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Should I resize new jacketed bullets?

I get mixed results from searching the web.

Comments

  • dcs shootersdcs shooters Member Posts: 10,969
    edited November -1
    I've never seen the need to with all of them I've loaded. That's quite a few thousand between rifle and pistol.
  • XXCrossXXCross Member Posts: 1,316 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If you expect to retain anything useable, you can only bump them up..not squeeze them down.
  • gunnut505gunnut505 Member Posts: 10,290
    edited November -1
    If the diameter differs quite a bit from your bore, pressure spikes may result; get a sample of them and set the calipers to 'em.
    Unlike most cast bullets, jacketed ones are usually very close to the same size as the most-often-encountered bore diameter for the specific caliber you're loading.
    Fer instance: your Blackhawk's bore diameter works out to be 0.355", but your SAA Colt's is 0.358", and they both shoot .357magnum.
    You ordered a bunch of .357 SJHPs which average 0.360" diameter, and long to shoot them in something.
    It may be safer to shoot them in your SAA Colt than your Blackhawk; but since the Ruger is built like a tank, I wouldn't hesitate to shoot "average velocity" handloads in either gun.
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,348 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    In general I agree with XXCross.

    Had a friend that sized and lubed cast bullets, then ran them in a CH swedger. The machine rest said they shot better but I couldn't tell.

    Know people that 1 shoot 45 ACP in an 06 with no issues and 2 a guy that shot 1000's of rounds of 9mm Sten gun ammo in a 30 Mauser broomhandle. Pressure required to swage bullets is small compaired to chamber pressures P.O. Ackley
  • bpostbpost Member Posts: 31,137 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Let me get this straight.
    You are asking about taking a XXX diameter JACKETED rifle/pistol bullet and swaging it down to a smaller diameter????
    if so.........
    No, it can't be done. Lead is a DEAD metal, it does not rebound like the jacket does when formed. Even a little change in diameter will break the bond between jacket and core making the result less than satisfactory.
  • v35v35 Member Posts: 13,200
    edited November -1
    I've sized .311, 32/20 JSP bullets down to .308 to shoot in the 7.65 Luger and found no difference between sized and unsized bullets. I don't believe a .0015" shaving on the surface disturbed any bond between lead and copper.
    Recoil,accuracy, penetration, case measurements and primer condition showed no differences so I abandoned resizing and used the .311 bullets.
    At that time I hadn't a chronograph to check velocity differences.
  • SoreShoulderSoreShoulder Member Posts: 2,666 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by bpostNo, it can't be done. Lead is a DEAD metal, it does not rebound like the jacket does when formed. Even a little change in diameter will break the bond between jacket and core making the result less than satisfactory.
    The core gets longer as it's swaged down in diameter, stretching the jacket. Then, the jacket's length can snap back and center the core. Unless it's sized more than the groove depth, the grooves will impress the loose jacket into the core and also help center it. This is true as long as the sizing is gentle enough that the lead doesn't start extruding through the hole in the jacket.

    I think accuracy went up when they started bumping bullets up instead of sizing but it wasn't hopeless before that; it might work especially if you only size a little and your bullet is not introduced into the throat too roughly.

    OTOH, you might wind up making the jacket more brittle and likely to crack. Most jackets aren't bonded to the core, though...it will usually say if they are because it costs more to do.

    Why does the OP want to size jacketed bullets? It may be obvious to the OP, but you normally only do so if you have an unusual bore size.
  • CheechakoCheechako Member Posts: 563 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Lead core jacketed bullets have always been bumped up in the final forming and pointing die. That's how they are made. Cast or swadged lead bullets can be bumped up or down.

    I have swadged down jacketed bullets for handgun use. A 300 grain .458 bullet to use in a .452 revolver. You need a really skookum press and plenty of lube and it works like a charm. Sure, the jacket and core may not be as tight as was intended, and accuracy may suffer, but we're talking about big revolver bullets. An average shooter would not be able to tell the difference.

    Likewise, bumping a .311 down to .308 for use in an AK or something like that is no big deal. They'll still shoot into Minute Of Tincan.

    JMHO

    Ray
  • SoreShoulderSoreShoulder Member Posts: 2,666 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Cheechako
    Lead core jacketed bullets have always been bumped up in the final forming and pointing die. That's how they are made.It wasn't always that way.
  • CheechakoCheechako Member Posts: 563 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    So, how were they made??
  • jonkjonk Member Posts: 10,121
    edited November -1
    Should you? No reason to. Can you? Yes, with certain limitations.

    The notion that resizing a jacket bullet in a push through die will result in jacket springback and loose cores is one of those reloading ideas that merits a lot on paper- such as not putting any lube on the case shoulder- but has no real basis in reality. I've resized a lot of jacketed .338 bullets to .332 for my M-95 Steyr (nominally a .329" bore diameter, but mine is a bit fat) and while I have had the occasional flyer attributable to a loose core (I think( in practice 99% of them are just fine. Similarly I've resized .308 to .300 for my Carcano with no issue.

    If this bothers you, there are companies that make jacketed bullet reducing dies to avoid this issue.
  • bpostbpost Member Posts: 31,137 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Cheechako
    So, how were they made??


    The core is swaged into the jacket under big pressure. The jacket is already to diameter. The final steps is making a point on the bullet but that displaces the front part of the lead it does not change the jacket diameter.

    Corbin bullets has a kit to make 223 bullets from fired 22 cases. It works great. I made thousands of 223 bullets with it.
  • fire for effectfire for effect Member Posts: 121 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    According to Corbin you can swage a jacketed Bullet smaller, but no more than .002" to .003". This means that you can swage .357 jacketed bullets down to .355, or .311 jacketed bullets down to .308. Do not attempt to do more than this because the copper springs back, and the lead dos not, creating a loose core.
    I was doing this 30 years ago, because I could not find any decent bullets to shoot out of my .38 Super. I resized .357 bullets and it worked great. I made some wonderful loads out of .375 holow points.
  • 5mmgunguy5mmgunguy Member Posts: 3,853
    edited November -1
    Talk to Corbin about swaging jacketed bullets down. .005 to .006 is absolute max according to him...he prefers no more than .003 for the best results. He made me a swager that takes .204 bullets to .198 and it work very well...no real loss in accuracy.
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