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Refrig/Freezer in garage,,,

montanajoemontanajoe Member, Moderator Posts: 51,119 ******
edited June 2019 in General Discussion
do you put a wax or something on the outside of your garage refrig/freezer,to prevent rusting??

Comments

  • FrogdogFrogdog Member Posts: 2,117 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I wouldn't worry about it. I have had a Montgomery Ward freezer in my garage for 20 years in a coastal environment (and it was already about 25 years old when I bought it). Rust has never been a significant issue for it. The few times I have noticed little specks of rust forming, I just hit it with a quick spray of white Rustoleum. Looks like new and runs great!
  • Old-ColtsOld-Colts Member Posts: 22,475 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    We've never used a protectant and we've never had a problem; desert, coastal, or here in the Piney Woods of East Texas.

    If you can't feel the music; it's only pink noise!

  • bigal125bigal125 Member Posts: 1,134 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Going by my experience, dust and other garage stuff (sawdust, pet fur, dust bunnies, cobwebs, etc, etc...) are more likely to be a problem than rust. Keeping it clean has always been more difficult, and more important to keeping it running, than keeping it waxed and shiny.

    Big Al ( ... and what are you going to be keeping in YOUR garage fridge/freezer?) :) :?:
  • Mark GMark G Member Posts: 1,501 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    We have one in the garage at our vacation home. It was the main one in the kitchen when we bought the house and we bought a new one for the kitchen and moved this one to the garage. Coastal area and never a problem with rust.
  • hillbillehillbille Member Posts: 11,386 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    mine seems to rust on the top, more of a condensation issue as there is a a/c vent directly over the fridge, It is an old one so as someone else says every 6 months/year I just hit it with a shot of rustoleum and it is good to go, got an old towel folded up on the top to wipe it down if it gets real bad.
  • Bubba Jr.Bubba Jr. Member Posts: 6,486 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Is your refrigerator designed for placement in a cold area? If your garage is not insulated and heated, you may want to rethink placing it there.

    Here's a quote from an internet source. I can also verify this information as I tried to do that years ago. It didn't work out so well.

    Most refrigerators stop working at some point during the winter months in an unheated garage, depending on climate and how well the garage is insulated. Most manufacturers do not recommend placing a refrigerator in temperatures below 50 degrees Fahrenheit. Doing so could cause the freezer portion to thaw frozen food, the refrigerator portion to freeze food or both. Additional precautions include allowing the fridge to adjust to room temperature before turning it on after it's delivered or moved.
  • BrookwoodBrookwood Member Posts: 7,847 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Bubba Jr. wrote:
    Is your refrigerator designed for placement in a cold area? If your garage is not insulated and heated, you may want to rethink placing it there.

    Here's a quote from an internet source. I can also verify this information as I tried to do that years ago. It didn't work out so well.

    Most refrigerators stop working at some point during the winter months in an unheated garage, depending on climate and how well the garage is insulated. Most manufacturers do not recommend placing a refrigerator in temperatures below 50 degrees Fahrenheit. Doing so could cause the freezer portion to thaw frozen food, the refrigerator portion to freeze food or both. Additional precautions include allowing the fridge to adjust to room temperature before turning it on after it's delivered or moved.

    I have kept a refrigerator in my northern Michigan unheated\uninsulated garage for a few years. I use it mainly to keep water and beer cold during the summer months. Also use the freezer for overflow keeping meat used for backyard barbeques and picnics. Popsicles and frozen treats for our grandkids.

    When cold weather hits us in the Fall, I empty the fridge, unplug it, and place a couple of towels draped over the top holding the two side by side doors slightly open. This keeps mold from forming inside.

    So far, it works fine for what my needs are.
  • Mr. PerfectMr. Perfect Member Posts: 59,601 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a stainless model in my garage now, but all the previous ones were painted (white or black), so I have never felt the need to provide my own protective coating.
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  • asopasop Member Posts: 7,250 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The "old" refers had brass components that had no problem functioning in below freezing temps. The new ones went plastic/nylon and just can't function in those low temps :shock:
  • Smitty500magSmitty500mag Member Posts: 12,899 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    We've had a refrigerator in our garage for the past 7 years with no problems with the paint and we live in a humid area.

    I thought I had a problem with it when I first put it out there because it quit running on the first day but come to find out I had it plugged into a ground fault receptacle that would trip when the motor kicked on. I plugged it into a regular receptacle and it never quit running again.
  • BeeramidBeeramid Member, Moderator Posts: 7,238 ******
    edited November -1
    No rust on mine, in a South Louisiana garage.
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