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Kayak?

Flying Clay DiskFlying Clay Disk Member Posts: 34,435 ✭✭✭✭
edited May 4 in General Discussion
Nunn, seems like I remember you were looking into getting a kayak a long time ago.  Did you ever get one?

Anyone own a kayak?
If so, what kind and how do you like it?
Reason for asking: I was thinking about getting one for fishing.

Comments

  • Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 10,667 ✭✭✭
    Not Nunn, but I have a Hobie Pro Angler and love it. There are many more kinds of pedal-powered kayaks now (Hobie was the originator) and I very strongly recommend you look very hard at one of them. For fishing, pedals beat paddles hands down (wordplay intended).
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
  • Flying Clay DiskFlying Clay Disk Member Posts: 34,435 ✭✭✭✭
    Thanks!  How easy is it to get in and out of?
    Is it the 'sit-in' or the 'sit-on' kind (sorry, not very good at 'kayak-speak')?
  • JimmyJackJimmyJack Member Posts: 3,872 ✭✭✭
    edited May 4
    Another vote for Hobie.  Depends on how nimble you are.  Son in law uses his on Puget Sound to set crab traps.
  • Flying Clay DiskFlying Clay Disk Member Posts: 34,435 ✭✭✭✭
    edited May 4
    I'm not "nimble". 
    I'm basically a Water Buffalo on stilts!
  • Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 10,667 ✭✭✭
    All pedal kayaks are sit-ON. They're still extremely stable. I stand in mine quite often if the waves aren't too high and I've never come close to tipping it over even though I raised my seat three inches (to get a better angle hip to pedals). Pelican and others also make pedal units, some with propellers (which allow you to back up easily) and some with "penguin wings"  like Hobie's.
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
  • NeoBlackdogNeoBlackdog Member Posts: 12,150 ✭✭✭
    JimmyJack said:
    Another vote for Hobie.  Depends on how nimble you are.  Son in law uses his on Puget Sound to set crap traps.
    I don't know why he'd need to set traps in the Sound to catch crap.  Should be plenty on the sidewalk from all of the homeless!
  • RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,047 ✭✭✭

    Jackson sit on top

  • RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,047 ✭✭✭

    Always go with the adjustable up and down seat.

  • KenK/84BravoKenK/84Bravo Member Posts: 6,394 ✭✭✭✭
    edited May 4

    Used to sell Kayaks for years and years. Owned five up until recently. Gave the Son two to take out west.

    The Hobie paddle boats are nice, and fairly fast. I have been in/on one several times. (No reverse.) Ocean Kayak makes a very nice, very stable line of fishing specific sit on tops. One of the ones I gave my son was a top line Ocean Kayak called a Scupper Pro. One of their longest (more length equals more speed, less maneuverability.) Boats designed for multiple day Sea Kayak type trips with below deck dry chambers for gear and flotation.

    Most all fishing specific rigs are going to be sit on tops.

    For a relatively inexpensive option to get started, their used to be a sit in, with a fairly open cokpit called a Keowee. I used to own one and have fished out of it inumerable times. Used to be around $325/350. A good starter boat. Last time I looked at a Cabelas catalog/flyer they offered at least 2 fishing specific fishing models (forget the brand) withought breaking the bank. $475-650 range.

    There is no "perfect" boat. They are all better at one thing over another. (Why I used to own 5.) plus I sold em' and would get Pro-deals (below cost) from manufacturers.

    Shoot me any questions you may have. I will probably know the answer.

    Started kayaking when I was 13-14.


    You can get phone #'s for manufactures from the web. Give them a call or visit a dealer, they will hook you up with catalogs of their entire line.

    If there is an REI (Recreational Equipment Incorporated.) anywhere near you, they are a good Co. to do business with.

    Extreme NE TN/W NC ya'll. 😁

  • Flying Clay DiskFlying Clay Disk Member Posts: 34,435 ✭✭✭✭
    Oh yeah, there's a HUGE REI store in Denver, but I try to stay away from there.  I'm afraid some of that liberal-hippy-virus might rub off on me!  Might go in looking for a fishing kayak and come out wearing Birkenstocks, some kind of hemp shirt and eating vegan granola!
  • jimdeerejimdeere Member Posts: 19,602 ✭✭✭✭
    If you get a sit-on, try to get one with the best seat. (Back support)
  • nunnnunn Forums Admins, Member, Moderator Posts: 34,999 ******
    I tried kayaking with my cousin who owns a few.  Not being "nimble," I was not able to disembark gracefully.  Instead of getting out, I fell out.  So, I bought a canoe.
  • Mr. PerfectMr. Perfect Member Posts: 59,296 ✭✭✭✭
    JimmyJack said:
    Another vote for Hobie.  Depends on how nimble you are.  Son in law uses his on Puget Sound to set crap traps.

