.

New to reloading questions

ramdinoramdino Member Posts: 38 ✭✭
I am brand new to reloading. Just started my bench and got a dumb question. I am looking through my Lyman book at the powder amounts. I am going to be loading 223. The larger the grain bullet the longer correct? The longer the bullet , the more contact with the case correct? If those are correct i would assume that the heavier the bullet and the more contact with the case the more powder would be required to propel it. But when I look at 55 grain using Varget it uses 25 grain ( min load ) and the 69 gain uses 23.4 grains. Why less for a heavier bullet that contacts the casing more?
Another question is does it matter as far as powder loading what brand bullet you use or do you go solely by then weight of the bullet. I understand that different bullets perform different but my main concern is blowing something up in the rifle.

Comments

  • ramdinoramdino Member Posts: 38 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    After thinking about it for too long I finally took the first steps and ordered a reloading press ( lee anniversary and .45 dies )
    I know I still need a tumbler and cleaning medium to prepare the cases. The dies are carbide and it says they require no lubrication; Does this mean I don't have to lube the cases?
    A friend suggested a tray to hold the shells; Can I use the trays the shells come with new from the factory? I've been saving my spent shells for awhile now.
    Any other suggestions?[?]
  • perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    DO NOT try to use logic on how much powder to use in a load compared to bullet weight . You will find that the burning of smokeless powder is different then what you would expect. Smokeless powder is PROGRESSIVE this means the harder it is to push a bullet down a barrel from a dead stand still to say 2700 feet per second the more pressure will be produced by the same amount of powder. Say with a 30/06 if you used a 110 grain bullet with max load of powder and then loaded a 220 grain bullet with same powder charge of powder you would more then likely destroy the rifle and injure yourself[xx(][:(][V]. If you can't find a load in a reloading Manual then DO NOT try to make up a load using what you THINK is sound logic.
  • shoff14shoff14 Member Posts: 11,994 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    A heavier bullet is harder to propel than a lighter bullet. However, the amount of contact with the case will be close to the same depending on bullet length and weight. You can have a decrease in case capacity with a larger bullet in comparison to a smaller bullet. Because heavier bullets are harder to propel and reduce the case capacity, and it takes slightly longer for the bullet to exit the cartridge the pressure would be higher if you used the same amount of powder as a smaller bullet. Pressure is your main concern, longer bullets will create more pressure than a shorter bullet. Someone with more exact physics knowledge can probably give you more information on this.

    For your other question. I like to use the bullet manufacturers information first, then verify it with another book. The more information you can get, the better off you will be. Start from min and work your way up.
  • ramdinoramdino Member Posts: 38 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    OK Got it on the pressure. That makes perfect sense to me know that the veil has been lifted. What about for bullets that do not have a manufactures manual. Like these Lake City bullets I see on GB. Do you just use the minimum loads from the Lyman manual?
    Does case brand matter? Can I use winchester or remington for 223?
  • zimmdenzimmden Member Posts: 238 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Welcome to reloading and the Forum. You are starting right by reading and asking questions. DON"T reload by assuming. Reload by info in good books and most powder or bullet manuals. Heavier bullets always result in increased pressure with same powder. Changing one component for a listed load always changes the results. Most powder manuals list bullets by weight (not brand) for their approved loads. Keep reading, keep asking questions and keep learning to stay safe.
  • jonkjonk Member Posts: 10,121
    edited November -1
    If you don't find the exact bullet listed in your reloading manual, start with the start load for one of the same weight and work up 1/2 gr of powder at a time to the max listed for that bullet weight. Bullet shape and profile can affect max loads a bit. If you start to see flattened primers or cratered primers you are too hot.

    While I have worked up loads that aren't in books, for a .223 it isn't necessary. For a .41 Swiss or 8X60R Kropatschek there is a dearth of data so it starts to become needed; however for the novice reloader with a common round with thousands of published loads, DO NOT do this!

    After you've been reloading for 10 or 20 years, and you find yourself with a real oddball cartridge, have a chronograph and know pressure signs inside and out, feel free to VERY carefully try it. But your initial question shows you are just getting into it and don't know the principles of it yet.

    To expand on what has been said- there are different powders with different burn rates. Some are very fast. Some are very slow. Faster powders increase in pressure quickly the more you add or the heavier the bullet. Slower powders are usually more forgiving. For instance, whether using a 40 gr bullet or 90 gr bullet, you probably couldn't cram enough IMR 4350 into a .223 to cause any harm. It's a slow powder, and not ideal in the cartridge. On the other hand, using IMR 4198, a moderately fast powder, you could easily run in to trouble by using a heavy bullet over the same powder load that is safe with a light bullet.

