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Hard to chamber - umped shoulders?

yukon100jackyukon100jack Member Posts: 50 ✭✭
I have a problem that I can't quite figure out. I am reloading for 7mm Remington magnum and about 1/3 of my rounds range from "some resistance when closing the bolt" to "it won't chamber and will really get stuck if I push". I believe it has something to do with my case resizing method; when FL resizing some of the cases are hard to get all the way into the die and I have to use a moderate amount of force to resize. I must be doing something at that point to alter them. I trim them to 2.490 and an EMPTY case still won't chamber. Two questions... 1.)What the Heck did I do? and 2)Do I toss the bad cases or can I fix them somehow? I am starting to like the idea of neck sizing!

Comments

  • bpostbpost Member Posts: 32,221 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hold the case up to a light and place a straight edge along the case, see if your issue is pushing the shoulder back during bullet seating. It is a very common problem, almost unnoticed by many shooter. The shoulder probably shows a distinct hump at the shoulder.

    If that is not the issue you need to adjust the sizing die down more to move the shoulder back on your cases. Brass does work harden, cases fired more will spring back more and account for the difference in effort.

    You are using Imperial sizing wax, Right?
  • n/an/a Member Posts: 168,427
    edited November -1
    You said an empty case won't stick...are you seating your bullets too far out (into the lands)???
  • JustCJustC Member Posts: 16,055 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    if the case is not loaded and won't chamber after sizing, try backing the sizing die off 1/2-1 turn.

    If this happens after seating, then your seater die is turned into the press too far, and you are bulging the shoulder/body junction
  • sandwarriorsandwarrior Member Posts: 5,453 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    On what Bpost said:

    Also look to see if the case is bulging just in front of the 'belt'. You may need to size more not less.

    On what ECC said:

    First check to see if the unsized case fits, then the sized case, then set your seater die where it needs to be by finding the lands and seating the bullet to that depth. Will follow up if need by several of us.

    On what JustC says:

    I'm thinking that in different terms he's saying what Bpost did. Check that and also check the bulge in front of the 'belt'.

    You may also need to check your technique in that you have a) set the die deep enough that the shoulder isn't blocking the case from chambering and two, that you aren't in some way keeping the case from going all the way into the die. (such as not aligning linkage in the press?)
    To full length I always set the empty shellholder so it just cams over with a little force.

    As Bpost noted using Imperial sizing wax is an excellent way to ensure the movement of brass over steel (while the case is going into the die {or out}) isn't causing unneeded stretch of the case.

    Edit:

    As usual I always seem to miss something. I oftentimes find it's during the seating that you get a bulge in the shoulder. I always set the die up by putting a case in the die and running it up. I then screw the die down onto the case until it firmly stops. I then take and screw out the seater stem until I know the bullet is too long when seated. I measure the COAL. I then double check the seater stem threads and screw it down accordingly to how far mathematically it should go. i.e. if you have a tpi of 20 on the seater stem, then you have .050" per turn of stem. Say you have a case that is 3.325" and you need to get to 3.295" You have .030" to move down so turn the stem in 1/2 turn (180 deg.). Seat and check. You should be at 3.300" If you are still long by .005" as I think you should, then turn 30 deg (1/3 of 1/4 turn). It should then be a matter of a tiny turn to get the seating depth exact. Remember to subtract some if you want the bullet seated in the lands.
  • CHEVELLE427CHEVELLE427 Member Posts: 6,750
    edited November -1
    edit [:I] didn't not see the part about the empty case still wont chamber

    some of my loads for the K31 would not chamber, had to seat the bullet just a little deeper, then all was good.
  • badlandsbutchbadlandsbutch Member Posts: 188 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Use a Wilson chamber guage to adjust the shoulder (headspace) of the sizing die.
    Will also show if you need to trim.
  • CHEVELLE427CHEVELLE427 Member Posts: 6,750
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by badlandsbutch
    Use a Wilson chamber Gage to adjust the shoulder (head space) of the sizing die.
    Will also show if you need to trim.


    i have some for 44mag 45acp 40 and 10mm, but i picked up one for a 243 and the case wont even think about going in it all the way, not even new stuff, it has to be numbered wrong.

    i have found that some of my 45acp that fits the Gage wont chamber in my older 1911, but after i run it through a lee carbide OAL resize die it works fine
  • bentley47bentley47 Member Posts: 78 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Disclaimer - I have not loaded many magnums, but a long time buddy of mine has. He has mentioned the sizing problem and he feels it is the belt, which can't be resized (and should not need to be).
    Second disclainer [:)]- his solution is lightly polishing the belted part of the chamber of the rifle.
    I don't know that I would do that, but he claims it solves the problem and he can reload magnums until the necks split. FWIW
  • yukon100jackyukon100jack Member Posts: 50 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks all for the suggestions. The problem has been solved and it boiled down to not sizing the case far enough into the die. I have had the unfortunate experience of getting a few cases stuck in dies and have become paranoid of repeating the situation. As a consequence I was reluctant to push the case up too high when the resistance was getting really hard. The stuck cases happened when I used Hornady One Shot lube. Now I use Lee case lube liberally on each case and wipe it off right after it comes out of the die. It is easier to clean off before it dries. Ths cases chamber without a problem. The only problem I am having now is my nickel cases are scuffed for about the last 1/2" of sizing and some of them have the nickel coating worn completely off on the last 1/8". I can live with the cosmetic defect and will take it over cases that won't chamber any day.
  • bpostbpost Member Posts: 32,221 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by yukon100jack
    Thanks all for the suggestions. The problem has been solved and it boiled down to not sizing the case far enough into the die. I have had the unfortunate experience of getting a few cases stuck in dies and have become paranoid of repeating the situation. As a consequence I was reluctant to push the case up too high when the resistance was getting really hard. The stuck cases happened when I used Hornady One Shot lube. Now I use Lee case lube liberally on each case and wipe it off right after it comes out of the die. It is easier to clean off before it dries. Ths cases chamber without a problem. The only problem I am having now is my nickel cases are scuffed for about the last 1/2" of sizing and some of them have the nickel coating worn completely off on the last 1/8". I can live with the cosmetic defect and will take it over cases that won't chamber any day.


    Use Imperial sizing wax, used lightly on your fingers will eliminate stuck cases, keep lube off the shoulder make sure you get some on the base area of the case...... The scratches you see are from dirt in your die. Clean it with carb cleaner and then polish the inside with fine polishing compound, a tight fitting rag and a drill.
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