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Gun Value Blue Book Worth Reading???

n/an/a Member Posts: 168,427
edited July 2008 in Ask the Experts
Is this publication of any value? How many 100% older weapons actually exist so why list values?

How is it possible for anyone or group to average out the selling price {value) of thousands of different models and then have the nerve to sell an UPDATEWD book.

Does anyone know how and when this information is compiled and do you agree with the values listed?

Sage 1

Comments

  • nunnnunn Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 34,981 ******
    edited November -1
    I love the Blue Book. I get tickled at the tyros walking the shows with a POS rifle under one arm and a Blue Book under the other. "Book says its worth..." (Book ain't buying, pal.)

    The book is a good source for identifying a gun, but not necessarily for pricing one. I would starve to death if I tried to buy and sell according to the Blue Book values.
  • tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Sage1
    Is this publication of any value? How many 100% older weapons actually exist so why list values?

    How is it possible for anyone or group to average out the selling price {value) of thousands of different models and then have the nerve to sell an UPDATEWD book.

    Does anyone know how and when this information is compiled and do you agree with the values listed?

    Sage 1




    Basically the Blue Book is for semi-informational purposes, and intertainment. It does contain some good referrences, but most of them do not concern pricing or serialization DOM for extreme accuracy.
  • ammo guyammo guy Member Posts: 934 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    In my opinion the values listed are high as compared to what one can really expect to get for the gun in question. As a general gun reference the book is Ok.
  • Old hickoryOld hickory Member Posts: 1,368 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    It's a good book but I only buy it every third year as it doesn't change that often over a few years time. Example Steven's 311 .410 doubles sell quickly at $400 - $500 depending on cond. it took Blue book 4 years to attach a premium to them.
  • MBKMBK Member Posts: 3,503 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I recently got 6 years worth together and did a 75 gun sample of price changes over a 5 year span ending in the '07 book.

    There were 25 rifles, 25 handguns, and 25 shotguns.
    The price change was 8% compounded. But there were large anomalies as each 25-group had 2 or 3 guns with exactly no change or update over the period. I dismissed these which rendered my work a judgement sample rather than random. Then I made sure the included guns were models which were popular enough to be found. My belief is that on these oddball non-collectors, the Bluebook company sort of ignores them or doesn't have a system to force a reprice each year. In that sense all they are doing is listing them for reference.

    ( I frequently check and recheck my guns to see if what I have is that I thought. It is easy to get it wrong the first time you look up a new find. )

    I spoke with Steve Fjestad, the publisher, and he said that right now the top quality finds are coming off the internet and high-end non-gunshow estate dealers and being sold to foreign owners. That is why you see few 100% or 98% guns....the best don't get seen by the general public. I can verify some of this as I am friends with a Colorado-based man in the business supplying these arms to World Buyers. There is little demand for run-of-the-mill typical gunshow quality....most which would be 60-70-80% in the book.

    One thing I have seen is the exporting of Winchester 1897's for Cowboy Shooting now gearing up in Europe.

    One real nice feature about the Bluebooks is the color pictures on gun grading...... a must read from time to time.
  • glabrayglabray Member Posts: 679 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The main purpose of the Blue Book, is to sell "updated" editions every year. It has some entertainment value but I find little correlation between anything in "The Book" and what actually occurs in the gun collecting world.
  • MBKMBK Member Posts: 3,503 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I can't tell you how handy it is to have those books.

    But, say I am driving and pick up a local shopper, see an ad, call and go see the rifles, etc.

    All I have to do is excuse myself, go to the car, open the guide, and POW... I know what I am looking at. More $$$$$ in the collection pocket because I buy below the market if possible.
  • slumlord44slumlord44 Member Posts: 3,693 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    It is an excellent reference for identification, serial #'s, etc. In my opinion the prices are all over the map. Sometimes high, sometimes low, sometimes close to being right. I use it for what it is. On guns that I know nothing about it at least gives me an idea. In many cases on guns that I have an interest in, I know a lot more than the book does. It is always about a year behind no matter what. The Remington Nylon .22's were a good example. They were hot for a year or two before they caught up. It can be a great help if it shows a much lower price than you know is right on a particular gun, and you are dealing with somone with little knowledge of current prices or trends.
  • select-fireselect-fire Member Posts: 62,451 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    It is for reference only. Try and buy some Colts at the price in the book. Then again some firearms are well overpriced. Low production firearms will not truely be represented. In order for them to be truely to be appraised the book has to have sales of those firearms. If no sales no new data gets recorded.
  • RCrosbyRCrosby Member Posts: 3,702 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    MBK,
    You have too much time on your hands...[:D]
    Interesting though,
    Thanks for the info.
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