.

J.C. Higgins 583.17 Bolt

GunswapperGunswapper Member Posts: 786 ✭✭
I need a complete bolt assembly for a 12 gauge J.C. Higgins bolt action shotgun model 583.17. Any help will be appreciated.

Comments

  • mrmike08075mrmike08075 Member Posts: 11,828 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Just in case - are you certain that it's not the defective Sears model that was recalled - where many folks turned the bolt in???

    I have two bolt action shotguns including one from Sears and it works fine - I believe that the recall serial number range notice is still floating around online...

    Mike
  • babunbabun Member Posts: 11,497
    edited November -1
    Missing the bolt because it was sent in for a $50 gift card?????

    Unsafe to shoot unless it was the newer model after 1949/1950. Very few newer models were made, Replaced by a different gun.
    Don't shoot it.

    https://www.gunvaluesboard.com/value-of-j.c-higgins-12-gauge-mod.-583.17a-shotgun-13637946.html
  • hoosierhoosier Member Posts: 1,081 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Originally a $160.00 recall on the shotgun, by sending in the bolt assembly (no replacement available).
    Because over 12,000 bolts were sent in, Sears changed in 2008 to a $50.00 gift card.

    Screw on side would snap off. Firing pin retaining pin would break, Both would allow bolt to come back in the shooters face. Side of the receiver where the bolt was would shear off.

    We sent in over 50 bolts for the $160.00, we cut down the barrels and made wind chimes . We did not sell parts due to liability reasons.
    We often get folks calling wanting a bolt for a Shotgun they bought cheap......

    Sears Issues Voluntary Recall on J.C. Higgins Shotgun

    HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill., March 13 /PRNewswire/ -- Sears, Roebuck and Co.
    (NYSE: S) today announced a voluntary recall of J.C. Higgins Bolt Action
    12-Gauge shotguns, a product manufactured for and sold by the company during
    the 1950s.
    The shotguns are being voluntary recalled due to a potential problem with
    the bolt latch assembly, which could cause the assembly to fail allowing it to
    dislodge and strike the operator in the face. Sears is offering a $160
    finders' fee for the return of the bolt, making the shotgun inoperable.
    The shotguns were sold in Sears stores and through its catalog as the
    "J.C. Higgins Bolt Action 12-Gauge Model 10 Shotgun" during the 1950s. It was
    carried under a number of product numbers: 583.13, 583.14, 583.15, 583.16,
    583.17, 583.18, 583.19, 583.20, 583.21 and 583.22. The product model number
    is engraved on the barrel of the shotgun.
    Consumers are advised to immediately stop using the shotgun. Call
    800-817-9165 for identification verification and instructions on return
    procedures.
    Magazines, Gun Parts and More.
    US Army Veteran
    NRA Patron
  • GunswapperGunswapper Member Posts: 786 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Since the bolt handle locks the bolt in the receiver it seems to me the only time the bolt can come back is after the handle is lifted clear of the notch in the receiver. The screw in the side of the receiver simply prevents the bolt from being pulled out of the receiver when ejecting a fired shell and loading another shell in the chamber. If someone pulled the bolt back with enough force to shear the screw and hit himself in the face with the bolt it seems he was looking to file a lawsuit! Just my opinion.
  • hoosierhoosier Member Posts: 1,081 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Side of the receiver where the bolt handle would lock down, would shear off. You can find some photos on the net.
    Magazines, Gun Parts and More.
    US Army Veteran
    NRA Patron
  • GunswapperGunswapper Member Posts: 786 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I bought a bolt and stock advertised as a 12 Gauge J. C. Higgins model 583.18 thinking it would fit my 583.17. Turned out to be for a 16 Gauge. According to this: http://www.histandard.info/manuals/sears/bashotguns/index.html the 583.17 is 12 gauge; 583.18 is 16 gauge; and 583.19 is 20 gauge. Still looking for a bolt for the 583.17 12 gauge.
  • babunbabun Member Posts: 11,497
    edited November -1
    Take a grinder or welder to your wrong 16 gage bolt and make it fit the gun.
    Put the bolt in and then hang the gun on the wall.
    The receiver did not get any stronger these last 70 years.
    IT IS UNSAFE TO SHOOT.
  • GunswapperGunswapper Member Posts: 786 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    The 16 gauge bolt is already too small in diameter. Grinding would only make it smaller.
  • John StimsonJohn Stimson Member Posts: 26
    edited November -1
    Just in case - are you certain that it's not the defective Sears model that was recalled - where many folks turned the bolt in???

    I have two bolt action shotguns including one from Sears and it works fine - I believe that the recall serial number range notice is still floating around online...

