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Nagant M1985 Revolver

victorj19victorj19 Member Posts: 3,573 ✭✭✭

A neighbor unexpectedly gave me the gun and 28 rounds today for doing some chain saw work a couple weeks ago after a storm.  It is marked "1944".  I had seen a few at shows and an acquaintance had one at a range years ago.  It looks unissued and has an importer's info etched on it.   Interesting cartridge with the brass going into the throat to make a gas seal.  Looking forward to shooting it.  It looks very utilitarian and a strong design.


Is 1944 the year of manufacture?  Was it made at the Ishevsk Arsenal?  There' a sale on the auction side that says it was made at Ishevsk.  Or, did other arsenals also make them in 1944?  What was the purpose of the gas sealing cartridge?  Were there other cartridges like it?  Is the Russian ammo corrosively primed?

Comments

  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,452 ✭✭✭
    Had a number of them years ago. Including a .22 and a supposedly NKVD model. Along with one whose chambers had been reamed, for the 7.62 X 25 Toke cartridge. At that time they were dirt cheap, because nobody wanted them. They were considered useless clunkers by most of the collectors, circa 70's/80's. 
    The internal cam that forced the chamber forward, really had a negative effect on the trigger pull. 
    They since have acquired quite a collectors following, and I wish I had keep the above 3. Along with a lot of other stuff, I let get away over the years. 
  • KenK/84BravoKenK/84Bravo Member Posts: 7,372 ✭✭✭✭

    One of the few revolvers that will work with a Suppressor.

    A robust utilitarian design.

    Nice gift.

    Extreme NE TN/W NC ya'll. 😁

  • rufe-snowrufe-snow Member Posts: 18,452 ✭✭✭
    victorj19 said:

    A neighbor unexpectedly gave me the gun and 28 rounds today for doing some chain saw work a couple weeks ago after a storm.  It is marked "1944".  I had seen a few at shows and an acquaintance had one at a range years ago.  It looks unissued and has an importer's info etched on it.   Interesting cartridge with the brass going into the throat to make a gas seal.  Looking forward to shooting it.  It looks very utilitarian and a strong design.


    Is 1944 the year of manufacture?  Was it made at the Ishevsk Arsenal?  There' a sale on the auction side that says it was made at Ishevsk.  Or, did other arsenals also make them in 1944?  What was the purpose of the gas sealing cartridge?  Were there other cartridges like it?  Is the Russian ammo corrosively primed?

    Was able to research, your specific questions, regarding the Model 1895, "Gas Seal" revolver. It was made in Tula Arsenal in 1944. It has been refinished, prior to it's recent importation and sale to the U.S. 

    Although it was a Belgian design. The Russians were the only country, who adopted the "Gas Seal", moving cylinder version. As a military firearm. Some few, were sold commercially. Also the Radom factory in Poland. Made a small number, for the Polish police or military? After the First World War. I had one of these many years ago. They are much rarer and more valuable, than the Russian Nagants.
  • Henry0ReillyHenry0Reilly Member Posts: 10,675 ✭✭✭

    When in doubt, clean as if military ammo is corrosive.

    I used to recruit for the NRA until they sold us down the river (again!) in Heller v. DC. See my auctions (if any) under username henryreilly
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