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Sharps Carbine

StradivariusStradivarius Member Posts: 51 ✭✭
Hello Gents ( and lady`s ) There seems to be meany more converted Sharp carbines to choose from than original percussion carbines. I am wondering if it is possible to revers a conversion ( convert back to percussion ) on a Sharps Carbine. Over here in Sweden percussion rifles are not classed as a weapons.

All "Original" = ( pre 1890 ) rifles-pistols-revolvers-shotguns that are "Original" = Made before 1890 AND! are not built/made to shoot metal cartridges are not classed as weapons/firearms at all over here in Sweden and are therefore not subject to modern firearm legislation.

The same rules apply in the USA.... The USPS Publication 52, Article 632.2.a states that people do not need licenses for pre-1898 antique firearms.

As the rifle was "originaly" made for percussion, it is legal for me to import a "converted" rifle without the converted breechblock. BUT ! would it be possible to fit in an original percussion breech ? - Is there a big risk that it would not be a tight fit ? leak gas ?

Very greatfull for ANY ! help in this matter.

Best Regards
Stradivarius.

Comments

  • wpagewpage Member Posts: 10,187 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    That is a great question for the BATF...
  • ofitgofitg Member Posts: 359 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Sorry, I don't know the answer to your question - I never heard of anybody doing what you suggest - returning a converted Sharps to its original percussion configuration.

    I share your suspicion that it would leak. Also, the cartridge conversion included installing a liner inside the barrel - even if you replaced the breechblock, it would still not be 100% original percussion. I don't know how your laws would interpret it.

    I would guess that the safest approach is to buy an original (non-converted) percussion Sharps. I found this one on Gunbroker -

    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=163844903

    According to what I have read, any percussion Sharps will start leaking eventually, so an old original rifle might leak too. There are some modifications available which reduce this problem.
  • StradivariusStradivarius Member Posts: 51 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hello Oftig [:D] and thank you for you`r answer. I think i will take you`r advice and go for one that is not converted. When you wrote " There are some modifications available which reduce this problem. " you put a smile on my face. Would you care to share with me/us where to buy such a modification ? [:)]

    Regards
    Anthony
  • ofitgofitg Member Posts: 359 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Hello Anthony,

    I am still learning about this too. I have a reproduction percussion Sharps which leaks, and I want to get it fixed.

    I have learned that a man named Charlie Hahn (here in the U.S.) will modify the breechblock to use O-rings, and he also can modify the chamber sleeve. These modifications can fix the problem, and if the rifle ever starts leaking again, it is easy to replace his modern components.

    Charlie Hahn needs to examine the rifle to decide which modifications are needed - this could be a problem for you - I don't know if Mr. Hahn has ever shipped rifles out of the U.S. before.

    Another possible problem - ? - if Mr. Hahn modifies your rifle, would your laws still interpret it to be "original"?
  • ofitgofitg Member Posts: 359 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    Another thought.... have you considered the Smith carbine and the Gallager carbine? These were other types of percussion breech-loaders used during our 1860's war. They were not as powerful as the Sharps, but they might be satisfactory for your purposes. I see some of these advertised on Gunbroker - some were converted to fire cartridges, just like the Sharps.

    Dixie Gun Works advertises "cartridge" cases for these percussion guns - the case is loaded with powder and bullet, no primer - the external percussion cap provides ignition.

    I don't have any experience with the Smith or Gallager, so I cannot testify whether they leak or not.
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