.

7mm Rem Mag reloading ???

4406v4406v Member Posts: 317 ✭✭✭
I am new to reloading and have a few questions for the experts.

I started reloading with the Hornady Third edition manual.I loaded rounds for IMR4831 using 154gr Hornady SST bullets.It shows the max load to be 65.4gr and 3,000 fps.I loaded rounds for 2700,2800,2900, and 3,000fps and went to the range.I found the 3,000fps load gave me the tightest group.I found no evidence of casing damage after close inspection.

Last weekend I went to Cabela's and bought more powder.While I was there I picked up the 9th edition Hornady manual.When I checked the load data it lists the max load for IMR4831 and 154gr bullets as 59.1gr and 2,800fps.Is it safe to continue to use the 3,000fps loads?Or should I follow the most current manual.

Comments

  • MIKE WISKEYMIKE WISKEY Member Posts: 9,295 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    a LOT of manuals have been lawyer'ed up, if it works, it works.
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,348 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    4831 is fairly slow. The 264 Win Mag can hold more of it than is good for it. Back in the day I did not even weigh it. Fill a 06 case full, stomp on a bullet and let it rip. A 5 gallon bucket of pulled 172 gr boat tails (a cent each) and many paper lunch bags of 4831 ($2/#).

    For my 7 Rem Mag I load almost a full case of T870 and a 162 boat tail. I think ball powder(s) burns cooler and will help prolong barrel life. They also run nicely in powder measures.

    Loading data is written/published to be safe for all guns. The newer strain gage method of pressure measurement does a better job of catching the spikes than the old copper crusher method IMHO.

    Sometimes powders change. Blue Dot from the Aliant folks is hotter than the older Hercules. I have a bunch of 44 Mag that are winter only loads now.

    You are using a dial caliper to check the case head expansion?
  • MG1890MG1890 Member Posts: 4,649
    edited November -1
    I learned a long time ago - pick 1 manual & use it. All manuals have conflicting information, you will go nuts when a max load in 1 manual is a starting load in a different manual.

    Every barrel, every chamber has unique characteristics that would cause the "maximum" load to change. If your barrel likes this load, and the case heads are not expanding, then use it.

    Try repriming 1 of your fired cases. If the primer slips in much easier than last time, the case head is expanding, and you should reduce the load.

    BTW, bullet seating depth can have a tremendous effect on chamber pressure, and the manuals cannot address the distance that the bullet is seated away from the throat. You can.
  • MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 11,548 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I ALWAYS consult at least two current reloading manuals when loading near the maximum. Did you shoot your loads over a chrono or are you relating what the manual claimed as 3000fps. 6.3 grains is a considerable variance in max load even with a 7mag and 4831. You should also know that changing powder lots usually requires at least a slight charge reduction and work up to max again.
  • bambambambambambam Member Posts: 4,801 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    When I load for my 7mm Rem Mag I found that the bullet manuf info is the better info to use.

    I called both Hodgdon & Hornady & the reason their info is so different is because one calls for crimped loads which I will never do for a bolt gun.

    Can't comment on your load even though I use the SST bullets because I use only Hodgdon Extreme powder. H4350, H 4831SC, H1000
  • 4406v4406v Member Posts: 317 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have both the 3rd edition and now 9th edition Hornady manuals.This is what started me questioning the load data I have already used.Has IMR4831 changed? I am new to this so I measure everything exact to the kernel of powder.I checked the head spacing of my rifle and carefully size every shell,every time.

    I will measure the case heads to check for expansion.But the once fired brass I re-loaded seemed like the primers seated normally.

    I figured the manuals are a guide line of what's safe to shoot in any rifle.They are not even close to a dangerous level in most guns.If I hadn't bought the 9th edition manual I wouldn't even be asking the questions.Fact is the 65.4 gr load shoots well out of my gun.Looking at the ballistics of the factory Remington core-lock 150gr loads I've shot for 25 years it seems the 65.4 gr load is in line.If it was a safe load in 1987 shouldn't it still be safe today?
  • MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 11,548 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    the 3rd and the 9th editions"??
    That's not what I meant. A CURRENT selection like one each from powder and bullet manufacturer plus another independent like the Lyman(definitely not Richard Lee's compilation of data from other manuals).
    Most magnum loads will max out around 63,000 psi which is plenty hefty even for the best actions.
    I was sitting behind a 257 Wby that self destructed on the 3rd shot of a fairly conservative load and wouldn't wish the outcome on most folks(maybe some lawyers and politicians).
  • bambambambambambam Member Posts: 4,801 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    When I load for my 7mm Rem Mag I found that the bullet manuf info is the better info to use.

    I called both Hodgdon & Hornady & the reason their info is so different is because one calls for crimped loads which I will never do for a bolt gun.

    Can't comment on your load even though I use the SST bullets because I use only Hodgdon Extreme powder. H4350, H 4831SC, H1000
  • Tailgunner1954Tailgunner1954 Member Posts: 7,815
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by 4406v
    I have both the 3rd edition and now 9th edition Hornady manuals.This is what started me questioning the load data I have already used.Has IMR4831 changed? I am new to this so I measure everything exact to the kernel of powder.I checked the head spacing of my rifle and carefully size every shell,every time.

    I will measure the case heads to check for expansion.But the once fired brass I re-loaded seemed like the primers seated normally.

    I figured the manuals are a guide line of what's safe to shoot in any rifle.They are not even close to a dangerous level in most guns.If I hadn't bought the 9th edition manual I wouldn't even be asking the questions.Fact is the 65.4 gr load shoots well out of my gun.Looking at the ballistics of the factory Remington core-lock 150gr loads I've shot for 25 years it seems the 65.4 gr load is in line.If it was a safe load in 1987 shouldn't it still be safe today?


    How do you know it was safe than?
    The biggest change in the last few years was pressure testing equipment. It is now much more sensitive than it was "back than", enough so that many of the "old standby loads" have been found to exceed SAAMI pressure specs (mostly on MIP, but many also on MAP).

    Also, each lot of powder is different. The variance can be as much as +/- 10% from lot to lot, which is why the manuals (even those from back in the 1950's, which I have in my collection of over 30 manuals ) tell you to re-work up whenever you get new powder.
  • MG1890MG1890 Member Posts: 4,649
    edited November -1
    The weakest link is the brass cartridge case. This is the device that must be considered when developing a maximum load, not a manual.

    If the case head is not expanding, the load is OK. Different lots of brass, old brass, new brass, will all have different mechanical properties that affect what the maximum load can be.

    The manuals got you in the "safe to fire" zone. Now use measurements.
Sign In or Register to comment.