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New Rock-ola M1 Carbine Receivers?

Fairlane66Fairlane66 Member Posts: 323 ✭✭
Perhaps I've been hiding under my COVID-19 rock, but I just saw a current GB auction for an M1 carbine "assembled using one of the new ROCK-OLA receivers."  Pictures show a oddly stamped Rock-ola receiver bearing serial number 243.  I have several M1 carbines, including an early WWII Rock-ola, so I know what an original Rock-ola stamping should look like....and the one in the auction is off.  I guess someone is producing new Rock-olas.  I tried to Google info, but came up empty-handed.  Can anyone shed light on these "new Rock-olas?"

Comments

  • mark christianmark christian Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 22,877 ******
    edited July 9
    James River Armory produces new M1 Carbines as complete rifles and as receivers which are branded as Rock-ola. Rock-ola, the jukebox box company, was purchased by a British firm a few years ago, so it seems likely that James River Armory obtained the rights to the Rock-ola name by  paying a license fee. 
  • Fairlane66Fairlane66 Member Posts: 323 ✭✭
    Ahhhhh, makes sense now.  Thanks for the info.  However, I'm still not sure why a modern-day Rock-ola receiver would be in demand.  James River Armory certainly isn't fooling anyone into believing their buying a WWII Rock-ola.  However, to each his own, I suppose.
  • mark christianmark christian Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 22,877 ******
    I doubt that JRA is trying to fool anyone. Newly manufacturer carbines marked as Inland have been on the market for the last few years:  https://www.inland-mfg.com/Inland-Carbines/M1-1945.html

  • nononsensenononsense Member, Moderator Posts: 10,587 ******
    Ahhhhh, makes sense now.  Thanks for the info.  However, I'm still not sure why a modern-day Rock-ola receiver would be in demand.  James River Armory certainly isn't fooling anyone into believing their buying a WWII Rock-ola.  However, to each his own, I suppose.

    I doubt that JRA is trying to fool anyone. Newly manufacturer carbines marked as Inland have been on the market for the last few years:  https://www.inland-mfg.com/Inland-Carbines/M1-1945.html

    It's not the idea of fooling anyone as there is really no need.
    The demand for military style commemoratives as well as field versions is extremely high. JRA manufacturing an M1 receiver and complete carbines is filling that demand. Springfield Armory does the same with their multiple models of the historic M1A rifle line.  Nostalgia plays a part in the demand but the function and style of each rifle and the fact that there are competitions set up for these arms specifically drives the demand.
    Years ago I was working with a friend who brought me a Luger PO8 to evaluate. It was serialized as original, late war, complete and in excellent condition. He was not a collector or investor so I asked why he would buy such a firearm? Answer: It looks mean and aggressive! He loved the look of aggressiveness in the design.
    The same applies to some of the demand for the above rifles. Military style supported by the aggressive look of the rifles with some nostalgia thrown in fuels demand.
    Best.

  • nmyersnmyers Member Posts: 16,331 ✭✭✭
    I suspect that they asked Winchester to license their name first, but were turned down.  That's just a guess.
    Neal
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