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Old Reloads

mackcranemackcrane Member Posts: 1,869 ✭✭✭✭✭
I have some 30-30 reloads I made in 1972. I pulled one apart and the powder looks fine. Are these safe to shoot or should I pull them all and use new powder and primers? Thanks.

Comments

  • bambambambambambam Member Posts: 4,810 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Primers as I've been told last a VERY long time if stored properly. They should be ok if not in a humid place.
  • Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 12,870 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Shoot them - and then shoot that gun more often!
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
  • victorj19victorj19 Member Posts: 3,643 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    If there's a reason you can't just shoot alround off, you could also pull another apart (I assume you don't have the powder from the first one and you it is a smokeless powder). Take the powder outdoors and toss a match on it or use a BBQ lighter. Don't do this with blackpowder! If the powder burns, it's good. Not all of the powder may burn since it isn't encased. Then, take the empty case and fire it in the gun. I've done this indoors with hearing protection. If it goes off, good. Two goods will tell you there's an excellent probability that all of the other reloads are good.
  • dcs shootersdcs shooters Member Posts: 10,969
    edited November -1
    I've got 30-06 I loaded about '67.
    Still goes bang [:)]
  • slumlord44slumlord44 Member Posts: 3,702 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Ammo stored properly should be good indefinately. WWI and WWII ammo still works just fine it it has been properly stored.
  • Alan RushingAlan Rushing Member Posts: 9,002 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Should be good to go. [:)] [;)] [8D]
  • mackcranemackcrane Member Posts: 1,869 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Thanks guys. I'm shooting a Savage 99 made in 1912 and didn't want to damage the gun or me.
  • jonkjonk Member Posts: 10,121
    edited November -1
    I've only been on the planet since 1979. So I don't have reloads that old knocking around.

    I have however gotten lots of vintage primers and powders that were stored properly here and there- estate sales, auctions, etc.- that were fine. I regularly shoot ammo made in the 30's and 40's and its fine.

    I'd say if you checked one, and it was good, you're good to go.
  • sandwarriorsandwarrior Member Posts: 5,453 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I've shot a lot of ammo older than that. You're good to go if the powder isn't giving off an ammonia odor.

    I say shoot the rifle more often too.
  • MMMarvisMMMarvis Member Posts: 99 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I am not the final word. Its my understanding
    Primers are in 3 categories.

    Corrosive and slightly corrosive. Usually contain mercury and when stored correctly can live 80-90-100 years. Just sold the last of my 60yo '06 Match ammo.
    Reloads ?? contain burnt powder and the salts, mercury and other chemicals and contaminate the new powder so life is said to be short and varies.

    Non corrosive. It is said has a life of 50 years, And wondering about my 28yo LC 7.62.
    Reloads ?? In the 80's when i started reloading, it was said it was not good for long term storage. I thought the burnt chemicals contaminated the new powder.
    I also learned that cast bullets or some lubes used may contaminate the powder and corrode the bullet over time. So longer but varies.

    The 90's and Lead free primers.
    I have heard on some ammo 2-5 years but improving??
    Reloads ??
    This is part of the reason i am trying to talk to anybody using that stainless steel media cleaning. Soap and water in a rock polisher.
    When the insides are like new its got to be good for the long term.

    I don't know what the future of ammo and reloading is? If i load 100 hunting rounds and shoot 5-10 a year how good are the last few?

    Some chronographs of old reloads would be interesting compared to when freshly loaded.
  • bambambambambambam Member Posts: 4,810 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Interesting point about the reloaded ammo life. Never crossed my mind about the pre-existing contaminates, however small they are/aren't would be diffrent than new ammo "shelflife".
    Thanks for the info, just one more reason to shoot'em all and reload again[;)]


    quote:Originally posted by MMMarvis
    I am not the final word. Its my understanding
    Primers are in 3 categories.

    Corrosive and slightly corrosive. Usually contain mercury and when stored correctly can live 80-90-100 years. Just sold the last of my 60yo '06 Match ammo.
    Reloads ?? contain burnt powder and the salts, mercury and other chemicals and contaminate the new powder so life is said to be short and varies.

    Non corrosive. It is said has a life of 50 years, And wondering about my 28yo LC 7.62.
    Reloads ?? In the 80's when i started reloading, it was said it was not good for long term storage. I thought the burnt chemicals contaminated the new powder.
    I also learned that cast bullets or some lubes used may contaminate the powder and corrode the bullet over time. So longer but varies.

    The 90's and Lead free primers.
    I have heard on some ammo 2-5 years but improving??
    Reloads ??
    This is part of the reason i am trying to talk to anybody using that stainless steel media cleaning. Soap and water in a rock polisher.
    When the insides are like new its got to be good for the long term.

    I don't know what the future of ammo and reloading is? If i load 100 hunting rounds and shoot 5-10 a year how good are the last few?

    Some chronographs of old reloads would be interesting compared to when freshly loaded.
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