.

Lee Pro1000

RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,195 ✭✭✭
Was thinking about trying one for 9mm and was hopping to get some input from those who have/had one. I figure I could trip one of my Rock Chucker kits (I have three), I only use two of them anyhow.

Comments

  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,348 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I think that they are ok. I have help set up a few of them. I don't own or use progressives but I don't spray and pray either.
  • geeguygeeguy Member Posts: 1,047
    edited November -1
    I have met many people that have that model (but I don't own one). They seem to be better then the earlier models but still have problems with powder dropping. Will they make good bullets, yes, for awhile. The parts do wear out quickly if you load a lot. Most of the guys I shoot pistol with start with Lee and switch after about 1-2 years.

    If you are only loading pistol you may wish to consider a good used Dillon Square Deal which lasts for ever. An option would be to convert one of your rock chuckers to a turrent, while not as fast as a true progressive it gives you a little better control.

    While I love some of the new products Lee is making, their progressive machines could be a lot better. The purest here will say go straight to Dillon or Hornady, which is not bad advise.

    Good luck.
  • pirate2501pirate2501 Member Posts: 1,851 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have a Lee Progressive 1000. I load 380 ACP, 9MM, 38SPL and 40 S&W. After wasting alot of time to change the dies (3) and then readjusting them, I bought a turret and shellplate carrier for each caliber. I don't use the case feeder (place them in by hand) and also place the bullets in by hand. Also installed a separate powder feed disc system for each caliber. When you change calibers there is some adjusting in the beginning. One problem is if it gets out of sync the primer might jam in the feed tube or under the shellplate carrier. Once I get it running I usually can reload about 90 to 110 rounds an hour. It is a little frustrating right out of the box but with a little patience and some checks now and then I feel it's worth the money.
  • iceracerxiceracerx Member Posts: 8,807 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    As a former owner of a Lee Pro1000 I can honestly say they make a mighty fine canoe anchor. They are finicky, prone to getting dirty which will stop them from operating, and, as already posted, almost REQUIRE a different shell plate carrier for each caliber which only slows the aggravation of needing adjustment. I'm also not impressed with the primer feed system.

    I rebuilt mine before loaning it to a friend (so I guess I still own it and have placed the friend ship in jeopardy[;)].) and with zero support on replacement bits, that cost almost as much as a new press.

    I switched to Dillon products and haven't looked back.
  • the middlethe middle Member Posts: 3,089
    edited November -1
    They are good entry level, cheap, progressive...if you are ready for progressive.

    The primer system just plain does not work...no matter how hard you try to make it.....so when I use it, I use it to deprime, then prime with a hand primer, then refill the case feeder and load. You can really crank the handle when deprimeing....its fast! Far faster then my Dillon.

    The rest, once adjusted and set up, works very well..case feeder and all, and yes, it spills a little powder....so does my Dillon...no big deal. Getting them set up the first time can be a little aggravating, but once you do it a few times, it gets easier.

    What nice about them is they are cheap, yet they do last a while. I could have bought 5 whole Pro-1000 set ups for the cost of my Dillon and its gear.

    Once you get to know it, and know how to adjust it, you can change the shell plate and caliber pretty damn fast....my Dillon takes longer....

    There is no doubt better built stuff out there, but other than the priming system, the others dont work any better than the Lee, they just cost more.
  • RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,195 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    For 170 bucks delivered I think I might try one. I read that CCI primers work best with the feeder.
  • RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,195 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by geeguy
    I have met many people that have that model (but I don't own one). They seem to be better then the earlier models but still have problems with powder dropping. Will they make good bullets, yes, for awhile. The parts do wear out quickly if you load a lot. Most of the guys I shoot pistol with start with Lee and switch after about 1-2 years.

    If you are only loading pistol you may wish to consider a good used Dillon Square Deal which lasts for ever. An option would be to convert one of your rock chuckers to a turrent, while not as fast as a true progressive it gives you a little better control.

    While I love some of the new products Lee is making, their progressive machines could be a lot better. The purest here will say go straight to Dillon or Hornady, which is not bad advise.

    Good luck.



    I took a look at the Square Deal over on Graffs site. The ? I have is, is the press easy to switch from say 9mm to 45acp. I am not looking to be cheap about it. I shoot a lot of 223 in my AR's so maybe I need to look at something that can do both.
  • the middlethe middle Member Posts: 3,089
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by RobOz
    quote:Originally posted by geeguy
    I have met many people that have that model (but I don't own one). They seem to be better then the earlier models but still have problems with powder dropping. Will they make good bullets, yes, for awhile. The parts do wear out quickly if you load a lot. Most of the guys I shoot pistol with start with Lee and switch after about 1-2 years.

