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What kind of fish is this?

knucklehead14knucklehead14 Member Posts: 2,278 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited November 2007 in The Fishing Hole!
What kind of fish is this?

Thanks for your help.whiteperch.jpg

Comments

  • MN HunterMN Hunter Member Posts: 2,299
    edited November -1
    a small one [;)]

    i dunno, never seen one like that. where you catch it...south, north, east, west, fresh water, salt water?
  • knucklehead14knucklehead14 Member Posts: 2,278 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Caught at lake Erie, Ohio.
  • mrbrucemrbruce Member Posts: 3,374
    edited November -1
    I have never been fishing in Lake Erie Ohio !!!
    I caught that White Perch in Chautauqua Lake in New York, and I posted that photo a while ago. At least thats my hand holding it.....
    Here it is again right from the Tiny Pic folder I put it in.
    rmsarc.jpg
  • elkoholicelkoholic Member Posts: 5,130
    edited November -1
    white bass or a small whiper (white bass/ striper hybred, just a guess, don't see any of that around here.
  • knucklehead14knucklehead14 Member Posts: 2,278 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I had that pic in my files too, I thought it was one that we had caught. It is the exact same that we were catching at Lake Erie. I was wondering what it was. That is about the same size we were catching also. I must have downloaded your pic for some reason at one time or another but it is exactly what we were catching and I was wondering what it is? We were catching them as fast as you could get your line back in the water.
    As soon as I find my pics from the lake, I will post ours.
  • Huntingnerd33Huntingnerd33 Member Posts: 1,636 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    It'd have to be a white perch. The body looks a lot like a white bass or wiper, but there are no black bands on the fish's sides. That was my first thought too that it was a white bass. Check out this link for a picture of a white perch. http://www.ngpc.state.ne.us/fishing/guides/identification/search.asp
  • knucklehead14knucklehead14 Member Posts: 2,278 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The stripe going along it`s body isn`t showing on the white perch
    picture on that website.
  • Huntingnerd33Huntingnerd33 Member Posts: 1,636 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by knucklehead14
    The stripe going along it`s body isn`t showing on the white perch
    picture on that website.


    Good point, but that's just its lateral line, in some fish it really stands out, others it's very faint. I've caught white bass that have a distinct lateral line and the next one doesn't look like it had one at all. I still think it's a white perch, but I could be wrong. [;)]
  • mrbrucemrbruce Member Posts: 3,374
    edited November -1
    There really is no doubt that it's a White Perch, and they sure do put up a fight for there size.
    This one is about average, but we do catch them a lot bigger sometimes.
  • Dak To 68Dak To 68 Member Posts: 1,404 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I'm coming in late here, but this fish is NOT a perch or of the perch family (perch, walleye, sauger), it is a true bass (white bass, striped bass, "whiper" hybred, and yellow bass) properly called a yellow bass. The yellow bass is very similar to the white bass except that it doesn't get near as big as the white, a really large one would go maybe 2lbs., the average being 1/2-1lb. Also they have a SLIGHT yellowish tint in areas. They are fairly common around here and can be a bit of a nuisance at times.
  • mrbrucemrbruce Member Posts: 3,374
    edited November -1
    It's darn funny that all the State fish and game depts still call them WHITE PERCH....
    White Bass are a different kind of critter than these are......
    They may be related to the striped bass but thats about it.
    Do a Google search and see for yourself instead of assuming you know what your talking about....
  • Dak To 68Dak To 68 Member Posts: 1,404 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by mrbruce
    It's darn funny that all the State fish and game depts still call them WHITE PERCH....
    White Bass are a different kind of critter than these are......
    They may be related to the striped bass but thats about it.
    Do a Google search and see for yourself instead of assuming you know what your talking about....


    I'm not assuming I know what I'm talking about, I know what I'm talking about. I don't care what Fish and Game depts. call them, the fish in the picture is not of the perch family. I've caught lots of these fish. A good reference on this is Fleigers "Fishes of Missouri".
    The fish in the posted picture is a true bass, scientific name is "morone mississippiensis", common name is yellow bass. It is closely related to "morone crysops, the white bass, and to "morone saxafilis", the striped bass. I'll give you this, if it's not a "morone mississippiensis" it's a "morone americana", which is, no matter what it's called locally, a bass, not a perch.
    Many fishes are called many different names in different areas, for instance walleyes are commonly known as jack salmon here in Missouri, and are in no way a salmonid, or related to the salmonids, they are of the perch family. The fishes called largemouth, smallmouth, Kentucky basses aren't basses at all, but rather are members of the sunfish family, big sunfish, but sunfish they are. Different strokes for different folks.
  • mrbrucemrbruce Member Posts: 3,374
    edited November -1
    You really should study up more....
    The posted photo shows no signs of any Yellow at all on it and the Yellow Bass has that color. Even though the White Perch is in the true bass family it is still according to all reports a White Perch, and is different that a Yellow Bass no matter where your at....
  • REX6666REX6666 Member Posts: 188 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    WHAT DID IT TASTE LIKE BASS OR PERCH
  • Dak To 68Dak To 68 Member Posts: 1,404 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by REX6666
    WHAT DID IT TASTE LIKE BASS OR PERCH


    [:D]
  • fishkiller41fishkiller41 Member Posts: 50,608
    edited November -1
    I dunno what the hekk it is, but it looks tasty to me ..[:p]

    Jeff
  • blugillblugill Member Posts: 525 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Looks like a shad.
  • Sparty_76Sparty_76 Member Posts: 854 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
  • mrbrucemrbruce Member Posts: 3,374
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by tfitz54
    White Bass.
    Wrong answer cant you read ?
  • jonkjonk Member Posts: 10,121
    edited November -1
    It is definitely a white perch- though it is NOT a member of the perch family, this is true- but then again, neither is the walleye a member of the pickerel family, and they are often referred to as pickerel.

