.

‘Splain this.

forgemonkeyforgemonkey Member Posts: 20,101 ✭✭✭
Continuing with the .25-25 Stevens.
The original five cartridges were loaded without sizing the brass. In all five the bullet would just start in the case and  seated the remainder of the way via the seating die, with a slight roll crimp. All chambered, fired and extracted fine.
Thus, I resized/sized ‘all’ cases and belled the case mouth slightly, and then primed, and used 5.5gr. of Trail Boss under an 82gr. lead bullet with gas check.

All loaded cartridges were difficult if not impossible to push into the chamber. Question, why would the non-sized new cases with seated bullet chamber and all the ‘sized’ cases with bullet seated be difficult ??

One more added dynamic,,,,,,,I removed the de-capping pin and carefully resized the loaded cartridges.
They all drop in the chamber without hesitation. I’ll hazard a guess they have all the ‘neck tension’ needed.




Comments

  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,351 ✭✭✭
    I think the "new" cases were/are undersized a little.  Belling the case and then crimping might leave a bulge at the front of the round.  I think you are discovering why cartridges like this went obsolete.  I found a steady rest - not sure I want to pay what they are asking. 

    Have you checked the spent case for roundness before sizing?
    Spin a fired case on something flat and watch the neck.
  • forgemonkeyforgemonkey Member Posts: 20,101 ✭✭✭
    edited March 2
    Charlie,,,,,can’t answer the new cases being undersized, I didn’t measure them. And they chambered out of the box. If undersized why would a .257” bullet start in a new case. And the same bullet not start in a resized case, without belling. 
     I will shoot the loaded rounds in a day or so and start again. 
  • TRAP55TRAP55 Member Posts: 7,876 ✭✭✭
    Just so I'm clear, the 1st five with Unique had gas checks, and this 5 with TrailBoss have them too?
    Are you using lighter bullets with this 5?
    Are the bullets made for gas checks?
    BTW, you don't need gas checks with TrailBoss.
  • forgemonkeyforgemonkey Member Posts: 20,101 ✭✭✭
    edited March 3
    Trap,,,,,the first 5 had no gas checks. And the loaded ones (20) do have GC. The initial 5 bullets weighed 91gr. and the GC ones weigh 82gr. Both were sold as 85gr. Two different manufacturers.
    I didn’t order GC bullets but the manufacturer shipped with GC. And yes, the bullets are made for GC, and both measure .257”.


  • TRAP55TRAP55 Member Posts: 7,876 ✭✭✭
    Sorry for all the questions, just trying to figure out the problem.
    Were the gas checks already installed?
    If not, did you stick em on, and size?
    Asking because a good 10yrs ago, I discovered some are flared( Hornaday?) and have to be crimped on. New cuss words were invented with that learning moment. In my years of reloading, I never ran across the crimp type before, and to make the day more interesting, they were in a ziploc bag with a bunch that weren't. "Free" always has a catch. :)
  • forgemonkeyforgemonkey Member Posts: 20,101 ✭✭✭
    TRAP55 said:c
    Sorry for all the questions, just trying to figure out the problem.
    Were the gas checks already installed?
    If not, did you stick em on, and size?
    Asking because a good 10yrs ago, I discovered some are flared( Hornaday?) and have to be crimped on. New cuss words were invented with that learning moment. In my years of reloading, I never ran across the crimp type before, and to make the day more interesting, they were in a ziploc bag with a bunch that weren't. "Free" always has a catch. :)
    Yeah, Trap, the GC were installed and I verified the diameter. No worries re the ???,,,,,,,
  • Grunt2Grunt2 Member Posts: 1,396 ✭✭✭
    I have found that crimping with the sizer die (appx. 1/16") produces more accurate results in most loads...Have you checked the loaded rounds with a headspace gauge? (if you can find one for your 25-25!!)... I had problems with cast bullets in the 44-40 and 38-55...It was all about the brass thickness...With the 44-40 I never got one brand of brass to chamber due to case thickness...But with other brands,,,no problem!...When I started using 375Win brass for my 38-55 (cheaper and more sturdy) I had the same problem until I crimped with the sizer die...
    Just my 2C...
    Retired LEO
    Combat Vet VN
  • forgemonkeyforgemonkey Member Posts: 20,101 ✭✭✭
    Grunt2 said:
    I have found that crimping with the sizer die (appx. 1/16") produces more accurate results in most loads...Have you checked the loaded rounds with a headspace gauge? (if you can find one for your 25-25!!)... I had problems with cast bullets in the 44-40 and 38-55...It was all about the brass thickness...With the 44-40 I never got one brand of brass to chamber due to case thickness...But with other brands,,,no problem!...When I started using 375Win brass for my 38-55 (cheaper and more sturdy) I had the same problem until I crimped with the sizer die...
    Just my 2C...
    Grunt2, I will have to wait till I shoot the loaded rounds and then verify various measurements.
  • OkieOkie Member Posts: 177
    edited March 4
    I think the "new" cases were/are undersized a little.  Belling the case and then crimping might leave a bulge at the front of the round.  I think you are discovering why cartridges like this went obsolete.  I found a steady rest - not sure I want to pay what they are asking. 

    Have you checked the spent case for roundness before sizing?
    Spin a fired case on something flat and watch the neck.


    Agree:
    Also when belling and crimping the case's must not be even little bit too long or a small bulge will occur behind the crimp.
    When belling and crimping cases I first check the case length, Then reload one or two and then after loading immediately  check for proper chambering, then load about 10 and check all again. I've seen it happen (hard chambering or no chambering) on just a few cases that were ????? I had to do like you sometimes, remove the de-capping pin and carefully re-size re-size and get a go.
    I did find that for a good accurate reduced load, reduced velocity load in the smaller calibers, for example a 223 required a precise  bullet crimp. (pressures would vary and accuracy become non consistent when not crimped) I was testing for a reduced velocity accurate load in the vicinity of a 22 magnum velocity so as to use a 223 for squirrel hunting. Found such a load and a scope that I could easily adjust for on target from LV to HV easily and quickly. The same LV load recipe worked well in most all 223's rifles that I tested.

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