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Unfired Colt 1911, 1940s, original box

Don McManusDon McManus Member Posts: 23,550 ✭✭✭✭
edited June 2008 in Ask the Experts
Local store has a mid-1940s Colt government model, unfired in original box, asking just under $ 3,000.00. This strikes me as a very reasonable price.

Is it?
Freedom and a submissive populace cannot co-exist.

Brad Steele

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    CS8161CS8161 Member Posts: 13,595 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    To me it sounds high...but how many unfired, new in the box 40's era 1911's are you going to come across in your lifetime. I say if you want it, buy it, cause its sure not gonna depreciate! Every year its going to be worth more and more if you keep it new in the box.
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    RCrosbyRCrosby Member Posts: 3,808 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Like the man says, they aren't making any more of those. All I'd add is a word of cautin:
    At that price I'd want stone cold documention of authenticity. If one thing isn't right, you could find yourself in a deep hole.
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    Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,376 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Do you mean a post - WWII commercial gun? It might be worth $3000 in new condition, if solidly backed. But it seems to me that the really big bucks go for nice examples of military surplus.
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    givettegivette Member Posts: 10,886
    edited November -1
    Check with DCM. The SerNo may be in their ledgers. I can't imagine an unfired, still in box, firearm reaching civillian hands [through legitimate channels]. Were there ever such items released to the public as surplus?

    Tough call.

    Best, Joe
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    Don McManusDon McManus Member Posts: 23,550 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks guys.

    It appears a thorough search of its provenance is in order.
    Freedom and a submissive populace cannot co-exist.

    Brad Steele
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    nmyersnmyers Member Posts: 16,879 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The name "Government Model" is Colt's commercial version of the military M1911A1. (It is still made today.)

    There's little point in paying for a factory letter for a (relatively) recent gun that's NIB. All a factory letter could possibly tell you is the date shipped & the retailer. "Provenance" is the documented history of ownership, which you aren't going to get for this gun.

    But, if you don't know how to tell original finish from a "restoration", you might want to post photos for the experts before parting with that much money.

    Neal
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    JKJK Member Posts: 223 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Just dug something out. Maybe it will help
    yr of Colt only
    1941 721978 to 756733
    1942 756734 to 800000
    1943 8001001 to 958100
    1944 1609529 to 1743846
    1945 2244804 to 2380013
    That's as far as I have
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    perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,107 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hello IMHO the price is on the upper limit but not beyond reason. The pistol will go up in value IF YOU NEVER FIRE it. With that said I love 95%-98% guns because you can shoot them "THEIR INTENDED PURPOSE" . they don't have to be treated like a gold bar or work of ART. but to each his own. Be aware I would only buy if I could tell for certain it was ALL original parts and finish.
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