    Anyhow, they aren't so great to eat. A bit strong, not nearly as good as yellow perch, but better than sheepshead- I tried cleaning one once for practice and the cat wouldn't even eat it!
  • 6rounds6rounds Member Posts: 12 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    IMHO that certainly looks like a white pearch,
    Seldom reaching more than 12 inches in length, white perch are the smallest members of New York State's true bass. They are easily told apart from other true bass because white perch have no dark stripes and no patches of teeth on their tongues.

    Like striped bass, white perch can live in both fresh and salWar on Terrorer. Although white perch prefer brackish waters, they also live in rivers, lakes and reservoirs. They often occur in large schools in turbid shallow areas. They are rapidly expanding their range in the state and can be found in the Hudson River and its tributaries south of Troy, small lakes east of the Hudson, fresh and brackish waters of Long Island, the Seneca River and Mohawk River systems, Oneida and Chautauqua Lakes, and in Lake Erie, Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River.

    White perch are prolific breeders. Schools of spawning white perch crowd into tributary streams or along gravelly shoal areas in lakes and large rivers to deposit their eggs. The tiny eggs sink to the bottom and attach to vegetation and rocks. Young perch eat plankton and insects while older perch feed mostly on fish.

    White perch are tasty fish with white, flaky flesh. At one time, they were an important commercial species in New York. Today, their large numbers and catchability make them popular panfish. Although small in size, they can put up a good fight when hooked. White perch are especially easy to catch in the spring during spawning. They can be caught by still fishing with worms or grubs, or by casting small flies or lures. Best catches are taken at dusk or after dark.
  • millerlitemillerlite Member Posts: 16 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by mrbruce
    I have never been fishing in Lake Erie Ohio !!!
    I caught that White Perch in Chautauqua Lake in New York, and I posted that photo a while ago. At least thats my hand holding it.....
    Here it is again right from the Tiny Pic folder I put it in.
    rmsarc.jpg


    Big fish trick...closer to the camera, bigger the fish looks..[:D] And this white perch is a cousin to the stipped bass. I do think someone said that though. lol


    millerlite
  • millerlitemillerlite Member Posts: 16 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by jonk
    It is definitely a white perch- though it is NOT a member of the perch family, this is true- but then again, neither is the walleye a member of the pickerel family, and they are often referred to as pickerel.

    Anyhow, they aren't so great to eat. A bit strong, not nearly as good as white perch, but better than sheepshead- I tried cleaning one once for practice and the cat wouldn't even eat it!


    FYI: Walleyes are in the perch family. True blue walleye fisherperson here!!

    millerlite
  • John ClydeJohn Clyde Member Posts: 22 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    The fish pictured is commonly called a white pearch. They are originally a salt water species, and when very small fry look just like stripped bass, which is also a salt water species. I live in south-central Kansas, and Cheney Reservoir just west of Wichita is full of them. They were introduced by mistake when fishery biologists were re-stocking stripped bass. They are considered a pest here in Kansas, and Dept of Wildlife and Parks suggests killing every one we catch, and not to use them for bait in any other bodies of water. The good thing is, big walleye and flathead cat fish just love to eat them.
  • logger_bradlogger_brad Member Posts: 3 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    That is a Conney Island Whitefish.
    Here is a BASS.......Just kidding :) Don't look like any White bass I've ever seen


    Bradbass1.jpg
  • cwfcwf Member Posts: 25 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    White perch,have been catching them here in Mass. for 50 yrs.Great eating and fun to catch
  • mrbrucemrbruce Member Posts: 3,374
    edited November -1
    Great !
    Another fisherman that really knows what he's talking about instead of just taking a WAG.
  • sgtjohnharrissgtjohnharris Member Posts: 1 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    That sir, is BAIT!!
  • Turbo72Turbo72 Member Posts: 432 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Im from Nebraska and here they are known as White Perch. No idea why they are called this because they are not a perch at all and are definitely part of the bass family!
  • Liv2FishLiv2Fish Member Posts: 655 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    What ever it is I bet it was fun to catch. Here at the Lake Oarks fishing is starting to get good. I have been catch quite a few white bass on a one ounce jiging spoon in 15 to 25'of water. I have been catching around 50 a evening in about an hour and a half.
  • Hunter MagHunter Mag Member Posts: 6,605 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Should have posted a poll with this thread. [:D]
  • carolinashootercarolinashooter Member Posts: 335 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    It is a white perch. At least that is what they are called in N.C. It is not surprising someone up there does not know this. While shooting at Perry this year my wife and I drove to Sandusky for dinner. Waitress gave me a blank stare when I asked for sweet tea with my meal. She had no idea what I was talking about. I could not get back to N.C. fast enough.
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