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If you own a WWII Jap rifle

p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
edited August 2005 in Ask the Experts
The following site will allow you to interpret the markings. Japanese rifles (IMO) are up and comming collectables. They are now where Nazi rifles were in the '70''s.

Markings on Japanese Arisaka Rifles and Bayonets of World War II
Address:

http://www.radix.net/~bbrown/japanese_markings.html




wings2.gif
Stolen from, and with thanks, to Kiwibird

Comments

  • HAIRYHAIRY Member Posts: 23,606
    edited November -1
    Thanks--quite useful site.

    Volenti non fit injuria
  • v35v35 Member Posts: 13,200
    edited November -1
    It just goes to show that given time even trash becomes collectible.
    Next we can expect Carcano values to skyrocket.
  • XracerXracer Member Posts: 1,990
    edited November -1
    While many of the wartime Arisakas (especially the late war ones) were pretty crude, I've seen some pre-war examples that were quite nicely made.

    And.....the Arisaka action is probably the strongest military bolt action design ever built.
  • v35v35 Member Posts: 13,200
    edited November -1
    Urban legends die hard and The Rifleman started that one.
    I've shot many thousands of '06, 173 gr M1 Ball through them and modified them pretty extensively. While they wont readily blow up, they stretch to excess headspace within 500 rounds of military ammo.
    The safety breeching is a nice feature but at best they are roughly made,loose toleranced, crude rifles; the best of them in the Carcano class. As souveniers, an uncle captured may be an excuse to own one but otherwise they are JUNK.
    At one time when there was a scarcity of centerfire bolt actions some of them were modified to sporters but that time is long past.
  • p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by v35
    Urban legends die hard and The Rifleman started that one.
    I've shot many thousands of '06, 173 gr M1 Ball through them and modified them pretty extensively. While they wont readily blow up, they stretch to excess headspace within 500 rounds of military ammo.
    The safety breeching is a nice feature but at best they are roughly made,loose toleranced, crude rifles; the best of them in the Carcano class. As souveniers, an uncle captured may be an excuse to own one but otherwise they are JUNK.
    At one time when there was a scarcity of centerfire bolt actions some of them were modified to sporters but that time is long past.




    I think I will go with American Rifleman and my own observations. Thanks for you imput that adds nothing pertinent to the thread.


    wings2.gif
    Stolen from, and with thanks, to Kiwibird
  • Cornflk1Cornflk1 Member Posts: 3,719 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    A very fine site as far as some quick and informative info concerning WW2 Jap rifles.

    Wouldn't necessarly consider all japanese rifles as "junk" early rifles were very well made and their actions were as well made as any during the first part of the war. Quality suffered as the war progressed and quality materials as well as time constrants (the need to supply arms to troops in the field.
  • GrasshopperGrasshopper Member Posts: 16,017 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Piece of history to be had for a couple hundred bucks! BARGAIN, if you are in to something that involved the world at war! Late war crude rifles are very interesting of the short cuts made for the war non machine...imo...nambu
  • v35v35 Member Posts: 13,200
    edited November -1
    As to possessing piece of history you may have a point but intrinsicaly none of them can compare with any of the Mausers, Springfields, Enfields, Krags or Moisine Nagants in fit, finish or metalwork.
    They were scorned as junk by gun people since they first came in as war trophies and were regularly sold for $15 or so. Today they are available,cheap historical artifacts and nothing more - collected for their markings. Attempts to dignify any of them as a quality rifle are a real stretch.
    For a reality check, see what a good 6.5 or 7.7 sporter conversion will bring at your local gun store.
    A little perspective on these weapons as rifles is at least as pertinent to a discussion of the rifle as an academic study on their markings, as they are guns not art.
    My extensive experience with them was with higher quality 7.7s that were US Arsenal converted to 30-06 for the Korean Service Corps. I cut them down to carbine length, mounted scopes, converted them to cock on opening, mounted muzzle brakes and did trigger and stock work. They made for a light, powerful, accurate rifle for forays into Korean mountains. These rifles were headspaced to minimum 1.946 and went to 1.951 after 500 rounds like clockwork. They were only designed for 43or 45KPSI and the US service cartridge is about 50KPSI.
    While these rifles won't blow up with a blue pill they do stretch to unserviceability with the US service 30-06 M1 Ball, NRA kudus notwithstanding.
  • p3skykingp3skyking Member Posts: 25,750
    edited November -1
    v35, you will be known as a butcher in times to come. Congratulations.


    wings2.gif
    Stolen from, and with thanks, to Kiwibird
  • HAIRYHAIRY Member Posts: 23,606
    edited November -1
    v35: Hmmmm--quote:These rifles were headspaced to minimum 1.946 and went to 1.951 after 500 rounds like clockwork. They were only designed for 43or 45KPSI and the US service cartridge is about 50KPSI. So, according to you, instead of using the designed load, we overloaded it and found out that it cant' handle the load and changes the headspacing!

    Amazing discovery--anyone ever figure it out to use the correct load? Duhhhhhh.


    Volenti non fit injuria
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