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What was my Dad hoping to get?

keithmichigankeithmichigan Member Posts: 311 ✭✭✭
edited December 2011 in Ask the Experts
What was my Dad hoping to to get. My Dad bought a taurus Model 62 22 cal. pump rifle. He said to me at one time that a friend of his had a rifle that he really liked. Back then a lot of the kids in grade school used to bring their guns with them to school. I don't know what it was but he may have mentioned Remington. I think that he said that the taurus was supposed to be a reproduction. This rifle in my opinion seems to be a piece of crap.
I would like to see if I can find the original rifle that he had the affection for.
I would like to see if I could find the rifle type that he really wanted and give it to him as a present. That would be a good day for both of us.

Comments

  • gunnut505gunnut505 Member Posts: 10,290
    edited November -1
    Look for a Winchester model 60 or 61 on the auction side.
  • Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,320 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The Taurus Model 62 is a foreign copy of a Winchester Model 62.
    What a coincidence, hey?

    He might also have had an 1890, 1906, or 62A, they are all exposed hammer Winchester pumps and look much the same at first glance.
    The older models are fixed as to caliber, an 1890 .22 Short won't shoot Long Rifles, for example, and the .22 WRF is a completely different round. But the 1906, 62 and 62A are S,L,LR.

    A nice gift, it won't be cheap.
  • merrbarbmerrbarb Member Posts: 138 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hello Keith: A Winchester repeater, slide action, pump .22 rifle, Model 62A or 62 (the model 62 was produced from 1932 to 1938; the 62A from 38 through 59) that has a carrier that loads .22 S, L, LR interchangably is the likely candidate. As mentioned, the 1890, 90, 1906 or 06 would likely have been present during his school years. The 62/62A used the same receiver as the 90 and the same shell carrier as the model 06. So they looked a lot alike.

    The Remington Model 12 did not have an exposed hammer but would have been present with the earlier Winchesters.

    Times have changed. I, too, traded for rifles and pistols in high school. This was in the early 50s. We had our own "show and tell". I would not advocate anything like that today - times have, sadly, changed.
  • keithmichigankeithmichigan Member Posts: 311 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by merrbarb
    Hello Keith: A Winchester repeater, slide action, pump .22 rifle, Model 62A or 62 (the model 62 was produced from 1932 to 1938; the 62A from 38 through 59) that has a carrier that loads .22 S, L, LR interchangably is the likely candidate. As mentioned, the 1890, 90, 1906 or 06 would likely have been present during his school years. The 62/62A used the same receiver as the 90 and the same shell carrier as the model 06. So they looked a lot alike.

    The Remington Model 12 did not have an exposed hammer but would have been present with the earlier Winchesters.

    Times have changed. I, too, traded for rifles and pistols in high school. This was in the early 50s. We had our own "show and tell". I would not advocate anything like that today - times have, sadly, changed.

    Doing the math it seems that the Model 62 Winchester was the one.
    Thank all of you that have helped with this. I learned quite a few things. The knowledge that you guys have is amazing.
  • spasmcreekspasmcreek Member Posts: 38,925
    edited November -1
    got three of the rossi/taurus repros and all work fine...any decent up original will cost an arm & leg
  • keithmichigankeithmichigan Member Posts: 311 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by spasmcreek
    got three of the rossi/taurus repros and all work fine...any decent up original will cost an arm & leg

    When it comes right down to it I think what bothered me the most about the Taurus was the silly little stamped metal safety on the top of the receiver. From pictures of the Winchester I guess that they didn't have a safety other than the hammer
  • Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,320 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Real Winchester pumps do not have a safety other than the half cock on the hammer.
    I have seen pictures of Rossi lever actions with that breechbolt safety deleted, I guess the same approach would work on the pump.
  • keithmichigankeithmichigan Member Posts: 311 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Hawk Carse
    Real Winchester pumps do not have a safety other than the half cock on the hammer.
    I have seen pictures of Rossi lever actions with that breechbolt safety deleted, I guess the same approach would work on the pump.

    By deleted,do you mean removed completely. I actually thought about doing that.
    On the half cock, What is the purpose of that? The only thing that I have thought is that possibly it would keep the hammer from fireing in the event that the hammer was struck from behind. Some times I look to deeply into reason and miss the obvious it seems.
  • v35v35 Member Posts: 13,200
    edited November -1
    The half cock was the sole safety on hammer rifles, pistols and revolvers and shotguns.
  • tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    That Taurus 62 is about the only decent Taurus I have owned. The rest I got rid of. The one I have is a little stainless carbine in 22LR. It is a great shooter.

    It is a mimmick of the Winchester 62 slide action rifle. Unlike the Winchester it has a safety on top of the breech bolt, that I have seen ground off, and it has a rebounding hammer system. The Hammer also has a keyed lock that is integral in it.

    Best
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