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Best outjboard motor for a 13' Boston Whaler

gary wraygary wray Member Posts: 4,663
edited April 2010 in The Fishing Hole!
I have just repurchased my old 1965 Whaler that I sold in 1984. Found it last fall at a boat auction and had to buy it back! It has a 1989 25 Johnson on it that runs OK but am thinking about going up a bit. I will use it for mainly freshwater lake fishing with the grandkids so real speed is not the big issue. Would like to hear some recommendations from some Fishing Hole friends. Thanks!

Comments

  • MMOMEQ-55MMOMEQ-55 Member Posts: 13,134
    edited November -1
    A 4 stroke in 35 would push a 13' about 28-30 knots. There are so many out there and so many opinions about them. If you can afford one the Hondas are hard to beat. Nissan is probably the cheapest priced motors and are still a good motor. One of the best motor I have ever owned is a 27hp diesel Tohatsu. Heavy, slow, but will run all day on 6 gallons of diesel. I have it on a wooden flat bottom skif and it has been a great motor.

    I like Evinrudes and have always had great service out of them.


    Wasn't it a 13' that Boston Whaler they used in a commercial where they cut it in half with a chainsaw and it still floated. They also did a commercial where one of the 13' boats was used to go up a small waterfall. They used to have some wild commercials until they built their rep. I guess now they don't have to advertise.

    A 27' Whaler is my dream boat but it will have to wait until I win the lottery. LOL
  • wpagewpage Member Posts: 10,203 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    You could go up some. Don t get a 4 stroke they are too heavy and will push up front trim and slow it down. Heavy 4 strokes on small craft also take away from your load capacity.
    Unless you plan to take the kids water skiing. 25 2 stroke is really all you need. You could probably go up to 35 but be certain to check your weight tables with Boston Whaler to be certain.
  • fishkiller41fishkiller41 Member Posts: 50,608
    edited November -1
    +1.
    Depends what u wanna do with it.
    If you're pullin crab pots a 9.9 JohnRude is plenty.A 25 would be better.
    $/stroke,,,not so good on a small hull. Anything under 17-19' really needs a 2/stroke...
  • MMOMEQ-55MMOMEQ-55 Member Posts: 13,134
    edited November -1
    The 4 strokes are heavier but I will not buy anything else ever since the first one I bought. No oil mixing, no smoke, quieter, more dependable. And they burn less gas too.