    Stick to published loads and all will be well. Welcome to the hobby!
  • OakieOakie Member Posts: 38,633 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by perry shooter
    DO NOT try to use logic on how much powder to use in a load compared to bullet weight . You will find that the burning of smokeless powder is different then what you would expect. Smokeless powder is PROGRESSIVE this means the harder it is to push a bullet down a barrel from a dead stand still to say 2700 feet per second the more pressure will be produced by the same amount of powder. Say with a 30/06 if you used a 110 grain bullet with max load of powder and then loaded a 220 grain bullet with same powder charge of powder you would more then likely destroy the rifle and injure yourself[xx(][:(][V]. If you can't find a load in a reloading Manual then DO NOT try to make up a load using what you THINK is sound logic.

    +++1 Keep reading and follow the reloading manual to the letter. Trying to use logic will only get you hurt.Reloding can be fun and rewarding. Also look at The reloading room by Rocky Raab.He can answer any questions you have.
  • rongrong Member Posts: 8,459
    edited November -1
    On new loads, I always try to find
    3 sources and usually one source -mid range-
    is a max load according to another source.
    Always start low and look for pressure signs.
    Never assume anything!
    Good shooting
  • RadarRadar Member Posts: 2,504 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    In a lot of loads the most accurate are not the max loads.I have found that the 223 does like speed,so be careful.Your rifle will like one weight bullet better than some of the others. The fun is finding out which one.
  • WinMikeWinMike Member Posts: 144 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I'll echo the good advice above. One thing occurred to me as I read this thread: do you know the rifling twist of your .223?

    For example, I have two rifles in .223: one with a 1-9" twist, the other 1-12". I can fire (accurately) 69 gr. bullets in the faster twist, but not the other. The slower twist shoots lighter (45 gr.) bullets all day long into one tiny hole (and more specifically, changes sage rats into red mist).

    Nosler bullets shoot more accurately in one rifle, Sierra in the other....that's the fun part, figuring it all out.

    And there are no dumb questions!
  • ramdinoramdino Member Posts: 38 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Mine is a 1x9 chrome
  • WinMikeWinMike Member Posts: 144 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    My experience with 1-9" twist, then, is that you probably should concentrate on reloading 55 gr. and heavier. A few of the lighter bullets....especially the frangible (i.e., small varmint) may fall apart in a fast twist. One time I shot some Hornady 35 gr. @ 3800+/- fps, and they never reached a 100 yd. target, except maybe in several pieces [:0]
  • Alan RushingAlan Rushing Member Posts: 9,002 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Regarding reloading ... remember a simple truth or two:

    Pressure is your best friend,
    it can push the bullet out to where you want it to go!

    Pressure is your worst enemy,
    it can push your face and other body parts in all directions!

    (Sometimes, no one is able to put Humpty Dumpty back together again...)

    Enough of a good thing is ... usually a good thing!

    Too much of a good thing is ... always a bad thing!!!

    ((The folks above have generously shared their knowledge and experience with you ... please heed and appreciate.))
  • TaiChiTaiChi Member Posts: 179 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Ramdino did not mention which firearm he was loading for. Do the above answers apply to a bolt gun and an AR type semi auto?
  • ramdinoramdino Member Posts: 38 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    My quesiton ios based around an ar15 223 platform.
    Saftey is great advice. Published loads only for me.
  • airmungairmung Member Posts: 579 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    +1 on everything above. In addition, get reloading data from as many reliable sources as possible. Most bullet/powder makers have their reloading data online these days. Use the most up-to-date information possible. Be very very leery of loads that Uncle Harry cooked up on his own in the basement. Signs of overpressure loads can be very subtle or even impossible to detect without sophisticated equipment. You will find that published reloading data will vary considerably between manufacturers, which is frustrating and confusing, especially when you first start. Start with moderate loads first. Brass, primers, powder, and individual firearm all vary between makers and lots. Military brass, for example is usually thicker than commercial brass. This reduces case capacity which will increase pressure for a given bullet and amount of powder. Bullets, even of the same weight, of different styles or maker can change pressure. Try to find loading data from the bullet manufacturer. So don't start with max loads. Most loading manuals will tell you to reduce any max load 10% and work your way up. It is a very good idea to do this any time you use a new can of powder, change to a different primer brand or lot, change from military to commercial brass, etc. The accuracy crowd even separates their brass into mfrs. and production lots. I don't mean to be overwhelming--just want you to be safe. Study up, research things all you can, try to find an experienced reloader for a buddy, and good shooting!
Sign In or Register to comment.