    Mike

    The Sears J. C. Higgins Model 10 did not have serial numbers unless they were exported.
  • John StimsonJohn Stimson Member Posts: 26
    edited September 2019
    babun wrote:
    Missing the bolt because it was sent in for a $50 gift card?????

    Unsafe to shoot unless it was the newer model after 1949/1950. Very few newer models were made, Replaced by a different gun.
    Don't shoot it.

    https://www.gunvaluesboard.com/value-of-j.c-higgins-12-gauge-mod.-583.17a-shotgun-13637946.html

    The guns being recalled were actually the second generation bolt actions referred to internally at High Standard as the BA2. The earlier BA1, models 583.1 through 583.12, were OK. The BA2 appeared about 1948 and the recalled versions continued until the 583.23 which appeared in 1954. This last design of the BA2 was not recalled. and was produced until it was replaced by the Model 11 which had a forged receiver. The Model 11 appeared in 1957.

    Sears actually made a BA2 583.17 12 Gauge and a BA2C 583.17A. The former was available with either a modified choke or a full choke. The latter had an adjustable choke. The 583.17A was not included in the Sears recall list and should have been.

    The Model 10's were actually produced in fairly large numbers since it was the cheapest way to get a repeating shotgun.
  • John StimsonJohn Stimson Member Posts: 26
    edited November -1
    hoosier wrote:
    Originally a $160.00 recall on the shotgun, by sending in the bolt assembly (no replacement available).
    Because over 12,000 bolts were sent in, Sears changed in 2008 to a $50.00 gift card.

    Screw on side would snap off. Firing pin retaining pin would break, Both would allow bolt to come back in the shooters face. Side of the receiver where the bolt was would shear off.

    We sent in over 50 bolts for the $160.00, we cut down the barrels and made wind chimes . We did not sell parts due to liability reasons.
    We often get folks calling wanting a bolt for a Shotgun they bought cheap......

    Sears Issues Voluntary Recall on J.C. Higgins Shotgun

    HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill., March 13 /PRNewswire/ -- Sears, Roebuck and Co.
    (NYSE: S) today announced a voluntary recall of J.C. Higgins Bolt Action
    12-Gauge shotguns, a product manufactured for and sold by the company during
    the 1950s.
    The shotguns are being voluntary recalled due to a potential problem with
    the bolt latch assembly, which could cause the assembly to fail allowing it to
    dislodge and strike the operator in the face. Sears is offering a $160
    finders' fee for the return of the bolt, making the shotgun inoperable.
    The shotguns were sold in Sears stores and through its catalog as the
    "J.C. Higgins Bolt Action 12-Gauge Model 10 Shotgun" during the 1950s. It was
    carried under a number of product numbers: 583.13, 583.14, 583.15, 583.16,
    583.17, 583.18, 583.19, 583.20, 583.21 and 583.22. The product model number
    is engraved on the barrel of the shotgun.
    Consumers are advised to immediately stop using the shotgun. Call
    800-817-9165 for identification verification and instructions on return
    procedures.

    The failure was the receiver crack. A secondary failure when the bolt started back was the bolt retaining screw being sheared off.

    Sears clearly did not know just what to recall because they specified the guns to be 12 gauge and then included the model identification numbers for not only the 12 Gauge gun but the 16 gauge and 20 gauge as well. However they failed to include the 583.17A which is a 12 Gauge. High Standard closed several years before the recall. The failures were well known to Sears and High Standard well before High Standard closed as there were suits over the injuries form the failures.
  • John StimsonJohn Stimson Member Posts: 26
    edited November -1
    Gunswapper wrote:
    Since the bolt handle locks the bolt in the receiver it seems to me the only time the bolt can come back is after the handle is lifted clear of the notch in the receiver. The screw in the side of the receiver simply prevents the bolt from being pulled out of the receiver when ejecting a fired shell and loading another shell in the chamber. If someone pulled the bolt back with enough force to shear the screw and hit himself in the face with the bolt it seems he was looking to file a lawsuit! Just my opinion.

    I have posted pictures of a fractured receiver on my website and I have copies of many documents related to the failure. With the bolt handle support part of the receiver sheared off the bolt does come back and shears off the bolt retaining screw on its way to the shooter. The injury was real and sometimes significant and yes there were suits.

    Not my opinion. Historical facts.
  • pip5255pip5255 Member Posts: 1,558 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    389779_5efdc25d39b150a830b0d611931827e3.jpg389779_64796c91714b3449941ae15d3e7369ac.jpg
    just because you could doesn't mean you should
  • GunswapperGunswapper Member Posts: 786 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Close this post. I bought a J.C. Higgins 583.16 parts kit on the auctions. The bolt fits & works perfectly. Thanks for all input. :D
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