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Scope with Adjustable Objective

Horse Plains DrifterHorse Plains Drifter Member, Moderator, Sr. Moderator Posts: 37,619 ***** Sr. Moderator
edited April 2019 in Ask the Experts
Is a scope with an adjustable objective something that will give a common shooter any advantage? I am looking at two scopes, a Leupold VX3 3.5-10 X 40, or a VX3 4.5-14 X 40. Looking at used scopes, the AO seems to add $75-$100 to the price. Just wondering if it would be money well spent, or not. Rifle will have a 26" barrel chambered in 6.5/06, and be used for hunting, and informal target shooting. TIA for any input.

Comments

  • babunbabun Member Posts: 11,497
    edited November -1
    AO scopes are helpful if you are shooting at know distances. They help with parralex problems.
    They allow a better scope picture because you adjust the focus to the range of the target.
    I used a 20 power scope on my .22 target rifle to shoot at paper at the range of only 50 feet.
    Without the AO, the bulleyes would not have been bright and the crosshairs would be
    "moving"
    So if you know what range you are going to shoot at, the AO might be your choice.
    Your call.....

    eW1gzE8l.jpg
  • BobJudyBobJudy Member Posts: 4,944 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I just did the same with a 10/22 build (worls class of course :D ) so that I could adjust for rimfire distances. That being said if you are hunting long distance being able to correct for paralax can be beneficial also. All of my longer range hunting and prairie dog guns have AO. Having AO won't hurt and may come in handy. Bob
  • dfletcherdfletcher Member Posts: 8,148 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Centerfire rifles without AO are generally set at 100 yds, rimfires at 50 yds. Regarding the AO and known distances, that's true. However even at other distances one can "dial in" and focus.

    For most larger game hunting and the occasional sighting in I would say a non-AO is fine. Then again, once you try an AO scope the difference is noticeable. Other point to consider regarding AO is that they tend to add width to the front bell, or are found on those that are wider, and require higher mounts resulting in a less than ideal cheek weld.
  • waltermoewaltermoe Member Posts: 656 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The higher the magnification the more pronounced the parallax. A high magnification has it's place but you will need to steady the rifle more. I have had AO scopes and non adjustable scopes, to me the secret is to always have your scope lined up to your eye the same each time you shoot, and then you don't have to worry about adjusting the for parallax for each time you shot.
  • Horse Plains DrifterHorse Plains Drifter Member, Moderator, Sr. Moderator Posts: 37,619 ***** Sr. Moderator
    edited November -1
    Thanks all, for the thoughts/advice!
  • toad67toad67 Member Posts: 11,450 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    IMO an A/O scope is well be worth the few extra bucks for your intended use. From my personal opinion/use, I like the side focus better than the A/O on the objective lens. It seems to keep me better on target. If you are looking to spend a lower $ amount look at the Vortex diamondback hp models..
  • hillbillehillbille Member Posts: 12,775 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    just as a side note, I had cataract surgery and now have 20/20, but have to use readers from arms length in. the adjustabe objective does help to clear the crosshairs up with the background, I do hunt out of a box blind so adjusting to set lengths is easier than if you were walking or push hunting, for what it is worth they do help me, your vision and mileage may vary......
  • Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,317 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    AO is valuable with high power scopes.
    The numbers seldom match the actual parallax free range.

    I was very disappointed with Leupold side focus. I cannot get parallax and focus both right at the same time
  • tsr1965tsr1965 Member Posts: 8,682 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    babun wrote:
    AO scopes are helpful if you are shooting at know distances. They help with parralex problems.
    They allow a better scope picture because you adjust the focus to the range of the target.
    I used a 20 power scope on my .22 target rifle to shoot at paper at the range of only 50 feet.
    Without the AO, the bulleyes would not have been bright and the crosshairs would be
    "moving"
    So if you know what range you are going to shoot at, the AO might be your choice.
    Your call.....

    eW1gzE8l.jpg

    The markings on the scopes objective for distance, are for reference only...not defacto. But yes there is an advantage, especially with higher power scopes, that will magnify parralex problems. Most common scopes without the parralex adjustment are set there about for 100 yards. The adjustable objective lens, and on newer models with side focus, are for just that...dial until your image is into sharp focus, thus dialing out the parrelax for the shooter's eye.
  • RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,539 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Anything over 10 I like AO or side focus
  • TRAP55TRAP55 Member Posts: 8,278 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    hillbille wrote:
    just as a side note, I had cataract surgery and now have 20/20, but have to use readers from arms length in. the adjustabe objective does help to clear the crosshairs up with the background, I do hunt out of a box blind so adjusting to set lengths is easier than if you were walking or push hunting, for what it is worth they do help me, your vision and mileage may vary......
    hillbillie, try it with low power reading glasses, it clears up the cross hair, and you can see the target clear as well.
This discussion has been closed.