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Reloading question

what can i do to make my loads more accurate? have been thinking about turning the necks,using a neck bushing die,micrometer seating die an not crimping the case. am i on the right track or just wasting money

Comments

  • oscar meyeroscar meyer Member Posts: 79 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I've thought about getting reloading equipment for my .357, but I'm unsure on what all I'm going to need. Does anyone have any advice for a newbie?
    GH1[:)]
  • oscar meyeroscar meyer Member Posts: 79 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    As many of you know I have recently started reloading. I have learned alot of different things by reading around on the internet and watching youtube videos. I have one question that i can not find an answer to, and i was wondering if you guys could help me. I have a Lee Colet Dye set for .270 WIN and when i'm done seating the bullet, i can easily push the bullet down inside the case (when i say "easy" i mean with like less than 2 lbs of force). Is this normal?!? I want to get a factory crimp dye, but i dont have any bullets with a cannelure.
    Can you only crimp bullets with a cannelure?? I'm thinking about getting the lee factory crimp dye. But i'm wondering if this will solve my problem.

    Thanks for any advice.
  • oscar meyeroscar meyer Member Posts: 79 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Helped Dad reload many years ago and got myself into it a few years ago with a mentor to bring me up to date. I load or will be loading 22 Hornet, 222, 223, 7mm TCU, 308, 30-06, and 7mm Mag.

    I have a Sierra 3rd and 10th, Hornady 7th, Speer 10th, and Lyman 46th.

    Are there any I don't have that I should get?
  • oscar meyeroscar meyer Member Posts: 79 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I am interested in reloading 9, 40, 45 pistol rounds and 270, 30-06, 7 Mag and 30-30. What would be the best powder. Also which takes small and large primers.

    Also about how many 45 rounds would be in 1 pound of powder.

    Also about how many 7 Mag rounds would be in a pound of powder.

    Thanks David
  • oscar meyeroscar meyer Member Posts: 79 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I am new to reloading:

    I was full length resizing and decapping some .223 once fired brass.
    I had previously cleaned it in stainless steel media.
    I broke a decapping pin and thought maybe i had a crimped in primer? So i took a look at the case and this was not the case. so i replaced the pin and continued. About a dozen cases later same thing happens. So i look in the case and i see 2-3 stainless pins wedged in the bottom of the case. Heres the question: 1. What are the ramifications of the pins remaining in the case(I.E. missed when i decapped the case)2.Has anybody else had this issue? If so what is the remedy for correcting this...short of the obvious answer which is visually inspect every case or stop using S.S. media. Thanks for you help.
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,346 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I think you should check the cases before sizing.
  • andrewsw16andrewsw16 Member Posts: 10,729 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I use crushed walnut shell media. It has never caused breakage of any steel part. Maybe a solution.

    Second reply, after reading other responses. There seems to be a serious time and steps price to pay for using SSM. What with tumbling, washing, using magnets, retumbling, etc. They may have to vibrate a few minutes longer using walnut, but that is the extent of the procedure. Vibrate for the required time, sift out the cases, then reload. Easy Peazy. The cases are perfectly shiny and clean and you can leave out all those other steps. If by chance a grain of walnut shell somehow stays in the case, no big deal as it will not break a steel decapping pin. [:D]
  • oscar meyeroscar meyer Member Posts: 79 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks for the input i posted this in reloading as well ....thats where i should have put it to begin with.. maybe a mod will come along and poof this one or lock it.
  • nononsensenononsense Member Posts: 10,934 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    oscar meyer,

    I see no reason to delete this topic as having it posted in both forums will get a cross section of responses. It's a good topic to cover.

    quote:I use crushed walnut shell media. It has never caused breakage of any steel part. Maybe a solution.

    On the surface this appears to be a simple, yet disarming remark. In reality though, the SSM is by far superior to any of the other processes including walnut or corn cob. There is no comparison as to the speed and cleanliness achieved when using SSM. None.

    Solving the problem is simple though. Just look inside every case prior to performing any of the later tasks.

