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Winchester Model 1873 in 38 WCF Part #2

antne56antne56 Member Posts: 36 ✭✭
edited September 2012 in Ask the Experts
Being there was some editing to the OP I felt I should get more opinions on the Condition of the rifle.


Also what value would you put on this gun in Very Good Vs. Good ?
Again thanks for everyone's input.
Tony

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    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    This is a link to your original topic.

    http://forums.gunbroker.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=570490


    My take on your rifle is that it would be considered a Shooter grade because of the cleaning of the external metal surfaces.

    Not likely to have much in collectors value. Flayderman assigns a value of $875 to good condition, 3rd Model 1873 rifles. As over 700,000 73's were made in total, a shooter grade one wouldn't be a big buck collectors item.



    EDIT #1, Don't have a clue as to how many 73's still are out their. Since they were made and sold by Winchester well into the 20th Century, ( World War One, time frame ), probably still a bunch floating around.
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    antne56antne56 Member Posts: 36 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    rufe-snow, thanks for the response.
    another question I have is there any idea on how many rifles survived thru the years.
    I know the number produced was over 700,000.
    Just wondering what that number would be today 89 to 139 years later.
    Thank,
    Tony
    quote:Originally posted by rufe-snow
    This is a link to your original topic.

    http://forums.gunbroker.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=570490


    My take on your rifle is that it would be considered a Shooter grade because of the cleaning of the external metal surfaces.

    Not likely to have much in collectors value. Flayderman assigns a value of $875 to good condition, 3rd Model 1873 rifles. As over 700,000 73's were made in total, a shooter grade one wouldn't be a big buck collectors item.
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    tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hi Tony,

    As your rifle sits, it is in the "Very Good" condition, and if the rifling is as crisp as the rest of the gun, then you are looking to at least $1500.00, and closer to 2K, would be my opinion. With a factory letter, it would even add more...exponentially more than the letter itself costs.

    How many survived? That would be a good one to toss at Bert, as he would have a better handle on that. However, IMHO, there is no way anyone could ever possibly know that.

    How did you make out with the sticky's at the top of the expert's? Hope you enjoyed the reading.

    Best
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    kimikimi Member Posts: 44,723 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    My WAG is about two grand give or take, based on a grading condition of Good, and the review of several publications having to do with condition, price, and "cleaned" metal.
    What's next?
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    antne56antne56 Member Posts: 36 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    tsr1965,
    I read the stickeys, lots of good stuff. The more I search,
    in my opinion the more interesting this topic becomes.

    I'v always loved guns,and to have one that is 125 years old just makes it all the more interesting.And to me that's priceless.

    Would love to get the gang together for a drink and just talk the history of Winchester and model 1873's.
    Regards,
    Tony

    quote:Originally posted by tsr1965
    Hi Tony,

    As your rifle sits, it is in the "Very Good" condition, and if the rifling is as crisp as the rest of the gun, then you are looking to at least $1500.00, and closer to 2K, would be my opinion. With a factory letter, it would even add more...exponentially more than the letter itself costs.

    How many survived? That would be a good one to toss at Bert, as he would have a better handle on that. However, IMHO, there is no way anyone could ever possibly know that.

    How did you make out with the sticky's at the top of the expert's? Hope you enjoyed the reading.

    Best
  • Options
    Bert H.Bert H. Member Posts: 11,279 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Tony,

    Take it from me, that rifle is easily graded as "Antique" Very Good, and it is worth very close to $2,000 as it sits today. Other than the loss of bluing due to cleaning it, the rest of the rifle is in exceptionally nice condition. All of the markings are very sharp and clear, it has its original factory sights, and the stocks are in better than VG condition. It is definitely better than "shooter grade".

    In regards to how many Model 1873s still exist... at least a few hundred thousand. They are still very commonly found today.
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    antne56antne56 Member Posts: 36 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Bert,
    Glad to hear your opinion on the grade and value of my 73.
    As I said before I feel lucky to have obtained such a storied rifle.

    Maybe someday i will have a professional restoration done.Until then I will enjoy my 73 ,and I do intend to shoot it.
    Thank you for your time and all the invaluable information.
    Tony

    quote:Originally posted by Bert H.
    Tony,

    Take from me, that rifle is easily graded as "Antique" Very Good, and it is worth very close to $2,000 as it sits today. Other than the loss of bluing due to cleaning it, the rest of the rifle is in exceptionally nice condition. All of the markings are very sharp and clear, it has its original factory sights, and the stocks are in better than VG condition. It is definitely better than "shooter grade".

    In regards to how many Model 1873s still exist... at least a few hundred thousand. They are very common still today.
  • Options
    antne56antne56 Member Posts: 36 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    tsr1965,
    I am going to take your advice and get the factory letter for this rifle, being i will be keeping it in the family for hopefully many years to come i feel it would be beneficial.
    thanks,
    Tony

    quote:Originally posted by tsr1965
    Hi Tony,

    As your rifle sits, it is in the "Very Good" condition, and if the rifling is as crisp as the rest of the gun, then you are looking to at least $1500.00, and closer to 2K, would be my opinion. With a factory letter, it would even add more...exponentially more than the letter itself costs.

    How many survived? That would be a good one to toss at Bert, as he would have a better handle on that. However, IMHO, there is no way anyone could ever possibly know that.

    How did you make out with the sticky's at the top of the expert's? Hope you enjoyed the reading.

    Best
  • Options
    v35v35 Member Posts: 12,710 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Col Charles Askins' book Gunfighters brings out the significance
    of the 1873 Winchester in Western history. It was THE rifle of the '70s
    and '80s, the height of the wild west, for good and bad and both cowboys and Indians.
    Yours is worth a good restoration even if it has to be financed.
    You haven't mentioned bore condition. If it's doggy, it can be reamed and rerifled to 44-40 in the original style.
    The restorer can remark it perfectly.
    I used to be a '92 fan but now I need an 1873 carbine or short rifle in 44-40.
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    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    "Cleaning", i.e. the removal of the original finish, by some misguided person, kills it's value as far as knowledgeable collectors are concerned. Unless the knowledgeable collector can get it cheap enough so it can bought for restoration. Or to be sold at a profit to a less knowledgeable individual as a representative piece.

    Anybody can spin it any way they please, but the above is gospel, as far as I'm concerned.
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