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Early Iver Johnson??

SP45SP45 Member Posts: 1,758 ✭✭✭
edited May 2014 in Ask the Experts
I came across an early Iver Johnson double barrel shotgun. I can't find any reference in the blue book or Flaydermans.

1, 12 Gauge double barrel hammerles damascus barrels. I can't find any reference to them offering damascus barrels.

2, Model is Champion and no info on a double named champion only a single barrel.

3, Name on the gun is Iver Johnson Sporting Goods, Boston Mass. Cant find any reference to this address only Worcester and Fitchburg.

Any Ideas???

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    rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,650 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Check it for Belgian proof marks. Carder's shotgun book notes that I.J. made doubles, in Fitchburg MA. Nothing about Boston, or that they were marked Champion.
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    SP45SP45 Member Posts: 1,758 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    No proof marks, On the water table it says Patent Applied For. A roller on the bottom of the receiver to take the barrel off. Iver Johnson marked on the bottom of the receiver. Champion on the side. Bores are almost mint which is unusual for a black powder era gun.
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    hrfhrf Member Posts: 857 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The late Bill Goforth's Iver Johnson book notes that I.J. opened a sporting goods store in Boston 1896, and sold other manufacturers arms including some imported from Europe.

    It would be logical for them to use the Champion brand name on imported doubles since they already used it on their singles.
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    SP45SP45 Member Posts: 1,758 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    very possible. My understanding is that all damascus barrels were made in Europe and imported to various gun makers. As they were just tubes they would have no proof marks which would mean that he guns were made in the U.S. Why they would make damascus guns at that late date when everyone was turning to solid steel seems a little unusual. THanks for the help.
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