    Best.
  • Riomouse911Riomouse911 Member Posts: 3,493 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I'm gonna state the obvious...that if you keep using that cleaning media, you're going to keep getting the same results. After at least 15 years reloading, all I can say is the standard cleaning medias with a dollop of case cleaning solution once in a while will do you just fine...and won't break pins if they're stuck in flash holes or primer pockets.

    Stay safe!
  • Mort4570Mort4570 Member Posts: 472 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    all the posts I"ve seen re: steel pin media,they decap 1st as the pins will even shine the primer pockets.Whether this will solve your problem,i'm not sure.
  • oscar meyeroscar meyer Member Posts: 79 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks to all.. it just did not occur to me that they would or could get stuck in there like that!! I am learning every time i sit down and process brass. Looks like i have about 1000 cases to inspect the insides on. Lesson learned thankfully the only damage was to a few decapping pins and not anything worse.
  • gunnut505gunnut505 Member Posts: 10,290
    edited November -1
    Easy Fix: Get yourself an old speaker from that busted car stereo you keep in the garage, and mount it next to your tumbler.
    Pass each case over the speakers' magnet, case mouth down, and any errant media will jump onto the magnet and out of your cases.
    You still have to look at each case (you should, anyway!), but this will remove any loose media, and hang on to it for you.
  • JimmyJackJimmyJack Member Posts: 4,853 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I thought stainless wasnt magnetic?
  • RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,538 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by JimmyJack
    I thought stainless wasnt magnetic?


    depends on grade.
  • dcs shootersdcs shooters Member Posts: 10,969
    edited November -1
    Get a decapping die. They don't resize, just push the primer out.
  • distinguisheddistinguished Member Posts: 62
    edited November -1
    I deprime my cases prior to running them in the SS media with either with a Havey deprimer or a decapping die, I do this so I have nice clean primer pockets more than anything else.
    I visually inspect all cases after cleaning but before anything else for defects of any kind including media stuck in them.
    With how well the SS system cleans it is much easier to spot defects once the whole case is cleaned inside and out.
  • NavybatNavybat Member Posts: 6,831 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    One last suggestion...make sure your decapping pin is TIGHT on the die. If it's loose, it may bend...and not hit the primer, but will instead hit the case rim, breaking it. I've broken several pins that way before I figured it out.
  • JustCJustC Member Posts: 16,055 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    if you had a media seperator (or whatever they are called) this would not be a problem. You place the cases in a rotating bin and them turn the bin for a minute or two. Any media inside the cases will be knocked loose from the cases tumbling around, and will find it's way out of the cases, through the holes in the bin, and drop into the base container.

    http://www.opticsplanet.com/rcbs-rotary-case-media-separator-87076.html?gclid=CMjsrILHsbcCFcad4AodiWoAbg&ef_id=UaDWdAAABZkOjwT-:20130525151916:s
  • oscar meyeroscar meyer Member Posts: 79 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Justc...These pins were firmly lodged in the base of these .223 cases. They had to be removed with a pick! No ammount of tumbling was going to dislodge them.
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,346 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The lee design with a collet grip on the decapping rod is nice. Have had rod slide up several times from a small rimless autoloader case getting stuck in my rimmed wheel gun cases. Would have broken the pin or perhaps bent the rod in regular dies. Plus I keep a separate sack for range pickups. Less dirt and no surprises in my stuff.
  • yonsonyonson Member Posts: 756 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Failure to visually inspect every case is an accident waiting to happen, IMHO. Don't leave it to chance.
    Some "stainless steels" have enough ferrous content for magnets to work on them, some don't. Again, making assumptions is not safe when explosions can result.
  • shoff14shoff14 Member Posts: 11,994 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If loading on a single stage press, I would tumble in walnut to remove dirt, size, SSM tumble, then load. The SSM does a wonderful job at removing the dirt and grime inside the case and primer pocket. It can't do that if the primer is still there. The chances of a piece of SSM getting stuck in the primer hole is a lot less likely with the primer not there.
  • oscar meyeroscar meyer Member Posts: 79 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    These pins were not stuck in the flash hole or the primer pocket. They were wedged in the bottom of the case length wise!
  • shoff14shoff14 Member Posts: 11,994 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I think if you had fluid coming from both directions in the case, you may find the ssm doesn't get stuck in the end. This is just a guess though, try it and see.
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