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Reloading Shiloh Sharps

lao gailao gai Member Posts: 3
My brother-in-law got a new Shiloh Sharps reproduction in 45-70. He asked me to load for it because I've reloaded for 40 years, BUT only for modern rifles. I'm not confident and don't want to mess up his lovely new treasure. I have a 45-70 die set, brass, etc. But are there special considerations for thee, like only cast lead bullets? Any advice appreciated.

GarCH

Comments

  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,348 ✭✭✭
    I think the weapon is strong enough to stand any 45-70 data you can find. 86 Winchester data would be a good place to start and work up to his recoil tolerance.  I have a Mexican Small Ring Mauser in 45-70 that was Stu Brainer's aka Mr. 45-70. He built several 45-70 revolvers and dozens of Colt Walker repo's.
    I like the 330 Gould Hollow Point.
  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,453 ✭✭✭
    There is a lot of loading data available, using lead bullets and modern powders like trail boss. Not likely you could work up a load that would be dangerous, from a reloading manual using these components.

    Advise you BIL to be careful of modern smokeless loads. Not so much regarding the safety aspect. As the Shiloh sharps, is a high quality U.S. made reproduction. It's that they are very unpleasant to shoot. Smokeless loads with heavy jacketed bullets, are guaranteed to give him a bad case of flinchitis.
  • nononsensenononsense Member, Moderator Posts: 10,575 ******
    rufe-snow said:
    There is a lot of loading data available, using lead bullets and modern powders like trail boss. Not likely you could work up a load that would be dangerous, from a reloading manual using these components.

    Advise you BIL to be careful of modern smokeless loads. Not so much regarding the safety aspect. As the Shiloh sharps, is a high quality U.S. made reproduction. It's that they are very unpleasant to shoot. Smokeless loads with heavy jacketed bullets, are guaranteed to give him a bad case of flinchitis.
    Unfortunately, in this day and age, much of the information we can glean from the internet is now diametrically opposed or sharply divided by adverse opinions not necessarily backed by facts. So we have to be careful about who we listen to and whether it's valid or simply an opinion.
    According to Shiloh Sharps, these reproductions are made to modern standards of pressure. Therefore we should be able to use modern loads with the same standards of safety applied.  But this does not preclude using lower pressure loads or even black powder loads if desired.
    I added the bold to rufe-snow's suggestion because it bears repeating for practical importance. Heavier bullets fired at modern pressures and velocities can result in substantially heavier recoil. This will usually shorten range sessions faster than running out of ammunition. If you want shoot a lot, choose lighter bullets and milder charges. Save those gargantuan bullets and magnum loads for the Cape Buffalo you want to harvest. ;)
    Best.


  • Hawk CarseHawk Carse Member Posts: 4,296 ✭✭✭
    Agree with rufe.  Which is why I have a .40-65 instead of a .45-70.  
    The lazy way out would be to buy some 400 gr Speer soft points and load them up with however much 3031 or other medium powder you think he can stand.  Lots of proven data out there.  Elmer Keith could stand a lot, but BIL doesn't have to.  Lighter bullets seldom satisfy except at shorter ranges, heavier bullets kick more.   The Shiloh Shooters I know load 500 gr bullets and black powder, but that is a whole 'nother hobby. 
  • SoreShoulderSoreShoulder Member Posts: 2,605 ✭✭✭
    While Shiloh Sharps may be a great company, the go-to advice in such a case should be to ask the manufacturer stamped on the barrel.  
    There's a small but definite chance the maker has been misidentified.  


  • lao gailao gai Member Posts: 3
    Thanks to all!
  • lao gailao gai Member Posts: 3
    He ordered it direct from Shiloh Sharps btw
  • nononsensenononsense Member, Moderator Posts: 10,575 ******
    While Shiloh Sharps may be a great company, the go-to advice in such a case should be to ask the manufacturer stamped on the barrel.  
    There's a small but definite chance the maker has been misidentified.  


    lao * said:
    He ordered it direct from Shiloh Sharps btw
    And that's why I spoke with Shiloh Sharps... :)
    Best.

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