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Washing cases with vinegar?

So, at the local gun shop a guy tells me to wash my tarnished cases in vinegar for that "factory shine". Seems like that's an acid or chemical reaction and can't be good for your cases or safety. Any thoughts or wisdom? Guy says, "Really helps clean out the primer pockets!". I guess you tumble them after they dry?

Comments

  • shoff14shoff14 Member Posts: 11,994 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I washed cases with vinegar and dawn for a year before I had a tumbler. Vinegar is a very mild acid and I never saw any ill-effects to the treatment. You will not see factory shine from a vinegar and water treatment, any one claiming such is full of it. It does clean off the dirty and grime decently enough though.
  • wildeman.7.62natowildeman.7.62nato Member Posts: 201 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hmm... Fair enough. Thanks for the input.
  • Bubba Jr.Bubba Jr. Member Posts: 6,421 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I use a vinegar/water 50-50 mix with a drop of dish washing detergent in my ultrasonic cleaner. Then do a thorough rinsing with hot water. Follow up with a corn cob/Flitz cycle through the vibratory tumbler, and you get some very nice looking, clean brass.
  • jonkjonk Member Posts: 10,121
    edited November -1
    Black powder cartridge shooters swear by it.

    I use it with water and dish soap in my ultrasonic as well.

    In principle it does etch the brass slightly but you'll see a cracked neck from brass fatigue long before it eats enough to cause an issue- I'm saying it would take thousands of such cycles. I've weighed brass from cycle to cycle after cleaning and drying and some has gone through the wash 50 times and if any is lost, it isn't enough for my digital powder scale (sensitive to 1/10th of a grain) to pick up.

    It does leave a slightly dulled tarnished appearance, though cleaner than just washing in soapy water.
  • JustCJustC Member, Moderator Posts: 16,036 ******
    edited November -1
    I use white vinegar and dish soap as a rinse for the sizing wax. NEVER had a problem with case integrity. 55K+ psi is far harder on the brass than vinegar.
  • wildeman.7.62natowildeman.7.62nato Member Posts: 201 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hey, thanks everybody.
  • 243winxb243winxb Member Posts: 257 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Google "dezincification" - When cartridge brass comes in contact with vinegar, dezincification happens. Its a slow process, but brass will become weak and brittle over time.
    [url] https://saami.org [/url]
  • nononsensenononsense Member, Moderator Posts: 10,575 ******
    edited November -1
    wildeman.7.62nato,

    We get to dance with this same question frequently because of the advent of new products and services available to the reloader, fortunately.

    I am one of those indefatigable tinkers on the constant search for better cleaners and polishers that don't require so much time and energy. I have too much brass to clean to use expensive and long term processes. I finally found one that suits both my volume and time constraints.

    http://www.stainlesstumblingmedia.com/

    While this may not suit you, it is the best process/cost I've used yet. The brass comes out like new, even the primer pockets. Most reloaders are too cheap to invest in this type of brass processing but once you've tried it you won't go back to kitchen chemistry and those poor results.

    Best.
  • bartman45bartman45 Member Posts: 3,008
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by nononsense
    wildeman.7.62nato,

    We get to dance with this same question frequently because of the advent of new products and services available to the reloader, fortunately.

    I am one of those indefatigable tinkers on the constant search for better cleaners and polishers that don't require so much time and energy. I have too much brass to clean to use expensive and long term processes. I finally found one that suits both my volume and time constraints.

    http://www.stainlesstumblingmedia.com/

    While this may not suit you, it is the best process/cost I've used yet. The brass comes out like new, even the primer pockets. Most reloaders are too cheap to invest in this type of brass processing but once you've tried it you won't go back to kitchen chemistry and those poor results.

    Best.

    I agree. Cases come out without the noise, dust, time, and pieces of media hiding inside cases. One hour, using a very quiet tumbler, ss media, soap, and citric acid - cheaper than commercial stuff, the cases look like new inside and out.
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