.

Asking for a friend

victorj19victorj19 Member Posts: 3,549 ✭✭✭
What is the hole diameter for a 22 cal suppessor?

Comments

  • mark christianmark christian Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 22,462 ******
    There is no hard fast rule; every company bores their baffles and exit hole to a different diameter. I checked a couple of my rimfire cans and found the exit holes at 6.5mm, which is around .256
  • pip5255pip5255 Member Posts: 1,550 ✭✭✭
    See the source image
    just because you could doesn't mean you should
  • BobJudyBobJudy Member Posts: 1,804 ✭✭✭
    There is no hard fast rule; every company bores their baffles and exit hole to a different diameter. I checked a couple of my rimfire cans and found the exit holes at 6.5mm, which is around .256
    Mark - how much suppression do you get using an over bored can? For instance a 9mm can on a 22. Bob
  • mark christianmark christian Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 22,462 ******
    edited July 23
    I've never fired a .22 rimfire through a 9mm suppressor, or even through a .22 centerfire can. .22LR leaves so much dirt and gunk that cleanup wouldn't be worth it (it is bad enough in a dedicated rimfire can). I have fired .223 though a .30 caliber can many times and the difference in the opening for the bullet isn't as much of a factor as one might think. One reason is that a .30 cal can is considerably larger, which means it has more internal volume, which naturally aids in reducing noise.

    Of course there is no free lunch. Size and weight becomes an important factor.
    Here are 2 Yankee Hill suppressors:

    The top can is .30 and the bottom is .223/5.56. 
    The .30 can is roughly 3 inches longer and weighs 6 ounces more, which doesn't sound like much, until you try balancing in it on the end of (say) an M4 carbine. 


  • BobJudyBobJudy Member Posts: 1,804 ✭✭✭
    I've never fired a .22 rimfire through a 9mm suppressor, or even through a .22 centerfire can. .22LR leaves so much dirt and gunk that cleanup wouldn't be worth it (it is bad enough in a dedicated rimfire can). I have fired .223 though a .30 caliber can many times and the difference in the opening for the bullet isn't as much of a factor as one might think. One reason is that a .30 cal can is considerably larger, which means it has more internal volume, which naturally aids in reducing noise.

    Of course there is no free lunch. Size and weight becomes an important factor.
    Here are 2 Yankee Hill suppressors:

    The top can is .30 and the bottom is .223/5.56. 
    The .30 can is roughly 3 inches longer and weighs 6 ounces more, which doesn't sound like much, until you try balancing in it on the end of (say) an M4 carbine. 


    Thanks, I knew I'd get an educated answer. Your observations confirmed what I initially thought. Then me being me, I had to try and over think it. I wondered if the over bore would let gas blow by and negate the effects of the cans expansion chambers. So when I saw this post I figured why not ask someone who has had a lot of experience. Bob
Sign In or Register to comment.