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Colt Mustang Pocketlite

GuvamintCheeseGuvamintCheese Member Posts: 38,932
edited March 2006 in Ask the Experts
What type of alloy are the pocketlite guns? I have read aluminum and titanium and the blue book just says alloy frame. I am thinking of one for backup...How do they carry? is the short grip a problem for you?

Comments

  • JudgeRoyBeanJudgeRoyBean Member Posts: 282 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Colt has, up until now at least, never used titanium in their guns. The Mustang was built with an aluminum alloy frame. Just what they put into it as the "alloy" part for the aluminum frame, I have never heard. Colt called the original aluminum parts "Coltalloy" in some of their sales literature.....don't know what that means but there will be someone along soon that should.....Hope this is a little help.......
  • nunnnunn Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 35,712 ******
    edited November -1
    Just about all aluminum used in guns, construction, aircraft, etc. is an alloy. Mostly aluminum with some other stuff mixed in to make it more suitable for its intended purpose.
  • tr foxtr fox Member Posts: 13,856
    edited November -1
    Frankly, aluminum frames have always worried me (I've got several). Aluminum is a soft, brittle metal. Now I know that they add various metals, etc. to make it better than regular aluminum, but strangely enough the key word is still "aluminum." Whether they add the word "alloy" or what ever, the main and key word is "aluminum".

    I don't like or trust aluminum except for storm door, windows, tent poles, ladders, etc.
  • Rafter-SRafter-S Member Posts: 2,173 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I had one and now wish I had kept it. Used it as a backup, and for when I needed a very small pistol. The alloy frame makes it light weight for carrying. The short grip is no problem for what the little gun is intended, i.e. short range personal protection. To insure reliability I loaded it with FMJ ammo.

    Hope this helps,
    Rafter-S
  • Ray BRay B Member Posts: 11,822
    edited November -1
    I have a Mustang with a steel frame and slide, so I can't help much about the alloy, but with regard to the smallnes of it, if I try to shoot it with one hand, I'm holding it with my trigger finger and the next two, my litle finger curls under the magazine. Shooting it this way makes followup shots difficult, because the gun tends to torque around, pointing to the side; however, if I hold it witgh two hands, then it is held where it is supposed to be and firing a magazine through in rapid fire is no problem.
  • select-fireselect-fire Member Posts: 69,482 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    tr fox.. if airplaines were made of steel they would never get off the ground for the weight. Alum. can be hardcoated or treated to be as hard as steel. Have no clue how Colt does it.
  • tr foxtr fox Member Posts: 13,856
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by select-fire
    tr fox.. if airplaines were made of steel they would never get off the ground for the weight. Alum. can be hardcoated or treated to be as hard as steel. Have no clue how Colt does it.


    Well that makes sense, but I have often noticed I hear about "stress fractures" in airplane airframes. And a semi-auto gun frame is under a whole lot of stress each time the gun is fired. In fact at one time the polymer frame guns were advertised as one of the selling points is that the polymer frame will flex and therefore avoid suffering from possible damage as with a metal frame which will not flex.

    But if it works then it works and I sometimes do worry about things more than I should.
  • jimfulcojimfulco Member Posts: 8 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I've had a Mustang Pocketlite for 14 years, and it fits in the back pocket of Levi's just right. I rounded off the sharp corners at the muzzle end, trimmed the slide lock & safety, and made a "holster" from a Tandy Leather wallet back.

    It works well with Federal Hydra-Shoks, both feeding and shooting. It has much less muzzle flip than my old Sig P-230, even though it weighs a good bit less. Locked breeches rule, for sure.

    The only thing you might not like is the safety. It does not inspire confidence when I pull the trigger and the safety moves slightly toward the "off" position. I don't use it anyway, so it's not a big deal for me.
  • JudgeRoyBeanJudgeRoyBean Member Posts: 282 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Ever seen a "stress fracture" in a steel frame gun? OOopps, steel guns don't "crack" or "break"....... Do they???

    "Coltalloy" was a proprietary name given to Colt's way of mixing its aluminum alloy framed guns. What exactly was mixed with the aluminum and how much wasn't disclosed in any of their literature, to my knowledge. Of course, my knowledge is limited as Colt never really asked me for my opinions. Have had some experience with shooting of their "Coltalloy" framed guns and have never had any problems in many thousands of rounds fired. However, I have personal knowledge of one "handloader" that was able to "stretch" one out of shape enough as to make it un-safe to use further. Interesting to note here, the "Stretched" gun would have probably still been rendered unuable if it had been made of steel......or it would have shattered because its material was more brittle.......who knows?
  • sig232sig232 Member Posts: 8,018
    edited November -1
    It is interesting how we worry about the stress on the alum pistols and relvolvers, but then you look at the Glocks and see the slide riding on four little tiny pieces of metal attached to the frame. What the heck keeps that slide from jumping off that frame and hitting you in the face. Go figure!

    I have several lightweight 45's, 380's, and S&W revolvers with lightweight frames. I follow the mfg instructions and keep the hot stuff out of the guns except for defensive carry and they have not had any problems for over 35 years. Love them! For defense they are great. For target work I prefer the weight of steel.

    My humble opinion, of course.

    Sig232
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