheep $150 scope I had on there years ago. Yes there is a huge difference which is why I got the second one for my M1A.
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    JustCJustC Member Posts: 16,056 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    any scope that costs $200 and claims to be a tactical scope is a marketing ploy. The tactical scopes that are actually used by tactical teams run from $1000-$3000.

    The $200 price on that scope won't even buy the lenses in a true long range scope.

    Save your money for a higher end scope. In the mean time, practice with what you have to simply get trigger time until you can step up your glass. By then, you will have more ability to make use of a better peice of glass.
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    GarthGarth Member Posts: 381 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    +1 justc. he is right. after some range time, and not being able to see anything clearly, a cheap scope will almost certainly be thrown in the "junk pile" or it will be put up for sale by a particular auction house(gunbroker). save your money and buy the scope that best assists your rifle. the fact is that a "quality scope" will usually cost nearly twice the expense of a rifle. you truly get what you pay for. best.
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    He DogHe Dog Member Posts: 51,184 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    A cheap scope is simply a waste of money. You seem unclear on what you want to do. 100 meters/yards is not long distace. 300-1000 is and requires different glass. Hunting Elk, p-dogs or punching paper?

    A really good place to start would be here:

    http://tinyurl.com/5rru2h

    You can get a used copy for $10. When you are finished, you will know what you need, what you are looking for and you will be able to help us answer questions here Bill.
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    BillOrrBillOrr Member Posts: 99 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks for your time gentlemen, it is greatly appreciated.
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    11b6r11b6r Member Posts: 16,584 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    And FWIW, there are USED scopes for auction sale, here and elsewhere. Key would be to look for a good brand, and a "right of return"- as well as good feedback numbers on the seller. With some judicious shopping, you COULD pick up a $500 scope for $100 or so. I just picked up a nice Millet 3-9x40 for $20. Spend some time studying, and shop carefully. You may find just what you wanted, with a minor scratch on the tube for a LOT less than new.
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    RCrosbyRCrosby Member Posts: 3,808 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    +1 Nwcid
    All advice given has been excellent, but somewhat limited in the absence of knowing particulars like what you consider long range and what your target will be. Elk at 400 yards? Prarie poodles at the same range? Or paper punching at 600 and more??
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    BillOrrBillOrr Member Posts: 99 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have invested in a Remington 700 in .308 with a nice heavy tactical barrel and an A5 type stock. The goal is to be proficiant with it at 500 yd +, paper and moving target - whitetail and larger. So the glass will have to go out to at least 500, more like 800 or 1000 and be able to give me good FOV and zoom for whitetail and larger.
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