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Ruger Blackhawk pistol

YUKONYUKON Member Posts: 717 ✭✭✭✭
edited March 2014 in Ask the Experts
is what I just bought at a local gun show . Never had one , but always wanted to deer hunt with one ,I'm tired of carrying a rifle with my arthritis I use a cane. What would be the best ammo to start shooting with. I am an avid shooter just not with a 44 mag. Any thoughts?

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    62fuelie62fuelie Member Posts: 1,069 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Without pictures it isn't possible to tell exactly what you have - Blackhawk, Super Blackhawk, Redhawk, Super Redhawk are all made in .44 Mag. The cartridge is appropriate for deer if you learn to handle it properly and respect the limitations of your ability and the round. There are several loads suitable for deer from several manufacturers. It will be a matter if finding what shoots best for you and your pistol. Optics can be mounted on many of the Rugers and may or may not suit you. I would start out with a milder load, maybe even .44 Special to get used to the mechanics of firing the pistol then start looking for a hunting load.
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    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    44 mag, high velocity, heavy bullet, hunting loads. Aren't easy to shoot, from a Blackhawk. Without a lot of practice.

    As the previous posted noted. Best to start with light .44 Special loads, and work with them. Until you become proficient. Than you can transition into the heavier 44 mag loads.
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    charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 6,579 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Two things need to happen. You need to develop the muscle to hold the pistol out and to over come the flinch factor from full tilt 44 mag loads. If you can find them, the Speer plastic cases and bullets will let you train your muscles with ammo powered by only primers. Holding your pistol out and engaging a target their training ammo will help. I still use mine on occasion just for that purpose.

    You could start with 44 Special and move up to full 44 mag loads. You might consider learning to reload. Lyman 429421 245 grain cast bullet on top of BlueDot has taken ELK.

    You might try a neck sling. 1 inch tubular nylon flat strap, loop around neck or under one arm and over the other shoulder. It can be held in between the grip and your right hand. The goal is to have the strap tight when you are pushing the pistol fully out into position. You can also hold it in the left hand as it supports your right.

    Hunting distance is how ever far you can reliably explode 1 gallon milk jugs full of water or put holes in a 7 inch paper plate.

    added A friend had 7 Redhawk's all bought new. 2 were really good shooters, there rest were ok for boat anchors. I tend to only shoot one re-load in any of my handguns and its near the top end. In rifles its the same story (but its whatever shoots best) and I usually have a trigger time cast bullet load to the mix.
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    YUKONYUKON Member Posts: 717 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks we'll see what happens The ammo is a little pricey. I'll report later on in the spring as soon as the frickin snow is gone from NE PA
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    asopasop Member Posts: 8,928 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Deer hunted for 20 years using my 10" Ruger with a Leupold 2X. Reloaded 300 gr. copper H.P. set out to upper ring, with Win. primer and 25 grns. of 296 powder. DEADLY.
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    MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 13,863 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Don't know where you're affected by "Arthur" but he(or one of his relatives) has a good hold on my hands, elbows, and shoulders. Shooting a 44 mag is close to torture in my case.
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    YUKONYUKON Member Posts: 717 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Arthur is in both hips. Really bad in the right one due for replacement. Sorry didn't have the gun with me it is a redhawk 44 mag
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    tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by YUKON
    Arthur is in both hips. Really bad in the right one due for replacement. Sorry didn't have the gun with me it is a redhawk 44 mag


    That is even better yet. It is a stout double action revolver, and most likely in 44 Magnum, as it was the most popular chambering. It was made in 357 Magnum, 41 Magnum, and 45 Colt also.

    If the grips are not comfortable to you, go to Hogue grips, and look around...they will have some that you like, most likely.

    One more thing...I am not sure if you handload/reload, but if you do, you have the best of both worlds, as these do not have to be loaded to a "rocks & dynamite" loading to be a good hunting gun...in fact most of my hunting revolvers are only loaded to about 75%...easy on the shooter, and still ample power.

    Best
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    beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 12,776 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Question is, what's best ammo for an older guy with hip arthritis to start shooting a .44 magnum revolver with?

    Answer: "It depends"

    If you're an experienced handgun shooter, and your ARMS, WRISTS and SHOULDERS are OK to the point where you have no issues shooting conventional revolver or handgun rounds, you can probably start with whatever you like.

    While .44 magnum is certainly a lot LOUDER than most of the non-magnum rounds, personally, I don't find recoil to be all that punishing, **from the big all steel heavy guns**.

    This is a big subjective, obviously, but I find .357 magnum and the like from smaller/compact guns to be harsher recoilwise than .44 magnum from the big all steel magnum revolvers. What you do is get a good strong two handed grip, pull the trigger, and allow the entire gun to ride up on recoil, so that when you're done with the shot, the muzzle is pointing somewhat upward. Make sure you have smooth grips on the revolver to prevent hand abrasion. Softer rubber grips designed to soak up magnum revolver recoil are good. Some people like to wear a shooting glove to decrease perceived recoil with these. Scoping the gun also adds weight, again increasing stability and decreasing recoil.

    If maybe you don't have a lot of experience firing other handguns, or you're simply not sure, then the thing to do is start light and then work up gradually to full power rounds.

    Obviously, if you have the ability to (re)load your own ammo, you can start with relatively weak loads (EG considerably weaker than .45ACP power) and then gradually work your way up from there to full power loads, as you get more and more accustomed to the recoil and blast.

    If you are restricted to BUYING commercial ammo, the absolute weakest loads for a .44 magnum revolver aren't .44 special, but actually .44 RUSSIAN. Unfortunately, 44 Russian ammo isn't all that easy to find (most of the big manufacturers don't make it) and when you can find it, it costs roughly the same as the .44 special. But these rounds are pretty fun from a big magnum revolver, giving recoil maybe equal to a .38 special from a big heavy gun.

    Next step up would be .44 special, which gives you approximately the same ballistics as a .45ACP or .45 (long) Colt. But from a big heavy revolver like a Blackhawk, recoil is still relatively mild. Its usually a little easier to find .44 special (any good gunstore will have some), but again unfortunately ammo cost is typically right up there with .44 magnum, so you get to pay full price for reduced performance.

    And lastly, as mentioned, you don't really need the "bear killer" uber-maximum .44 magnum rounds for hunting ordinary deer. So long as you keep range reasonable and place your shot well, pretty much ANY "hunting" type 44 magnum round should be plenty good enough.
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    He DogHe Dog Member Posts: 51,080 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    .480 might have been a better choice for you. Recoil is more of a heavy push like a muzzleloader than a sharp kick. Plenty of good bullets made for it too.
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    YUKONYUKON Member Posts: 717 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    My everyday carry is a kimber ultra pro II 45 and I shoot all the time. Also the gun does have a scope on it. My shoulders and hands are fine grip is good. Thanks for the input
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