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suggestions for reloading press

noww90noww90 Member Posts: 20 ✭✭
I am looking into a progressive press for Rifle and pistol. the terms I have seen are progressive and auto indexing. They seem to be the same so are they or what is the difference. Also does any one have any suggestions on type. one last question has to do with number of holes in the turret press for dies. They most dies I have are 3 dies per set. Any suggestions on this would be greatly appreciated

Comments

  • CapnMidnightCapnMidnight Member Posts: 8,520
    edited November -1
    Dillon 550. Enough said.
    W.D.
  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    I agree with W.D. if you want to load both rifle & pistol But if you want to load match grade pistol nothing beats a used Star press.
  • MobuckMobuck Member Posts: 11,434 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I'll try to answer your question.
    Auto-index often refers to the die head rotating while the lever mechanism holds one case. I use a LEE turret(auto-index) press to load .223(fully prepped and primed cases). The tool head is set up with a powder drop, neck size/powder check, seater, and crimp dies.
    Progressive usually means multiple stations perform multiple operations on multiple cases per stroke. I use a Dillon Square Deal for handgun cartridges. Set a clean case on station one and set a bullet on the charged case on station 3 and pull the handle. FourSizing/depriming on station 1. Primer seating/powder drop on station 2. Bullet seating on station 3. Final crimp on station 4 and a loaded round drops into a catch bin.
  • geeguygeeguy Member Posts: 1,047
    edited November -1
    Assuming you already own a single stage press and have experience reloading, if not, read sticky.

    Two good ones:
    1. Dillon 550 (is not auto index).
    2. Hornady.

    Even though all my progressives are Auto index it is a little over rated in production amounts and can be much more of a problem when there is a mistake. I have never owned a Dillon 550 (only SDB and 650)but I tend toward the Dillon just because of their service and available parts/conversions.

    I like at least 4 die heads.

    Best of luck
  • victorj19victorj19 Member Posts: 3,556 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by Mobuck
    I'll try to answer your question.
    Auto-index often refers to the die head rotating while the lever mechanism holds one case. I use a LEE turret(auto-index) press to load .223(fully prepped and primed cases). The tool head is set up with a powder drop, neck size/powder check, seater, and crimp dies.
    Progressive usually means multiple stations perform multiple operations on multiple cases per stroke. I use a Dillon Square Deal for handgun cartridges. Set a clean case on station one and set a bullet on the charged case on station 3 and pull the handle. FourSizing/depriming on station 1. Primer seating/powder drop on station 2. Bullet seating on station 3. Final crimp on station 4 and a loaded round drops into a catch bin.



    A clarification: The auto-index requires multiple strokes, four a Lee 4-hole auto index press per cartridge). A progressive press has a few strokes in the beginning to get started then a long string of one stroke per cartridge, then a few more strokes for the last cartridge.
  • TANK78ZTANK78Z Member Posts: 1,156 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    for higher volume use but still capable of match grade reloading the Dillon 650 is what I use, can't praise it enough.And the warrantee is unsurpassed, Dillon is a class act!
  • TANK78ZTANK78Z Member Posts: 1,156 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    for higher volume use but still capable of match grade reloading the Dillon 650 is what I use, can't praise it enough.And the warrantee is unsurpassed, Dillon is a class act!
  • geeguygeeguy Member Posts: 1,047
    edited November -1
    Victor. Maybe I am mistaken, but I believe a "progressive press" is set up the same as the Auto, except that it manually rotates (indexes) the stations, whereas the Auto Index does it normally during the "up" cycle of the handle. Both have the same stations, same start up and end round.

    A Dillon 550 in a progressive and a 650 is a progressive WITH Auto Index.

    That's the way I learned it anyways but I'm always ready to learn more.
  • toad67toad67 Member Posts: 9,838 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    As mentioned above all auto indexes are progressive, but not all progressives are auto indexing. IMO if you're starting out a progressive would be okay, but an auto indexer might cause you problems if you run out of powder and the plate keeps rotating and then you have to weigh a bunch of finished ammo to see what went wrong. The manual index is good in the sense that you can take your time to look at each one and make sure that all is good with each case. IMO the best way is to start with a used single stage until you get a good handle on the process. I have 2 auto indexers and every once in a while you get on a good run and find that your powder has bridged up and then it's ah shi*.

    Todd
  • charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 7,348 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    +1 for a powder cop die.
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