    Lots of crap in Puget Sound. Shouldn't be hard to trap.
    Some will die in hot pursuit
    And fiery auto crashes
    Some will die in hot pursuit
    While sifting through my ashes
    Some will fall in love with life
    And drink it from a fountain
    That is pouring like an avalanche
    Coming down the mountain
  • Flying Clay DiskFlying Clay Disk Member Posts: 34,435 ✭✭✭✭
    Gee, Nunn...that would have been helpful about 7 hours ago!
    Oh well.
  • FrogdogFrogdog Member Posts: 2,089 ✭✭✭

    I have had a variety of sit-ins, sit-on-tops, etc. In the end, never have found a kayak that I liked much for fishing. They just keep you too low to the water. A canoe is so much better - higher, dryer, more comfortable seat, easier to get to gear, etc. My current set-up is an Old Town Pack Canoe, and it's perfect. Only 12 feet long and 33 lbs. Throw it on your shoulder and go. So much more versatile than any kayak.

    I do use a two-bladed kayak paddle with it though. It can really get that little canoe moving!

  • Flying Clay DiskFlying Clay Disk Member Posts: 34,435 ✭✭✭✭
    I considered a canoe for a long time, and you're right, they're more comfortable fishing because they're higher.  That benefit is also the canoe's biggest downfall too (around here anyway).  Because you (and the canoe) sit higher on the water it presents a much higher profile and cross section to the wind and they drift all over the place unless you're constantly paddling (and not fishing).  So, I was hoping I might find something lower.  It didn't seem like the kayaks had this problem (as much) from what I could see.
    But, you're probably right, maybe I should just look at canoes a little more.  Never looked at the model you're talking about, so I'll go do that now.  If you've got a pic of your setup, I'd love to see it.
  • FrogdogFrogdog Member Posts: 2,089 ✭✭✭
    edited May 5

    FCD,

    Below is a video about one. It's not my exact canoe (same model), but you'll get the idea. Note the seat in it. It's a bit lower in the canoe than a regular flat cane seat. I have the flat one, but have used the other, and it definitely adds a bit of stability. As to the wind, I haven't noticed any more drift with this little canoe than with a kayak. They all drift around, and it can be irritating. I use a little anchor like the guy in the video, and it's worth it's weight in gold. Sometimes, if I'm on a lake, and it's calm, I'll throw one out the stern too, to keep it from pivoting.

    🐸



  • Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 10,667 ✭✭✭
    Sit too low in a kayak? Really? Here I am in mine...


    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
  • hillbillehillbille Member Posts: 10,836 ✭✭✭
    edited May 5
     I have one of the small 2 man plastic pontoon type boats, only weighs about 100 pounds or so, but you will need a small trolling motor, mine is 18lb thrust, because it is rectangular shaped it is a bit hard to row, biggest plus is each "pontoon" is filled with foam so it is almost impossible to sink, you may turn it over and loose all your gear but it will still float, I love it with the grandkids for this fact alone........ mine is a basstracker  but their are other brands out there also
  • FrogdogFrogdog Member Posts: 2,089 ✭✭✭
    I guess a lot also depends on how much $$ you want to drop into it and where you intend to use it. The Hobies and the like are out there, and they're great (Rocky certainly looks comfortable!!)......but they ain't cheap, they're a restricted in rivers, shallow water, or those lakes with a ton of algae (due to the drive system underneath), and they are pretty darn heavy at 80+ pounds rigged up. 
  • Flying Clay DiskFlying Clay Disk Member Posts: 34,435 ✭✭✭✭
    edited May 5
    Doesn't look like Old Town makes the "Pack Canoe" anymore (not on their website, and everywhere else says 'no longer available')   Closest thing I could find was 49 lbs.
  • Flying Clay DiskFlying Clay Disk Member Posts: 34,435 ✭✭✭✭
    That's a nice looking rig.  I like the pedal idea (not required though).  What happens if you get it in the shallows, does it damage it?

  • Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 10,667 ✭✭✭
    I'd love it if mine were only 80 pounds! Mine runs over 100 empty. That's without the seat, loaded storage bin, gear, ice chest...
    It's a bit taxing to get it atop my Highlander, but by first setting the bow up and then lifting the stern, it goes up without a coronary. It takes about 20 minutes to load or unload all the gear and get the 'yak strapped to the roof, and that's the most tiring part of a fishing trip in it. Pedaling it is a breeze; I can literally troll with it all day if I choose to. No more effort than walking.
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
  • KenK/84BravoKenK/84Bravo Member Posts: 6,394 ✭✭✭✭

    Having owned an Old Town Pack canoe and having sold many of them. If you could get your hands on one, that would be perfect. Killer little lightweight boats, very versatile. Excellent for fishing.

    I did not even consider one as you were asking about kayaks. Tunnel vision.

