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AK Slant brake rusted/corroded in place

jplooksterjplookster Member Posts: 96 ✭✭
edited November 2011 in Ask the Experts
Just bought a type 56s preban Chinese AK. Good price and cosmetically very good but [V] a Crappy description by seller. Anyhow the problem is;

Moderate pitting on gas piston and the slant brake will not budge not even a wiggle. Probably a result of the same issue that caused the piston pitting. Not cleaned after firing corrosive ammo. The chrome bore and chamber don't seem affected but I won't know about the muzzle till I get the brake off.
I've been soaking the muzzle/brake with Kroil and alternating with Butchs Bore shine and tapping it with a brass hammer no luck yet. Should I use heat?? Just dremmel it off or use vise grips or ???

Comments

  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,649 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Since the brake itself is toast anyway, I wouldn't lose any sleep about saving it. Clamp the barrel/gas tube assembly upside down between wooden blocks in a bench vise. Heat the brake with a propane torch. Make sure the spring loaded retaining pin is disengaged from the brake. Have at it with a pipe wrench. Unless it's been welded or red locktighted on, don't see it not coming off.

    EDIT #1, It's not clear from your response if the end of the barrel has the spring loaded retaining pin? This is used on the preban Chinese imports to hold the muzzle brake in place. If your's doesn't have this feature it might be a latter post ban rifle with a welded/silver soldered? muzzle brake that has been altered to pre ban configuration.
  • gunnut505gunnut505 Member Posts: 10,290
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by rufe-snow
    Since the brake itself is toast anyway, I wouldn't lose any sleep about saving it. Clamp the barrel/gas tube assembly upside down between wooden blocks in a bench vise. Heat the brake with a propane torch. Make sure the spring loaded retaining pin is disengaged from the brake. Have at it with a pipe wrench. Unless it's been welded or red locktighted on, don't see it not coming off.


    Sometimes the most important parts are skimmed over and missed due to improper size/color.[:D]
  • jonkjonk Member Posts: 10,121
    edited November -1
    Get some evapo rust and soak it in that. You might be surprised how good it turns out. Then wash in hot soapy water, dry thoroughly, and re-blue with whatever. If you still want to take it off, after soaking in the evaporust it should be a lot easier.

    For penetrating oils, Kroils is great but acetone and transmission fluid mixed works even better according to some, you could try that. Failing everything, yeah, just heat it up and buy a new one.
  • HangfireHangfire Member Posts: 3,010 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I use a 50/50 mixture of acetone and transmission fluid.. Only mix enough for your project since acetone evaporates so quickly, the shelf-life is short..
  • v35v35 Member Posts: 13,200
    edited November -1
    Use a punch on the retaining plunger and see that it's pushed in before turning the slant brake off COUNTER CLOCKWISE.
    Scrape the gas port with the tool provided or buy one. A .177 wire brush
    is good for that purpose.
  • jplooksterjplookster Member Posts: 96 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks all!

    I'll continue the chemical attack and order a new brake. If I dont have it off when the new one arrives I'll use a pipe wrench.
  • jplooksterjplookster Member Posts: 96 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks everyone. Chemical attacks failed miserably. So I removed the spring and plunger from the sight base then clamped it in a barrel vise. I applied lots of heat with a propane torch and used a small pipe wrench. It took three cycles with Kroil and heat but it finally let go. So after cleaning the threads up the new brake looks and works as it should.

    I learned that "excellent condition" and "lightly used" can mean different things to the two parties of an exchange. I guess I should have asked more questions.
  • tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by jplookster
    Thanks everyone. Chemical attacks failed miserably. So I removed the spring and plunger from the sight base then clamped it in a barrel vise. I applied lots of heat with a propane torch and used a small pipe wrench. It took three cycles with Kroil and heat but it finally let go. So after cleaning the threads up the new brake looks and works as it should.

    I learned that "excellent condition" and "lightly used" can mean different things to the two parties of an exchange. I guess I should have asked more questions.

    Life in general is a learning experience. I strive to try to learn something new everyday. The only way to truly accomplish that is to ask questions, and be very accepting of new information before you make any judgement calls.

    In a recent post of mine, I made mention that some parties think that a gun that has 20% of its finish left is near 100%, just because it is 100+ years old...or something similar to that. It is important that you get that situation squared around with the seller before you bid or buy.

    Best
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