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Another 45 lead bullet question

ToolfogieToolfogie Member Posts: 1,254 ✭✭
With help from this forum I've had great results with my 230 LRN and 200 LSWC loads.
Now I've got some 200 LRNFP bullets that I ordered by mistake and am finding very little load info for them.
Can I use data for other shapes of lead bullets?
What about C O L?
Thanks,
Gary

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    bpostbpost Member Posts: 32,664 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Sure you can use the same data as long as the bearing surface is close to your other SWC's. Load to a OAL that fits your magazine and feeds well, you may need to experiment a bit to find a good OAL that fits the bill.
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    charliemeyer007charliemeyer007 Member Posts: 6,579 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Usually it ok to use the data for the other bullet, at top end loads you can run into problems. Be interesting to see how well the flat point will feed.
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    ToolfogieToolfogie Member Posts: 1,254 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    quote:Originally posted by bpost
    Sure you can use the same data as long as the bearing surface is close to your other SWC's. Load to a OAL that fits your magazine and feeds well, you may need to experiment a bit to find a good OAL that fits the bill.


    Are you referring to the diameter of the bearing surface (in this case, both are .452) or to the length of the bearing surface?
    Thanks,
    Gary
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    perry shooterperry shooter Member Posts: 17,390
    edited November -1
    Length of bearing surface. . Have fun as long as you are Safe with how you load most of the loads you are using are MID RANGE with both pressure and velocity longer feed better but they must fully chamber and work in your magazines.
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    ToolfogieToolfogie Member Posts: 1,254 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    They seem to be working pretty good so far...

    2dbace63.jpg

    OK, so I was shooting from a rest. Not too bad for a bifocal wearin' ol' fart that hasn't fired a 45 since 1970.[:D]
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    machine gun moranmachine gun moran Member Posts: 5,198
    edited November -1
    I did it too. I was loading 45ACP's and ran out of 230RN's. I had a bunch of the 45 Colt 200-gr RNFP's, so I used 200-gr ACP data, and loaded them. They fed like a dream in the two 1911's that I shot them in.

    BTW, I read that John Browning originally designed the 45ACP with a 200-gr bullet, but that the Army wanted a 230-grainer, at lower velocity. I don't think that was the complete end of the story, however, because in the 1970's, I bought a bunch of surplus 45ACP that was headstamped FA 23. This ammo was hot! I used a kinetic puller to remove some of the bullets, and they were a 200-gr. I couldn't identify the powder.
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    CapnMidnightCapnMidnight Member Posts: 8,520
    edited November -1
    I load 200gr RNFP from Oregon Trail in my 1911s for bowling pin matches, works like a champ. I use 200gr bullets almost exclusivly in my 45 caliber 1911s, loaded over 5grs of Bullseye.
    W.D.
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    noyljnoylj Member Posts: 172 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    What do your reloading manuals say?
    In the newest Hornady load manual, they group all 121-125gn jacketed bullets, from 0.355" to 0.357" OD, with the same load data, only varying the COL.
    For the 9x19, the group all their 124gn bullets, including the swaged lead bullet, with the same loading data, again just varying COL.
    A 200 gn lead bullet is a 200 gn lead bullet. A 200gn jacketed is a 200gn jacketed. A thin Cu-plated bullet is sort of in between. Generally, it was loaded the same as the equivalent lead bullet, but Berry's, I believe, is recommended that you can go about half-way up the jacketed load data.
    You will have to determine the COL that is, generally, longer than that shown in the manual and will feed and chamber in your gun.
    Please remember, all load data is only applicable to the equipment and components used during testing and your gun may be different. Thus, they generally give very sage starting loads and it is up to you to work up the load that safely does what you want it to do.
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