    Extreme NE TN/W NC ya'll. 😁

  • papernickerpapernicker Member Posts: 1,069 ✭✭✭
     I bought my 1st, a 8ftr at Cabela. Spent same on parts to make stabilizers to keep from flipping and I haven't. Boat tracks poorly, too short,  but the side rigs sit a couple inches above water.
  • jimdeerejimdeere Member Posts: 19,602 ✭✭✭✭
    I regretfully sold my last canoe, a Blue Hole M17a, a few years ago. That thing was a tank. I bought it used in 1985 for $500 and sold it around 2015 for $500. Last time I took it down the river, it wore my butt out.
  • arraflipperarraflipper Member Posts: 1,167 ✭✭✭
    I used to use an electric troweling motor on my canoe.  Put the battery towards the front, I had a Mowhawk canoe.  The seats were like the old tractor seat, so pretty comfortable.  I would reverse the front seat it made you closer to the center, along with a bucket of water up front.  Catch a fish throw it into the bucket.  Made fly fishing with a popper much better, and when you were done and it seemed to always be breezy you turned the motor to high and sped back to the dock area.  Not fancy but sure beat trying to paddle and fish.
  • JimmyJackJimmyJack Member Posts: 3,872 ✭✭✭
    If you could find one of the original Grummund Sport Boats you might like it.  They are 17 foot very stable and capable of  a small motor if you like  It has double oar locks and the company was bought out by another aluminum canoe maker.  They are hard to find.
  • Flying Clay DiskFlying Clay Disk Member Posts: 34,435 ✭✭✭✭
    Well, after looking around a bit.  One company on planet Earth made a capable and quality canoe which weighed 33 lbs.  Now, everyone on planet Earth wants one and no one makes one.
  • FrogdogFrogdog Member Posts: 2,089 ✭✭✭
    edited May 6

    Until today, I wouldn't have imagined Old Town would discontinue the Pack Canoe. What a shame. From what I read, it had to do with the maker of Royalex (the material that made it so light) discontinuing the product.

    If you can tolerate 20 more pounds, I think the Old Town 119 is the closest. Pretty nice looking rig with the nice seat and foot pegs.......



  • Sig220_Ruger77Sig220_Ruger77 Member Posts: 12,704 ✭✭✭
    We have two cheapies from Menards. I believe that the brand is Viper. Bought them used from my cousin, which worked out great. We got 2 for the price of 1 and seeing we weren't sure how much we like and use them, that seemed like the way to go. This year will be our second summer with them and even though we used them quite a bit, we see no reason to upgrade. I'm going to install some pole holders in mine and add a small anchor, but they otherwise do everything the wife and I need them to do at this point.

    Jon
  • Chief ShawayChief Shaway Member, Moderator Posts: 5,840 ******
    edited May 6
    JimmyJack said:
    If you could find one of the original Grummund Sport Boats you might like it.  They are 17 foot very stable and capable of  a small motor if you like  It has double oar locks and the company was bought out by another aluminum canoe maker.  They are hard to find.
    I have one but mines 15',
    Stable as all get out. 
    It came with a 62 Johnson 4. 
    4 years ago, I put a Tohatsu 3.5 4 stroke on it. 

  • Chief ShawayChief Shaway Member, Moderator Posts: 5,840 ******
    I also have the Old Town Saranac 146. 
    Great canoe. 
    I also was thinking of going the kayak route but, decided with the river I was planning on running, I'd have a hard time getting in and out of it without becoming soaked. 
  • pulsarncpulsarnc Member Posts: 4,146 ✭✭✭
    edited May 6

    Too old and sore with arthritis for a kayak. Do all my fishing from a 16 Jon boat and a 17 ft skiff Years ago I had some inflatable kayaks that really worked well and were a lot of fun . But then I was a lot smaller and more flexible . Son had one two years ago I had to have help getting out of it the one time I tried it

    Life doesn't have to be perfect to be wonderful
  • RobOzRobOz Member Posts: 9,047 ✭✭✭

    I have the Old Town Discovery 119. I believe it is 11' 9" long and around 50 lbs. It's a decent boat and handles well. I would recommend flotation bags if river paddling class II.


  • notnownotnow Member Posts: 1,372 ✭✭✭
    I've got a 17 foot Coleman canoe. It's not portable at all. Well maybe with 3 healthy adults. It's durable. Heavy thick plastic of some sort.  But not indestructible. My son and his buddy put about 800 lbs of gear in it and went down a rocky rough river and buckled and bent the frame tubes. It didn't bother me a bit because I didn't like using it. Canoes don't seem stable to me. They feel like they're going to roll all the time. So that canoe has been sitting for about 4 yrs.
  • Don McManusDon McManus Member Posts: 21,627 ✭✭✭✭
    Sit too low in a kayak? Really? Here I am in mine...


    We have a couple of those, Rocky.  The Mirage drive really has some get-up-and-go.


    Freedom and a submissive populace cannot co-exist.

    Brad Steele
  • Rocky RaabRocky Raab Member Posts: 10,667 ✭✭✭
    Yes it does. I find that once I'm cruising, I move along at the rate of my retreating foot. That is, as either foot comes back, it appears as if I were walking because that foot stays stationary on the "pavement." My walking speed is just about perfect to troll crankbaits, too!
    I may be a bit crazy - but I didn't drive myself.
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