.

Viynal plank flooring question

slumlord44slumlord44 Member Posts: 3,695 ✭✭✭
edited July 2019 in General Discussion
Instructions say to cut the floring around the toilet in a bathrom rather than sit the toilet on top of the floring. What happens if you sit the toilet on top of the florring and bolt it down? Flooring is supposed to be able to float but my experience is that it does not really move after the whole floor is down. To me there is less likely to be water leakage with the toilet on on top and caulking around the base of the toilet.

Comments

  • hillbillehillbille Member Posts: 11,386 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    only thing with putting the bolts through the planks is IF it does happen to move or expand/contract it might pull apart at the locking seam and it is near impossible to get the seam back locked without taking it apart again. while this will/may never happen I think it is more a liability issue from the manufacturer just trying to cover themselves from complaints....
  • US Military GuyUS Military Guy Member Posts: 3,272 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    The instructions were written so that you don't have to do plumbing as well as flooring.
    ;)
  • spasmcreekspasmcreek Member Posts: 38,925
    edited November -1
    some stools are so low built if you are around 6' + tall your knees are on your chin....i put one on a small platform about 1-1/2' higher than the new flooring and shaped about one inch bigger all around ...was replacing drain with new plastic so that with the ring wax was easy....when i bought the new stool they had one in the store for large people....MY LORD...i could have taken a bath in it and it cost $1000......
  • jimdeerejimdeere Member Posts: 20,349 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I would not put laminate in a bathroom, but that?s just me.
  • Mr. PerfectMr. Perfect Member Posts: 59,626 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I can't imagine why you couldn't. I've laid the stuff myself and it's dimensionally stable. Moreso than any other type of flooring.

    That said, no way in hell I would put that in a bathroom that has a wood sub floor. The seams between planks allow for water to get down under the flooring and wreak havoc on the subfloor. I've talked to countless folks that install it in bathrooms and point this out to them and they just shrug.

    The response I got from a few contractors was well it's been installed in multimillion dollar homes!

    Uhhhh, so?

    I guess that means they can afford to fix water damaged subfloors. :? :?
    Some will die in hot pursuit
    And fiery auto crashes
    Some will die in hot pursuit
    While sifting through my ashes
    Some will fall in love with life
    And drink it from a fountain
    That is pouring like an avalanche
    Coming down the mountain
  • jimdeerejimdeere Member Posts: 20,349 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    We installed it in our kitchen about 10 years ago and it?s done great. However, where the grandkids get ice from the dispenser, some pieces drop to the floor and melt. Where not wiped up immediately, it has bubbled just a tiny bit.
    Bottom line, follow the manufacturer?s instructions.
  • GilWilson1GilWilson1 Member Posts: 256 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    The floor will still "Float" just fine.
    Correctly installed vinyl laminate flooring is dang near waterproof, and as mentioned it is so you don't have to lift the toilet I would lift it you are not bolting the toilet through it just undercut around the flange.
  • GilWilson1GilWilson1 Member Posts: 256 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Not LVT if it bubbles from water
    jimdeere wrote:
    We installed it in our kitchen about 10 years ago and it?s done great. However, where the grandkids get ice from the dispenser, some pieces drop to the floor and melt. Where not wiped up immediately, it has bubbled just a tiny bit.
    Bottom line, follow the manufacturer?s instructions.
  • GilWilson1GilWilson1 Member Posts: 256 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Correctly installed VINYL plank flooring seams are tight as hell and damn near waterproof.
    I can't imagine why you couldn't. I've laid the stuff myself and it's dimensionally stable. Moreso than any other type of flooring.

    That said, no way in hell I would put that in a bathroom that has a wood sub floor. The seams between planks allow for water to get down under the flooring and wreak havoc on the subfloor. I've talked to countless folks that install it in bathrooms and point this out to them and they just shrug.

    The response I got from a few contractors was well it's been installed in multimillion dollar homes!

    Uhhhh, so?

    I guess that means they can afford to fix water damaged subfloors. :? :?
  • ProceramicProceramic Member Posts: 392 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    Remove the toilet, leave 1/2" around closet flange, reinstall toilet. It'll be fine and will be able to move. If you're really concerned about water getting to the subfloor get a small bucket of Redguard and paint roll it on to subfloor. If it was mine,I'd install over 1/4" underlayment and not directly over the subfloor.
  • Mr. PerfectMr. Perfect Member Posts: 59,626 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    GilWilson1 wrote:
    Correctly installed VINYL plank flooring seams are tight as hell and damn near waterproof.
    I can't imagine why you couldn't. I've laid the stuff myself and it's dimensionally stable. Moreso than any other type of flooring.

    That said, no way in hell I would put that in a bathroom that has a wood sub floor. The seams between planks allow for water to get down under the flooring and wreak havoc on the subfloor. I've talked to countless folks that install it in bathrooms and point this out to them and they just shrug.

    The response I got from a few contractors was well it's been installed in multimillion dollar homes!

    Uhhhh, so?

    I guess that means they can afford to fix water damaged subfloors. :? :?
    but yet not waterproof, and capillary action is also a thing that works against it.
    Some will die in hot pursuit
    And fiery auto crashes
    Some will die in hot pursuit
    While sifting through my ashes
    Some will fall in love with life
    And drink it from a fountain
    That is pouring like an avalanche
    Coming down the mountain
  • asopasop Member Posts: 7,254 ✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    I was thinking about this for a rental that has an "open" staircase. 2X's for threads. Might flex somewhat? Would this product work in such a scenario?
  • jarjar Member Posts: 575 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    this is what I do! as far as lvp it will let water thru the seams! that being said I still have customers want it in their bathrooms. the new plasitc or polymer products are waterproof but that dosent mean the water dosent get under it. the only flooring that ill not let water through is going to be ceramic tile or the old vinyl linolium flooring. to answer your question pull the stool install flooring cut right up within about a 1/4 in of toliet flang and it will be fine. as far as steps and any hard surfaces I am aginst it is slick! kids and older people will have issues. jmho! good luck.
  • castingcasting Member Posts: 116 ✭✭
    edited November -1
    I'd lay it under the toilet. Make the holes for the mount bolts bigger in your flooring. Like if they're 5/16" make them 7/16. Also you can stack wax rings to be safe. There's also silicone and closed cell foam type seals now too. I used one and they'll cover a good sized gap.
  • NeoBlackdogNeoBlackdog Member Posts: 12,566 ✭✭✭✭
    edited November -1
    GilWilson1 wrote:
    Correctly installed VINYL plank flooring seams are tight as hell and damn near waterproof.
    I can't imagine why you couldn't. I've laid the stuff myself and it's dimensionally stable. Moreso than any other type of flooring.

    That said, no way in hell I would put that in a bathroom that has a wood sub floor. The seams between planks allow for water to get down under the flooring and wreak havoc on the subfloor. I've talked to countless folks that install it in bathrooms and point this out to them and they just shrug.

    The response I got from a few contractors was well it's been installed in multimillion dollar homes!

    Uhhhh, so?

    I guess that means they can afford to fix water damaged subfloors. :? :?
    Therein lies the rub.
Sign In or Register to comment.