In order to participate in the GunBroker Member forums, you must be logged in with your GunBroker.com account. Click the sign-in button at the top right of the forums page to get connected.

6.5 CM

JohnnylikesgunsJohnnylikesguns Member Posts: 2,887 ✭✭
edited April 2019 in Ask the Experts
Been looking at buying a 6.5 CM bolt gun.

No hurry but taking all suggestions on make /model

Not going to be used for hunting --paper and steel I already have plenty of hunting rifles.


I have a 30 cal suppressor so a 5/8 x24 threaded barrel would be a plus.

Would like to stay at $2000 or under.

Next will be glass for it.

Comments

  • toad67toad67 Member Posts: 11,450 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a Bergara BMP in 6.5 and love it... Also just bought a little Ruger American Predator over the Holidays for $300 in 6.5 and it shoots most ammo under an inch, and some under .5 inch.
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,348 ✭✭✭
    edited March 2019
    So is that the 6.5 Creedmoor? I'm not sure a 30 cal. suppressor will do much with a .264 bullet passing threw a .308 hole, but maybe you can get different guts for your can. You might check the regs on that to be sure to stay on the good side of the law.

    added Interesting. Thanks. I have little suppressor experience. Uzi in 9mm and 45 ACP back in the 90's. Does the oversize hole cause any loss of accuracy?
  • dfletcherdfletcher Member Posts: 8,148 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I just bought the Bergara B14 in 6.5 Creedmoor. I also have an older Ruger 77V in 6.5 Creedmoor. The Bergara is all "tactical" with a detach magazine set up while the Ruger is conventional. I like both but the Bergara is one heck of a bargain and quality rifle. Excellent trigger right out of the box, adjustable stock - LOP and cheek piece. It uses conventional AICS box mags. ACT, Ruger, PMag manufacture brands are easy to find and inexpensive.

    The threading is 5/8X24.

    Bergara also sells a higher end version, don't recall the model number. LGS are selling those for about $1,700.00.

    You might also want to consider a Cooper. Might be stretching that $2K limit to its max. I bought a Model 21 in 222 Remington. Quite the accurate work of art.
  • toad67toad67 Member Posts: 11,450 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    dfletcher wrote:
    I just bought the Bergara B14 in 6.5 Creedmoor. I also have an older Ruger 77V in 6.5 Creedmoor. The Bergara is all "tactical" with a detach magazine set up while the Ruger is conventional. I like both but the Bergara is one heck of a bargain and quality rifle. Excellent trigger right out of the box, adjustable stock - LOP and cheek piece. It uses conventional AICS box mags. ACT, Ruger, PMag manufacture brands are easy to find and inexpensive.

    The threading is 5/8X24.

    Bergara also sells a higher end version, don't recall the model number. LGS are selling those for about $1,700.00.

    You might also want to consider a Cooper. Might be stretching that $2K limit to its max. I bought a Model 21 in 222 Remington. Quite the accurate work of art.

    Agree 100% on the Bergara's, they are well worth the money. I currently have 5 of them, and am looking to buy more... Hard to beat an Ed Shillen design on a Remington 700... :)
  • MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 12,678 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    "So is that the 6.5 Creedmoor? I'm not sure a 30 cal. suppressor will do much with a .264 bullet passing threw a .308 hole, but maybe you can get different guts for your can. You might check the regs on that to be sure to stay on the good side of the law."

    There may be some loss of noise reduction but it would take an actual sound meter to notice the difference. I've run .224, 6.5mm. 6.8mm and.308 through a 30 caliber muffler and all were fairly quiet. The .224 wasn't as quiet as with a dedicated .22 muffler but was definitely ear safe.
  • nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,935 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Johnnylikesguns,

    I think this cartridge is simply the best choice today for availability and selection of rifles, ease of use, easy reloading, factory ammunition quality, etc. Personally, I would use a good search engine to locate a lengthy list of bolt action rifles chambered for the 6.5 Creedmoor and go to work reading the reviews. There is a wide selection of styles with which you have to contend to arrive at your choice. Decide whether you will be shooting off of a bench or while lying on the ground shooting prone. The best style will vary by the position you choose.

    While the vast majority of shooters will benefit from choosing the 6.5 Creedmoor, I would look at the 6.5x47 Lapua cartridge as a step up in the accuracy department. The drawback is the smaller number of models available or making the choice to go with a custom.