    I wish I could get a Tohatsu diesel in a larger HP. That little motor is great. Love it. I use it down on the coast to get back in the cribbins. There is Black Drum back there up to 100 lbs. Always trout and during the summer there is Spanish running around. I even caught a 14# Tarpon back there on a 5 wt fly rod with 6# tippet using a silver Clouser. Now that was pure fun. You can always limit out on Red Drum there.
  • gary wraygary wray Member Posts: 4,663
    edited November -1
    Thanks guys for all the feedback. It is getting warmer now and my search for an engine for my Whaler is going to go into warp speed. Taking your suggestions, it sounds as if something in the 2 cycle 30/35 hp range would be best. Hate to mix oil and gas again but see what you mean about the weight of a four cycle. And, yes, an old Whaler like mine was cut in half in a famous ad and both side floated. The darn thing is just about unbreakable. Mine is a 1965 and with a little TLC will get back to looking like she did in 1972! Not too often you get to buy your old boat back! Going to teach my grandkids to run the same boat I taught their Mom's to run in the late 70's and early 80's. Now I need to find a good teak or mahogany interior. Any suggest there? Thanks again for the feedback! Gary
  • fishkiller41fishkiller41 Member Posts: 50,608
    edited November -1
    If it's not rotted,save it..It was prob. varnished from the factory,so, getting that mess off is the firs order of binnis. Then look into a product called "SNAPPY TEAK NEW".
    Directions come with the kit.It is a cleaner,brightener in one bottle, even comes with a scrub brush.Follow the grain..Rinse well and let dry "BONE DRY".Follow with 3-4 coats of the #2 solution of Teak oil.
    Once every 2 years or so will keep it like new.Specially if u cover it up for winter.
    I would not go back to varnish/shellac.
  • gary wraygary wray Member Posts: 4,663
    edited November -1
    fishkiller41....thanks for the suggestion. I gave my 13' Whaler interior to my son in law for his 15' Whaler and I am passing your info on to him. I think I am going to buy one of the interiors being sold on Ebay for @$500. Do you have any other suggestions on wood? Going to get a duckcover for the boat to protect the interior but have to wait until I get a new motor (still haven't got one yet!) so the cover can be made to fit. Got an local guy who made my original one back in the early 80's and did a great job so going to repeat. That will protect the wood from the sun and weather and keep it original. Thanks again.
  • wpagewpage Member Posts: 10,203 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Gary,
    Good luck with your move on the out board. There are lots of them out there. The old johnson evinrudes are the best in my opinion. If you dont find one on flea bay. There are plenty in the fishing rags that come out and even on craigs list.
    Good Luck!
  • gary wraygary wray Member Posts: 4,663
    edited November -1
    wpage........thanks for the Evi suggestion. I agree with you as when I had the 13' Whaler originally it had a pull start Evi 25 on it and I got tired of that and replaced it with a leftover new 79 Evi. It was a great motor and was on it when I sold it in 1984. Somehow over the years that got replaced by the 1989 Evi that was on it when I bought it. I gave that motor to my son-in for his Whaler so now I am on the quest to replace it with a new Evi. Loved the 25 as with my little girls it got the Whaler on plane quick but I'm thinking now that I might go up to a 30 or so to pull the grandkids waterskiing when they get tired of fishing and such. But I had that motor for almost seven years and didn't do a thing with it but keep gas and oil in it. Thanks again for the feedback. Will let you know what I find.
  • fishkiller41fishkiller41 Member Posts: 50,608
    edited November -1
    As a rule, wood & water don't mix well, unless u constantly maintain it.I'm not exactly what u mean by "suggestions on wood" but, i don't know of any wood that stands the test of time like Teak.Maybe Cedar but, i doubt it will come close.Ironwood was used for years in sailing ships as keel material, for it's weight,as much as it's durability.As far as finishes go, that Snappy teak new is the stuff.
    What are these new interiors on ebay,for Whalers made from, Teak or "Starboard"?Starboard is like corian, it will never rot but, i think it only comes in white.For looks, a Whaler kinda needs to have Teak but don't HAVE TO.Starboard would be the last time it ever needed replaced.
  • gary wraygary wray Member Posts: 4,663
    edited November -1
    fishkiller41....thanks for the feedback. I have seen teak, mahogany, and the stuff that looks white so must be the "starboard" stuff you mention. It looks rather ugly. I like the teak most of all but it is expensive. Cedar rots so that's out. Still haven't done anything yet so the Whaler has not interior and no motor still. Trying to make up my mind!! But it makes me feel darn good to know that she is sitting the driveway patiently waiting on me to come around to a decision or two! Thanks for the feedback!!
  • MMOMEQ-55MMOMEQ-55 Member Posts: 13,134
    edited November -1
    Having restored several Whalers, I use teak for the bright work and then seal it with epoxy. Over the epoxy I apply 3 coats of spar varnish. Depending on the exposure this last for several years. Even after the bright work has weathered all it takes to restore to new like condition is a slight sanding with 220 grit then another coat of varnish.

    The key is the epoxy. Onced sealed in epoxy the wood will not rot or weather. The varnish weathers but like I said a quick sanding with 220 and another coat of varnish and you will look new again.

    If you keep your boat under cover the bright work will look new for many years.
  • gary wraygary wray Member Posts: 4,663
    edited November -1
    MMMOMEQ-55....I am with you on the teak. Just can't beat the look. I have a guy making me a duck cover for the Whaler like the one I had back in the 70's that covered both the boat and the motor. Just got tired of it sitting at the dock and filling up with rainwater. Once that is done I should be good to go. Thanks for your tips.
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