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New to Reloading

I've been shooting on a limited basis for years and now getting into reloading. I have a turret press, die sets for both size ammo I will be loading, and a scale (all a gift). Were can I get a good book with illistrations, and a source of reference to begin the process. I'm mechanically inclinded but have even seen someone reload before. If there is a total beginning I'm starting there.

thanks for the help
Oh and I'll be loading ACP.45 and ruger .480 if that helps.

Comments

  • FISHERRIDGESPORTINGFISHERRIDGESPORTING Member Posts: 132 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I'm just starting into pistol ammo reloading...How does one determine the number of times brass can be reloaded? Standard powder charges...Nothing 'hot' or 'wildcat'.

    Thanks
    Mike
  • FISHERRIDGESPORTINGFISHERRIDGESPORTING Member Posts: 132 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    i am thinking of starting to reload. I dont know what i will need i found this and am planning on getting it what else will i need?

    http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/content/p/9/pid/25237/catid/1/Dillon_Square_Deal___039_B__039_

    thanks for your time
  • FISHERRIDGESPORTINGFISHERRIDGESPORTING Member Posts: 132 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thinking of getting into reloading my own cartridges and doing some research on GB, but no idea where to start. I have 7.62x54r, and if I end up liking it will want to be able to branch out to different calibers. Any tips on where to start? Books to read? Suggested starter kits. Thanks
  • FISHERRIDGESPORTINGFISHERRIDGESPORTING Member Posts: 132 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I have been given a complete reloading setup in .45ACP. Now all I need is pointed in the right direction in getting bullets. Just looking for some can shooting plinker rounds made of lead. 225 grain would be about where I would think I need to be. If not feel free to educate me. I have a source of brass and primers are easy to find.

    Thanks for any help for a newbie trying his hand at cutting costs to continue to shoot.
  • FISHERRIDGESPORTINGFISHERRIDGESPORTING Member Posts: 132 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    retired, plenty of time, small farm, 25 & 100 yd range, small shop,
    use lee challanger for basic, & lee c frame to seat bullets. hand dip each case, use hp38 powder for 5 handgun cal. use h4895 for 3 mil surplus cal. keep it simple stupid! also cast lead bullets for same. do any other reloaders follow a routine like this?
  • FISHERRIDGESPORTINGFISHERRIDGESPORTING Member Posts: 132 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I am molding my own lead bullets, There is a grooved ring all the way around the base. Is there something that should fill it? The lead is already lubed and sized. Have seen some lead bullets with a waxy type substance in this groove before.
  • FISHERRIDGESPORTINGFISHERRIDGESPORTING Member Posts: 132 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    How do you know how to adjust the dies? There is a collar adjustment on most, what is the proper way to set these up and adjust them correctly?
  • Tailgunner1954Tailgunner1954 Member Posts: 7,815
    edited November -1
    Might I suggest you purchase a good loading manual? Sierra and Nosler are my personal favorates. ABC's of Reloading is also good at providing information and is aimed at those new to reloading.

    In general, the "collar" your refering to is properly known as the lock nut.
    For a sizing die you can simply bring the die down into contact with the shellholder (at the top of the ram stroke) and lock it there. Advanced reloaders usually don't do it this way, but set the die to just kiss the shoulder by a couple thousanths.
  • shoff14shoff14 Member Posts: 11,994 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    From the list of calibers you listed, you need the Lyman manual.
  • sandwarriorsandwarrior Member Posts: 5,599
    edited November -1
    If you bought those dies new there should be instructions with them to help you get them set up right. With bolt guns I usually do as tailgunner said and the base just comes up and 'kisses' the die. With semi-auto's such as my AR-15's I cam over with quite a bit of force. Not so much I torque the press out of shape but the cam-over is a pretty good sized force in itself. The press handle will still seem relatively easy to move up and down. But, you will certainly feel the cam force as you go through it. This is to make sure your rounds are sized small enough so that they chamber completely and extract with relative ease.

    When shooting a bolt gun you don't need as much lattitude in size to get a cartridge to fit. You also aren't relying on a spring to get the cartridge all the way into the chamber. You force it by hand then cam the bolt down to make it fit. (although, you don't need to size them that little).

    With some practice you will soon learn to split where the die needs to be for each rifle and why. It will make reloading a joy instead of a chore.

    -good luck
  • lexusmgrlexusmgr Member Posts: 11 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    All dies come with instructions. Usually in the box with the set. Read them more than once untill you understand what to do, and then follow the steps one by one. For pistols, there are three or four dies. Rifles usually two.
    Adjust them by "feel" with your fingers and test out with a few cases before securing the settings. Use all the same brand brass since it may vary in length. Seaparate accordingly.
    Do all your brass one step at the time, sizing and decapping, expanding and primming and finally bullet seating with or without crimping. Take your time and double check several times before finalizing your bullets. I do a few dummy rounds to drop test in the barrels of the guns to make sure they fit. Measure with a good grade caliper to be sure it meets manufacturing dimensions. TAKE YOUR TIME! never hurry the process. Always check and double check. Be patient and you should be able to produce top notch ammo for any caliber.
    Hope this helps. Remember- safety first!
  • gknaka2gknaka2 Member Posts: 461 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Dont be a tough guy...wear safety glasses.
  • sandwarriorsandwarrior Member Posts: 5,599
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by gknaka2
    Dont be a tough guy...wear safety glasses.


    +1! I think it saved my eyes probably as I had a small rifle primer blow off though my hand seater last fall. It never hurts to point the brass away from your face when hand priming either. Maybe not massive damage to an eye, but I did have tiny little burn flecks on my face from it.

    Take care and enjoy this. Handloading is still the only way to go in my mind.
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