    If you are only loading pistol you may wish to consider a good used Dillon Square Deal which lasts for ever. An option would be to convert one of your rock chuckers to a turrent, while not as fast as a true progressive it gives you a little better control.

    While I love some of the new products Lee is making, their progressive machines could be a lot better. The purest here will say go straight to Dillon or Hornady, which is not bad advise.

    Good luck.



    I took a look at the Square Deal over on Graffs site. The ? I have is, is the press easy to switch from say 9mm to 45acp. I am not looking to be cheap about it. I shoot a lot of 223 in my AR's so maybe I need to look at something that can do both.


    The square deal is a kick * press, but its a giant PITA to change calibers on it.

    If you want to both, or just about any caliber up to 50BMG...get a RL550B...it will do it all. Fairly quick and easy to change calibers.
  • geeguygeeguy Member Posts: 1,047
    edited November -1
    RobOz: The change over for a Square deal takes me about 10 minutes "IF" you don't need to change primer size, and about 20 minutes if changing primer size.

    If you are loading .223, 9mm, and .45ACP you may wish to consider the 550 model which can do all above. While I own numerous progressive machines I do find my turret machines to be a nice medium between a single and a progressive. You may not be sorry with the Lee progressive, but you won't be sorry with a Hornady or a Dillon. All three do take a few bucks to set up parts for easy change over. Sometimes the "rate" per hour is overrated as a factor. I consider the "problem factor" to be my main consideration, and frustration. All progressives WILL create a problem sooner or later (normally sooner if you have never used one)and it can be very frustrating, which is why most people here will tell you Dillon, they just get parts right out and answer questions in a professional manner for new and experienced reloaders.

    Tuff choice to pass over the Lee due to the price, but depends on your frustration level vs. cost. If you are going to keep loading for many years (since you already own 3 machines I assume you will)the least expensive is a good quality machine.

    Good luck
  • Riomouse911Riomouse911 Member Posts: 3,468 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The Pro 1000 primer system is useless. I have 2 of them..one for .44 Mag-Spl and .45 colt, one for .38/.357.

    I tumble the brass then resize with only the decapping die in place. I then hand-prime, and then charge the cases and seat the bullet with the decapping die removed. To make this easier I bought spare die holders, so they can be switched out in under a minute.

    My little system is waaaaay slower than true "progessive reloading," but at least the cases get primed without a sideways primer, a missing primer, etc.
  • dcs shootersdcs shooters Member Posts: 10,969
    edited November -1
    Got rid of the POS one I had because of the priming system, went with DILLON [^]
  • jonkjonk Member Posts: 10,121
    edited November -1
    I have a friend who loads commercially and they are all he uses. That gets a lot of stares. He has one set up for each caliber he loads for; he tells me his 9mm dedicated press has easily over 1,000,000 rounds through it and all he has ever worn out was the primer sensor spring and one plastic gear about 200,000 rounds ago.

    I haven't used mine anywhere near that much. My impression is the only downside to it is the primer feed. This can be made to work with some polishing and religiously keeping the tray at least half full, but it IS finicky. As said, yes, it dribbles a little powder, but we're talking maybe 5 grains over 500 rounds.

    It IS only good for pistol or short, short rifle- .223 and 7.62X39 for instance.
  • shoff14shoff14 Member Posts: 11,994 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I had two of them set up for 45ACP and 9mm. For the money they are hard to beat. With that said the presses leave a lot to be desired in design and materials. I now load on a lock and load AP press and you couldn't give a pro 1000 to me.
  • rongrong Member Posts: 8,459
    edited November -1
    Crap!---nuff said
  • chiefrchiefr Member Posts: 11,079 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have tinkered with about 3 of them. If you like tinkering, adusting, continuously, dealing with priming issues and constantly troubleshooting problems by all means buy one. You may be lucky enough to load 200 an hour before something else breaks, jams, or needs adjusting..... thats about what you can do troublefree with a single stage and hand held primer!!

    I was lucky enough to get rid of mine which I ended up with in a trade, even though I owned Dillons.
    I have been reloading for 40 years and I haven't seen a progressive this problematic since the "Green Machines" If there are any around who remember those duds.

    Also was called to help several other friends of mine who bought Pro 1000s. They wanted a progressive but thought a Dillon was too expensive. After finding out how difficult these things are to keep running, they went and spent the extra $150 and bought Dillion.
    My advice: Dillon
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