    Best.
  • MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 12,678 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    "I think this cartridge is simply the best choice today"

    While lots of folks today think that, I think the popularity is 75% marketing hype and 25% real world performance.
    In the beginning, paper punching performance was enhanced by carefully prepared rifles and ammo. Over the last 2-3 years, rifles and ammo have gone toward the price point mentality with performance following the "corner cutting".
    At this point, the 6.5 C is just another spot on the rack to be replaced by another "newest and best" soon.
  • tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Mobuck wrote:
    "I think this cartridge is simply the best choice today"

    While lots of folks today think that, I think the popularity is 75% marketing hype and 25% real world performance.
    In the beginning, paper punching performance was enhanced by carefully prepared rifles and ammo. Over the last 2-3 years, rifles and ammo have gone toward the price point mentality with performance following the "corner cutting".
    At this point, the 6.5 C is just another spot on the rack to be replaced by another "newest and best" soon.

    I think those percentages you are using should be reversed...real world performance is that it hits the shoulder like a 243, beyond 400 yards hits harder than the 308, or 30-06, all while shooting flatter than the fabled 270 Winchester. The cartridges design is of inherent accuracy, and that has been proven with all the MOA or better price point rifles out there. Go on the auction side, and see what is the most listed chambering for a bolt gun...

    Now for the Original Poster...

    Last fall I purchased a Bergara B-14 HMR, at of all places, but Gander Outdoors. I only did so after talking with a dear friend who frequents this board. I purchased the $29.00 Good Sam's Club membership, and got $81.50 off the rifle, that was priced at $815.00, or @ $130.00 under MAP Price. This rifle has a full stock length Aluminum strut, and a mini chassis for taking a magazine. It is a very solid rifle. Mine wears a Vortex Viper PST Gen II, 5-25x50. It shoots under 1MOA with all the loads I tried, and with its pet load, it consistently shoots under 1/2 MOA. Yes, they make the HMR Pro too, but I am not sure what the difference is, and how much more you can expect.
  • nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,935 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Mobuck wrote:
    "I think this cartridge is simply the best choice today"

    While lots of folks today think that, I think the popularity is 75% marketing hype and 25% real world performance.
    In the beginning, paper punching performance was enhanced by carefully prepared rifles and ammo. Over the last 2-3 years, rifles and ammo have gone toward the price point mentality with performance following the "corner cutting".
    At this point, the 6.5 C is just another spot on the rack to be replaced by another "newest and best" soon.

    The 6.5 Creedmoor has been around for 10+ years and has been proven in most uses to be a successful and accurate cartridge using both factory ammunition and handloads. The naysayers all seem to deny this success, pointing to the marketing and promotional exercises which Hornady uses to put this cartridge forth to the public, as being a bad thing.

    Hornady has refined and sharpened their promotional efforts with this cartridge to the point where the cartridge has achieved a substantial portion of the shooting public pie. The number of brass suppliers and their volume of production is at an all-time high. The amount of positive reports and accolades disturbs the naysayers because they find it necessary to rebel against a successful campaign of promotion. They are overwhelmed by the positives and want to be the minority as the detractors, in an attempt to seem special. Unfortunately, the truth wins out and the 6.5 Creedmoor IS a success as is it's smaller brother the 6mm Creedmoor. You can add into this pair, the .22 Creedmoor which is an amazing long range cartridge when combined with the high BC bullets and an excellent competition cartridge on top of that.

    And like petulant children, the negatives will stomp their feet and yell about how wrong we all are. Let them have their say but remember that the truth is in the sales numbers.

    Best.
    Far as I'm concerned, all Hornady did was reinvent the wheel, when the brought out the CM. The Sweads beat them to he punch, 126 years ago. With comparable rifles and ammo. IMHO under 500 yds, not going to be a RCH difference between the 2.

    The very same masterful response could be made regarding dozens of cartridges 'created' throughout the years and decades. It is the subtle modifications which advance the art and science of ballistics, not the blockbuster announcements of a totally new cartridge set free on the market.

    The difference here is that Hornady created a new cartridge which is what .260 and the 6.5x55 can only wish they should have been.

    Best.
  • rufesnowrufesnow Member Posts: 250 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Far as I'm concerned, all Hornady did was reinvent the wheel, when the brought out the CM. The Sweads beat them to he punch, 126 years ago. With comparable rifles and ammo. IMHO under 500 yds, not going to be a RCH difference between the 2.
This discussion has been closed.