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Krag Carbine?

Don McManusDon McManus Member Posts: 23,125 ✭✭✭✭
edited October 2011 in Ask the Experts
http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=257341028

My 'The American Krag Rifle and Carbine' states the production of these firearms officially ended at S/N 474693 in November of 1903, but then goes on to state that upwards of 499,036 may have actually been produced.

Anyone know of a resource that may provide insight as to whether S/N
479102 is/was an original Carbine?
Freedom and a submissive populace cannot co-exist.

Brad Steele

Comments

  • cbyerlycbyerly Member Posts: 689 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    The rifle in question is a parts gun made from several differrent rifles. The only carbine part is the Model 99 striker rod. There were over-runs in the receiver production and spares made so it is possible that the number was one of those since it's on a parts gun.
  • jjmitchell60jjmitchell60 Member Posts: 3,887
    edited November -1
    I have one that is carbine length but was cut down by Springfield for use at a prision. It has the mark for the prison on it, wonder how many were done like that? I know a true carbine should also have the carbine reear sight on it if I am not mistaken. The one in the auction is not a true carbine, even the ones cut down of the 1898s for military use had the saddly ring on them, which that one does not, according to the web site dedicated to Krags.
  • Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,319 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Not an original carbine with that big barrel band front sight.

    jj, there are a LOT of non-arsenal carbine length Krags out there. Benencia Arsenal shortened rifles for NRA sales, and no telling how many independent gunsmiths cut rifles down to look like carbines for handy hunting carry.
  • Spider7115Spider7115 Member, Moderator Posts: 29,704 ******
    edited November -1
    Probably a "Bannerman Special". They made a lot of "carbines" from surplus parts as they were popular for hunting.

    I see a lot of these so-called "carbines" listed. The lack of a saddle bar and that front sight are dead giveaways. Only the Model 1899 did not have a saddle bar. That gun is worth around $500 and certainly nowhere near the price of the genuine article.
  • stegsteg Member Posts: 871 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    What many collectors don't know about Krags is that when the '03 Springfield was adopted, Francis Bannerman & Co. bought up all the spare parts from the Government at lower than scrap metal prices.
    Fast forward to 1939 when WWII broke out. Great Britain was not prepared for war and had a severe shortage of small arms. When Japan attacked British colonies in Asia, the Brits used the last arms in their arsenals to arm the Indian Colonial Army and had nothing left to arm their Home Army. Into the breech steps Bannerman, who sent a letter the Churchill asking if they would be interrested in Krags. Of course the answer was yes if Bannerman could also provide ammo.
    Bannerman then hired several warehouse buildings in up-state NY and assembled around 100,000 Krags from spare parts and shipped them along with 100 rounds of Krag ammo per rifle/carbine.
    Even so, Bannerman still had enough spare parts to assemble Frankenstein Krags which they sold to the public until they closed shop around 1958-59.
  • vrichardvrichard Member Posts: 102 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Don McManus
    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=257341028

    My 'The American Krag Rifle and Carbine' states the production of these firearms officially ended at S/N 474693 in November of 1903, but then goes on to state that upwards of 499,036 may have actually been produced.

    Anyone know of a resource that may provide insight as to whether S/N
    479102 is/was an original Carbine?

    ser.# for the Krag carbine 112864 to 133919
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