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cleaning

rangerange Member Posts: 554 ✭✭✭
edited April 2014 in Ask the Experts
can you clean a barrel too much and hurt it or take out the rifling? How tight should the bush fit when cleaning

Thanks

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    rangerange Member Posts: 554 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    should i clean a new ruger 380 lcp before i go to the range?
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    Ditch-RunnerDitch-Runner Member Posts: 24,777 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    just me but I clean and oil / grease every gun I get new or old , I like to do it just as a over all view of the firearm and make sure the bore is clear
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    rangerange Member Posts: 554 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
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    asopasop Member Posts: 8,928 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I do the same thing as "Ditch-runner" . When I take a firearm to the range or hunting however I always fire a "fowling" shot just to clear the barrel of any lub. that may be present.
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    navc130navc130 Member Posts: 1,217 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Should not be necessary. A patch thru the bore to wipe out any oil/grease is all that is required. I would not clean it for 200 to 300 rounds; other than the bore. It is important to know if it will function when not in perfect condition, which it should.
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    45er45er Member Posts: 245 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    range,

    I do, also. Clean 'em when I get 'em, new or used.

    Yet unlike Dutch-runner, at the range before firing, take clean, fresh cleaning patchs and wipe the oil out of the barrel until no more sign can be seen. This for having heard somewhere's along the line that not doing so can be detrimental to the barrel?

    Regardless, one way or another, it's a last minute check before firing that the barrel is indeed clear of any foriegn matter. A habit I've adhered to.

    Another case in point to clean, besides getting familiar with a new-to-you firearm-- eons ago bought a brand new Remington 700. Got it home and the bolt would not lock up a round properly, had to struggle with it. Not right. Come to find from the factory that not all the bluing salts had been washed away around the chamber face!

    45er
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    charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 6,579 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Wouldn't hurt to field strip it and check for burrs then a good cleaning with and new oil/grease.
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    tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Despite that It "should not be necessary", they do not come from the factory, or retailer, prepped and ready to go. I general takedown, degreasing, and re-oiling, can solve a lot of preliminary issues.

    Best

    EDIT 1

    quote:Read the instructions first.
    IIRC some pistols come with a "break in" lube on certain points (Glock comes to mind), and that lube should NOT be removed until a number of rounds is fired.
    That said, and considered a exemption to the rule, always clean and lube before taking out the first time.

    With the Glock, they recommend, before firing it when new, to field strip it, wipe it all clean...including that copper colored lube, and then oiling it, as prescribed here...

    http://us.glock.com/documents/gun_maintenance.pdf

    But reading the instructions to know this is a must.

    Best
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    Tailgunner1954Tailgunner1954 Member Posts: 7,734 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Read the instructions first.
    IIRC some pistols come with a "break in" lube on certain points (Glock comes to mind), and that lube should NOT be removed until a number of rounds is fired.
    That said, and considered a exemption to the rule, always clean and lube before taking out the first time.
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    beantownshootahbeantownshootah Member Posts: 12,776 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by range
    should i clean a new ruger 380 lcp before i go to the range?


    In an ideal world (ie fantasy land) You shouldn't "have to", but in my opinion, yes you should.

    New guns can contain grease, metallic dust, and other grime in there that can prevent them from working right out of the box. I've seen any number of guns (including a Glock) that wouldn't run right out of the box, but worked 100% after an initial clean and lube.

    Also, part of learning to run ANY new gun is learning how to take it down and clean it, and no better time to do that then right when you get.
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    nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,928 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    range,

    quote:should i clean a new ruger 380 lcp before i go to the range?

    Yes, of course you should.

    You would be amazed at what manufacturers have left in a firearm when it leaves the factory. It makes no sense whatsoever to NOT clean a firearm before shooting it. Besides, as properly pointed out, the process to takedown and cleaning familiarizes you with the firearm right from the start. The best start is to read the manual and follow their suggestions then give it a good cleaning. The cleaning will not hurt it and it might save hurting your firearm without it.

    Enjoy the entire process!

    Best.
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