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Barrel Diameter for Threading

dfletcherdfletcher Member Posts: 8,154 ✭✭✭
I'm going to attach a flash hider, not a brake, to a barrel that is .550 diameter at the muzzle.  I'mm doing this by hand and that diameter is a bit too much for me to do by hand with a 1/2X28 die.  This is mostly for cosmetic reasons, the rifle is a .224 diameter bore.  Which threading size die is best for cutting by hand?  Doesn't much matter to me if it's LH or RH, AK type, FAL type.  A 5/8X24 threading die is too big.  A 9/16X24 seems like the best fit, but I'm wondering if a .224 diameter TAT can be found.

Comments

  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,346 ✭✭✭
    I have tapped and die a lot of threads by hand, but I would find a machine to cut those threads if accuracy in shooting is important to you.   Improper alignment could really hurt accuracy IMHO.
  • nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,934 ✭✭✭✭
    dfletcher,
    Here is the straightforward answer.
    The muzzle of a rifle barrel (crown) is the last point of contact with the bullet. Any deviation from exact perpendicularity, no matter how small, will have a negative affect on accuracy. Have no doubt of this as we've tested this and discovered the same affect when inaccuracy is questioned and the loss of perpendicularity is found to be the culprit.

    Threading for any muzzle device requires a lathe and threading tools and absolute attention to concentricity and perpendicularity. This is not an opinion but straight up fact and I don't care if the firearm is lesser quality or top end. You need to forget the threading die and move forward by using a lathe and a proper set up for accuracy to get these threads cut.

    Best.


  • dfletcherdfletcher Member Posts: 8,154 ✭✭✭
    I appreciate the responses and should have clarified.  The gun in question is an old High Standard.  Will be used indoors with "ratshot" and 22 shorts by an older fellow who has decided either he or the mice must go.  I think it's a bit silly, but he'd like it.  My only concern with the shot was it rattling off the device.
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,346 ✭✭✭
    Well that does change things a little. A flash hider for what? The rats/mice are shooting back? I would soft solder on a threaded bushing.  The old Routledge bore would do a way better job with birdshot.  CB caps would be choice over shorts.
  • MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 12,967 ✭✭✭✭
    There are devices that fit inside the bore and sort of maintain alignment when starting the threads. Unless intending to use  suppressor with close to bore diameter internals, this would be good enough. If using such a device, I would grease the bore spud well before inserting.
  • nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,934 ✭✭✭✭
    Mobuck said:
    There are devices that fit inside the bore and sort of maintain alignment when starting the threads. Unless intending to use  suppressor with close to bore diameter internals, this would be good enough. If using such a device, I would grease the bore spud well before inserting.
    I have no intention of being rude or contentious with regard to any answers I make here although words alone can often be misconstrued without hearing the words spoken.

    There is a decided difference between amateur viewpoints and work undertaken by amateurs as opposed to the work/ viewpoint of working professionals with knowledge, skill and experience. There is also a difference between 'you can do something' and 'you shouldn't do something'. The word can does not necessarily mean that you should.

    Long to short, just because a tool exists to supposedly accomplish a task, does not make it the proper tool or method to use to work on a task. Simply stating that this is a 'old High Standard to shoot rat shot', does not excuse the need for the proper process to thread a muzzle. Trying for cheap and easy is not an excuse for low quality work. Most flash hiders have a groove size section just in front of the muzzle which will potentially deflect the initially released shot pattern as it opens when leaving the muzzle. This is not safe, period.

    Rats in a house are never an excuse to open fire inside a house, rat shot or not. Hire an exterminator to handle rats or any other vermin. Eliminate the reason the rats are there so they don't come back.

    Best.





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