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Hot loads on Once fired rifle brass

7.62x39Lover7.62x39Lover Member Posts: 3,933 ✭✭✭
Hi guys,

I am looking to reload for the first time pretty soon and I would like to know if it is OK to shoot relatively "hot" factory ammo and reload the brass with a similarly if not "hotter" load than the origional factory load.

To be exact, I would like to know if it is OK to shoot factory 75 gr. Prvi Partizan .223 and then reload that brass with 77 gr. Sierra Match King bullets over 24.1 gr. of N140.

Your thoughts and insight are much appreciated.

Comments

  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,346 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Some brass is better than other and will reload more times than crappy brass. How tight the chamber is to the resize die is a factor in case life. Higher pressure loads are harder on brass and don't always produce more velocity or the tightest group. If it's a new load to me I try and find two data sources to be sure.
  • nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,934 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    7.62x39Lover,

    Actually, asking for us to O.K. this load is not necessarily a good thing. All rifles and all chambers are different as are the barrels so the variables are too many to give a safe answer in this instance.

    But here is a link to the online VV reloading data which is in a .pdf:

    http://www.lapua.com/upload/downloads/brochures/2012/vihtavuorireloadingguideed10_2012eng.pdf

    Check it and maybe one other source just to be sure. Then start low and work up slowly watching for signs of pressure.

    Best.
  • MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 12,960 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I don't know where the hand load you quoted falls in the "hotness" scale(and I'm too tired this morning to look it up) but most reloaders prefer once fired brass for their "whoopazz" loads. Once fired brass has been "tested" and shown it doesn't have physical malformities but hasn't been stressed by multiple reloadings which might weaken it.
    The bullet weight has nothing to do with what you're asking BTW.
  • 7.62x39Lover7.62x39Lover Member Posts: 3,933 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Shooting out of an AR-15 chambered in 5.56.

    The load is probably not that hot in terms of powder charge. It would just be pushing a long, heavy bullet.
  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    I have asked my next question many times and never gotten a sensible answer. Other then dangerous game hunting what is the point of trying to wear out or blow up a Firearm like a mouse gun 223 . Just get a 50 BMG and be done with it. Sort of like getting a wimpy new car and starting it up in your yard and holding it to the floor to see how long it takes to blow it up. I grew up poor and I hate abusing machines.[?][?][?][?][?][?][?][?][?][?][?][?][?][?][?][?][?][?][?][?][?][?]
  • JustCJustC Member Posts: 16,055 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    you are increasing projectile weight by 2gr, that means nothing. Now, if you are trying to run a HOT powder charge, that means everything. Since you say it is below maximum (I have not checked) then I don't understand why you would worry. If someone told you that that is the be-all, end-all load,..well, prepeare to be disapointed. No 2 barrels/chambers are really the same.
  • sandwarriorsandwarrior Member Posts: 5,453 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    7.62x39Lover,

    I have loaded that very combination in some of my .223 bolt guns in the past and it worked well for accuracy and for the velocity I wanted to attain. I don't use it that much any more though as I've found less expensive ways to get what I need for that.

    You need to work up to this though in your gun as you may introduce a variable yourself that will make it a hot load.

    According to the link nononsense gave you, you fall into a relatively safe spot on the higher end of the spectrum. But, you still need to do a ladder and work up to it.

    You would safer still if you plan to load this in a 5.56 chamber. Again, work up to it.

    Added:

    I missed your second post explaining you want to load this in an AR with a 5.56 chamber.

    I also used that load in my 5.56 chambered AR. The powder will burn fast enough under the pressure of a heavier bullet that you won't get excessive pressure coming back to the bolt group. The problem with that powder in an AR is not enough pressure during initial ignition if not loaded hot enough. Meaning if you load light (even with heavy bullets) there won't be enough pressure to make that slow of a powder burn fast enough. You will get excessive gas pressure back through the gas system and a premature push on the bolt carrier. You can find that sweet spot with that load, but the range in which you operate is narrowed a bit.
    FWIW, I now use 25.3 gr. of RE-15 behind 75 and 77 gr. bullets in my AR's (5.56 chambers). The two powders are about comparable in speed, but RE-15 gives more pressure in the end. In any case, load up a ladder and work up to what is useable for you in VV N140 and see where it takes you. For a 5.56 chamber in an AR I recommend going up one full grain of powder from the start point you have in your book.
  • 7.62x39Lover7.62x39Lover Member Posts: 3,933 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks a lot for all the info guys. I will work up a load like sandwarrior suggested. I was unsure about how much "damage" the brass would take off of being fired once. I will inspect the brass, prep it, load it, and "work up" a load as suggested by y'all.
  • sandwarriorsandwarrior Member Posts: 5,453 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by 7.62x39Lover
    Thanks a lot for all the info guys. I will work up a load like sandwarrior suggested. I was unsure about how much "damage" the brass would take off of being fired once. I will inspect the brass, prep it, load it, and "work up" a load as suggested by y'all.


    The 'once fired' isn't really a big factor at all. Clean and prep your cases like always and you'll be fine. I've interchanged 5.56 NATO and .223 regularly over the years and haven't found that to matter as far as safety goes. Both cases will hold the higher pressure without problem. For accuracy, having a set of matched cases and a load that doesn't exhibit large fluctuations when getting warm (or colder) is the key.
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